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1 




LIBRARY OF 






LASELL SEMINARY 






AUBURNDALE, MASS. 




+*. No ?.y.3 




*j~^$~ <&JU~~J^ tf >r- 













'^^iiBm&mG 



• * 



OCTOBER, 1887. 




L/}$ELX LE/ll/^8 



VOLUME XII, -No. 10. 



CONTENTS. 



^/ 



Editorial 3 

Two Lasellians in Venice 4 

The Mediaeval Saint 6 

In Memoriam 7 

Round Lake 9 

Lasell Reunions .10 

Lectures 10 

Locals 10 



Personals 12, 20 

Marriages 13 

At Wellesley 13 

New Students 13 

Political Notes 14 

Scientific Notes 14 

Art Notes 15 

Exchanges 15 



Lasell Leaves. 



NOVELTIES 



■ IN- 



MILLINERY 

RECEIVED DAILY FROM PARIS and LONDON, 



Ladies are invited to call and examine before purchasing 
elsewhere. Correct Styles. Popular prices. 



HENRY M. BURR & CO. 



490 Washington Street, 



BOSTON. 



OUR SPECIALTIES. 

american¥atches, 

DIAMONDS, 

Sterling Silver Ware, French Clocks and Bronzes, Fine 
- Plated Ware, Jewelry and Fancy Goods. 

Designs and estimates for class rings, pins and badges furnished 
without charge. 

N. G. WOOD & SON, 

444 Washington Street, Boston. 

LAWRENCE, WILDE & CO. 

Manufacturers of First-Class 

FURNITURE 

AND 

INTERIOR DECORATIONS, 

Nos. 38 to 48 Cornhill - - Boston. 



A. Lawrence. 
Wm. H. Hull. 



Geo. B. D arrow. 
F. D. Wilde. 



ESTABLISHED 1830. 



ALFRED MUDGE & SON, 

PRINTERS, 

No. 24 FRANKLIN STREET, BOSTON, MASS. 

HAVE UNSURPASSED FACILITIES FOR 

BOOK AND MISCELLANEOUS PRINTING, 

ELECTROTYPING AND STEREOTYPING, 

MERCANTILE AND COMMERCIAL PRINTING, 

FANCY BALL AND SOCIETY PRINTING. 



LAW WORK A SPECIALTY. 

A FULL LINE OF WEDDING STATIONERY ENGRAVED OR PRINTED. 

WEDDING OUTFITS executed in the finesl = manner ■* ^•fJ^ ,e b S rl ^ pUy furn ished, either 
Information regarding work In any department will at all times oe p 
personally or by correspondence. 

ALFRED MUDGE & SON, 24 FRANKLIN STREET. 



JLasell Leaves. 



C. D. COBB & BROS. 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 

GROCERIES 

Of the Very Finest Quality, 

And IMPORTERS of 

-*FANCT GARDEN TEASe^ 

Every .Article Warranted. 



Orders of $20 and. upwards Delivered at any 
point within lOO miles of Boston. 



FOR PARTICULARS, SEND FOR CATALOGUE TO 

C. D. Cobb & Bros. 

722 to 732 Washington Street, 
BOSTON - - - MASS. 



T. E. MOSELEY & CO. 



DEALERS IN 




TS, SHOES, RUBBERS, ETC. 



FOR LADIES, GENTLEMEN, BOYS, 
MISSES AND CHILDREN. 

A Large Assortment for 

YOUNG LHDIES. 



GYMNASIUM SHOES 

In Great Variety. 

ENGLISH LAST WALKING BOOTS, 

IN CALF OR GOAT, 
Are SENSIBLE, DURABLE, and REASONABLE in Price. 



T. E. MOSELEY & CO. 

469 Washington Street, 

BOSTON. 



COBB, BATES & YERXA, 

IMPOR T3JRS 



AMD 



GROCERS. 



Twenty-dollar orders delivered free at any station 
within 50 miles of Boston, and fifty-dollar orders at 
any station in New England, at our regular retail prices 



COBB, BATES k YERXA, 

680 to 692 Washington Street, 
3 Bowdoin Square, 

6 and 8 Faneuil Hall Square 



Also in 



CHELSEA, FALL EIVEE and TAUNTON, 



GOOD MUSI C FOR ALL THE YEA R ROUND. 

Is found in such books as the following, which, when kept at hand, fur- 
nish unfailing entertainment for the player or singer. 

Song Classics for Low Voices. 

• (one dollar.) 
About 50 Gems of Song by the best modern composers; Rubinstein, 
Lassen, Grieg, Gounod and others. A true treasure for Alto, Baritone 
and Bass Voices. 

S03STG- CLASSICS. 

(one dollar.) 

For voices of average compass. All selected from the best sources. 

PIANO CI.ASSICS. 

(ONE DOLLAR.) 

An admirable collection of pieces in the best taste, by some of the best 
living composers. 

YOUNG PEOPLE'S CLASSICS. 

(ONE DOLLAR.) 

Easy pieces that will please all, young or old. 
The G-ood Old Songs We XJsed to Sing. 

($I.OO PAPER; $1.25 BDS.) 

A grand good new book, which will be received with open arms in 
every household. About 120 songs, with piano or organ accompaniment. 
Each one has been a distinguished success. Many are new to the pres- 
ent generation. Mailed for Retail Price. 

OLIVER DITSON & CO., BOSTON. 

GEO. E. ALLEN, 

12 Winter Street - - - - Boston. 

THINGS, BUTTONS, LACES, YARNS, CORSETS, 

AND FANCY GOODS. 



youN 



G'S HOTEU 



EUROPEAN PLAN. 



OPPOSITE THE HEAD OF STATE STREET, BOSTON. 

Ladies' entrance, Court Street, near Washington Street. 

J. R. WHIPPLE, PROPRIETOR. 



Lasell Leaves. 



hastings, 
Jhe (^hotographer. 



QHe offei? io frje (STrWiietiinq etna Llr)<aei? 
©lasses, ar)<a also io Irjziv rjurnei?©us pier)d.s, 
Tirjxisxial <ztdtferi)ferqes, kofi) J01? excellence oj 

PHOTOGRAPHIC WORK 

Gtija reecsorjerlale prices. we quetrarjfee irje 

rnosi @Aj?iisfic ifjroemciierjs rnerele. 



No. 147 Tremont Street 

corner of West Street, 



BOSTON 



MASS. 



LADIES' FINE FOOTWEAR. 



We have added for Fall and Winter, many new lines, including 
specialties of which we have exclusive control. 



GYMNASIUM SHOES, 
WEDDING AND PARTY 
BOOTS AND SLIPPERS. 



HENRY H. TUTTLE & CO. 

435 Washington Street, 
BOSTON. 




THE CLASSY 



xr/iV*)* 



..-IL^d ^^, .,. 



PHOTOGRAPHER 



For Lasell Seminary, 



-^ 



*.'88* 



Studio, 22 Winter Street 



BOSTON. 



DUX FEMINA FACTI." 



~ 



Volume Xllt LASELL SEMINARY, AUBU^NDALE, JrfASS., DCTDBE^, 1BB7. Number IB, 



LASELL LEAVES, 



Published Monthly, during the School Year, 

BY THE 

Lasell Publishing Association 

OF 

LASELL SEMINARY FOR YOUNG WOMEN, 

Auburndale, Mass. 

Editor-in- Ch ief. 
ELIZABETH H. D. EDDY, '88. 

Local Editor. 
JOSEPHINE BOGART, '89. 



Political Editor. 
EULA LEE. 

Scientific Editor. 
SUE BROWN, '88. 

Musical Editor. 
CARRIE M. BROWN. 



Art Editor. 
BERTHA A. SIMPSON, '8 

Exchange Editor. 
ANNE O. BUSHNELL, '8 

Business Manager. 
A. LINA JONES, 8 



TERMS, IN ADVANCE. 
One Copy, one year (including postage) . . $1.00 
Single Numbers 15 cts. 

ADVERTISING RATES. 



SPACE. 


3 MONTHS. 


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9 MONTHS. 


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Press 0/ Alfred Mudge &* Son, 24 Franklin St., Boston. 



" We, who are about to live, salute you," chants 
the salutatorian, on each successive commence- 
ment day. This utterance, like all those which 
proceed from the lips of the high school and col- 
lege graduate, is typical of our age. It is no 
longer left to the salutatorian, but is put into the 
mouths of all who embark on any enterprise what- 
ever. 

Formerly it was enough simply to have an ob- 
ject in life. It was not thought necessary to pro- 
claim this object from the house-top ; the results 
were left to speak for themselves. But now, in 
glaring prospectus and daring promise, people 
have to reiterate the fact that they are going to 
do something of importance. Too often it proves 
only another instance of " ridiculus mus nascetur" 

Though we are old-fashioned, and object to this 
use of the startling prospectus, still we follow the 
popular leading, solaced by the thought that we 
have at least one thing to relate that has already 
been accomplished, i. e., the long talked-of change 
in the form of the Leaves. 

Solaced also by the thought that now that the 
Leaves has put on a more attractive dress, perhaps 
we shall see here, also, the triumph of the struggle 
of the " inner " to adapt itself to the " outer." 

We propose to express our views on all sub- 
jects. We shall "dare and again dare," — with 
one exception ; we shall never venture to be as 
"funny as we can," having seen in a journal near 
at hand the disastrous effects of such rashness. 

Literature, science, and politics shall speak 
" for our graver hours " ; and " when the fulness 
of time comes," we shall pay tribute to folly ; 
shall delight the " old girls " with items of local 
interest. Thrilling accounts of serenades, and ex- 
cursions on the Charles River, etc., will be given 
in full, this department being in charge of a 
special editor. And as an aid to the " new girls " 
in finding out the intricate ways at Lasell, there 



Las ell Leaves. 



will from time to time be published a carefully 
revised edition of rules and regulations, with notes 
and appendix. 

" As many men, so many minds." Each after 
the manner of Theophrastus Such, shall hunt the 
little heap of millet seeds for his own particular 

pearl. 

_»-, 

The long vacation with all its possibilities has 
come and gone. Probably, for the average stu- 
dent, nothing is more elusive and more hard to get 
into than the real vacation spirit. Not that we 
do not all consider ourselves eminently fitted for 
the joys of vacation ! Quite the contrary. But 
after the first delightful plunge, the time shrinks 
so perceptibly, and there is always such a haunt- 
ing consciousness of the things one ought to be 
doing, but is not doing at all, that, at the best, 
vacation, in the Hawthorne use of the term, has 
come to be a delusion and a snare, unless, 
indeed, one is constituted like the small child 
who used occasionally to wander into the edi- 
torial sanctum. Seating herself with an aban- 
doned air, she would say with a chuckle, " Every 
minute I stay here, I am doing just what I 
have made up my mind not to ; but it 's such 
fun!" 

Perhaps the root of all the trouble lies in the 
"plus capacity " which these thirteen weeks seem 
to have when they are still in the future. They 
seem to offer such good opportunity for practising 
music, making up back studies, writing one or two 
essays left over from last year, answering accu- 
mulated letters, reading reference books, and 
posting one's self on current literature, to say 
nothing of all the good times that must be crowded 
in any way, etc., etc , ad infinitum. 

One delightful philosopher of Lasell acquaint- 
ance says she always improves the summer va- 
cation to take an inventory of all the "incomes " 
and " outcomes " of her character during the past 
year ; and to decide on the course of action she 
deems it advisable to follow until the next sum- 
mer. If there are any habits to be broken off, 
or other decided changes to be made, she finds 
them easier of accomplishment at the beginning 
of the school year when everything else is starting 
anew. Besides, as she puts it, " I don't believe 
much in resolutions any way, but it 's a superstition 



of mine, as the possessor of a New England con- 
science, that they ought to be made some time. 
And so, all things considered, the summer seems 
the best season. You can't do much then any 
way, and it seems a pity to take the time later, 
when your brain is more active and you might 
better be doing something than merely plan- 
ning it." 

But, however our last summer vacation has been 
spent, we fail to learn wisdom in preparing for 
the next one. At the beginning of the Junior 
summer vacation, as at the beginning of the Sub- 
Freshman, we are proudly confident that there 
will be plenty of time to make up in the coming 
thirteen wheks what there was not time for in the 
past thirty-six. 



The Chautauqua Assembly, Lake View, afforded 
a good opportunity for a number of Lasell girls 
to meet each other this summer ; and when one 
thinks for a moment, what better place, or even 
more suggestive, could such a party have selected? 
Here was a chance for any literary inclination to 
have its full share of attention, no matter in what 
line it might be ; there were normal and drawing 
classes, concerts and lectures, the latter being on 
widely different subjects, thus enabling all to find 
an interest in them. 

There were twelve of us. Our number was not 
complete, however, until one evening, when Prof. 
Bragdon joined us ; do you wonder that for a few 
moments we felt as if back at Lasell, and on our 
way to some concert ? 



TWO LASELLIANS IN VENICE. 

It was a dreary day in early spring when my 
friend and I entered Venice. For hours the rain 
had been pouring down steadily as we came by 
rail from Florence, and as we crossed the pictur- 
esque and rugged Apennines we could only 
catch tantalizing glimpses of winding valleys and 
dashing mountain torrents through a thick veil of 
mist. By and by wide, level plains succeeded the 
hills ; then reedy swamps, and soon the train left 
the mainland, and ventured out upon a long 
trestle bridge, over the dim lagoons, where the sea 
birds were flying overhead toward the mysterious 



Lasell Leaves. 



city, the "beautiful Venice," of which we had 
dreamed all our lives, as the enchanted dwelling 
of all poetry and romance, with eager longings to 
behold it. 

To be sure, it was a little unromantic, in the first 
place, to approach it by rail, though that we could 
forgive. But when the porter had shouted 
" Venezia ! " and after passing through a very 
modern and bustling station, and descending some 
wet and dirty marble steps, we were hustled into 
a low, black, damp, musty-smelling arrangement, 
like a floating hack, and found ourselves moving 
slowly along a narrow, gloomy ditch, where green 
slime and refuse were swimming between long 
rows of clingy houses, shutting out what little light 
there was that gray and chilly afternoon, we 
could not speak, but looked at each other in silent 
horror. Nor when we at last arrived at a damp 
and melancholy hotel, and were shown into a 
damp and dreary room, did we recover our spirits ; 
and when we set out to find St. Mark's, wander- 
ing through the rain and mud with blue noses and 
fingers aching with cold, even our ardent hopes 
well-nigh failed us. 

But half desperately we clung to the conviction, 
in spite of all, that this chilly and cheerless Venice 
that we saw could not be the " bella Venezia " of 
the poets, and the darling of the painters, and for 
two forlorn, disconsolate days we waited in faith 
and patience for the revelation of the Venice of 
our dreams. And gloriously we were rewarded ! 
One afternoon, as we sat writing by the scanty 
fire in the dull reading-room of the hotel, the won- 
derful change came, all in a moment, before our 
delighted eyes. The heavy, gray clouds rolled 
away out to sea. The sun shone forth in its 
majesty. The once sluggish and leaden waters of 
the canal became dimpling blue, all flecked with 
gold ; and in a few minutes more we were floating 
in an open gondola in the rosy light and warmth, 
gazing at the fairy city, with its glittering domes 
and towers, resting lightly as a bird on the 
waves. 

We had found our Venice at last. Now we 
think of it all brilliant with sunshine, and fresh 
with the pure sea breeze, and all the winding canals, 
great and small, beautiful with the reflection of 
the deep blue sky over them, and cheerful with 
the songs of canaries at the windows of the tall 



houses. Many an hour we spent, gliding lazily in 
a softly moving gondola, among the ships from all 
lands lying at anchor, or on the Grand Canal, past 
its palaces and churches, still lovely in their decay. 
We loved to ramble about the streets (for there 
are streets), they were so narrow and crooked 
and queer. As to going straight towards any 
given point, that was impossible. When we came 
to two intersecting ways, we tried to decide which 
looked the most promising, and followed it ; but 
just as likely as not it would end in some closed 
court, or be cut short by a canal, and we would be 
obliged to turn back; but we never lost our way, 
though we did get into some strange-looking 
places. The handsome, dark-eyed, rosy cheeked 
people we liked ; we found them so polite, none 
staring at the two inquisitive Americans, prowling 
about so curiously. They live so much out of 
doors that one can see all the details of their 
every-day life, and we were especially interested 
in the great pots of beans and potatoes cooking 
in the open air, for the noon breakfast of the work- 
ing people, who would come to fill their bowls, 
and then sit down contentedly in any sunny corner 
to eat. They are a sun-loving race, these dark 
children of Italy, and no wonder ; we became so, 
too, and were glad enough to escape from the 
chilly rooms and corridors of our hotel to the open 
squares, glowing with light and warmth and color # 
I have not spoken of the strange Eastern-look- 
ing church of St. Mark, like some wonderful 
cavern in the "Arabian Nights," with its walls all 
incrusted with gold ; nor of the Doge's palace, 
with its splendid frescos, masterpieces every 
one; nor of the Academy, with its paintings of 
the Venetian School. Many books have been 
written to describe them all ; and we ordinary 
travellers can only look and admire, and tell the 
delight they give us. One feels in Venice that 
there is another world besides the every-day one 
in which we usually live and move, — a world of 
beauty, which the Venetians have deeply felt, 
and wonderfully revealed to us in noble buildings 
and paintings, and even in the smaller arts of life, 
for there is not a well in a public square where 
the poor women come to draw water that is not 
enriched with delicate carvings, nor a chain sus- 
pending a lamp in a church that is not a thing of 
beauty. This makes the fair city a never-failing 



Lasell Leaves. 



joy to the cultivated taste and intellect as well as 
to the eyes. 

But be sure, girls, that though you may have 
heard a thousand times about the "Venetian 
School of Painting," it will not be enough. You 
cannot enjoy these pictures much unless you know 
something about them, the men who made them, 
and the thoughts that they and their fellow-citi- 
zens were thinking and living by in those days. 
If you know nothing of all this, their works will 
be to you as a writing in a foreign tongue, and in 
half-effaced letters, too, for time has dealt cruelly 
with them, and robbed them of much of the rich 
and glowing color that was once their glory. 
" Scratched-out arrangements," an Englishman 
whom we met called them, and such they were to 
him, and nothing more. He had "eyes, but he 
saw not." We hope better things, though, of our 

" Lasellians Abroad " ! 

L. Le H. 



THE IMEDI/EVAL SAINT. 

The Mediaeval Saint is the completed product 
of the latter part of the Middle Ages. His exist- 
ence was rendered a possibility by social and politi- 
cal forces which had been at work long before, 
during what is called the Dark Ages. Ignorance 
was the first characteristic of these dark days, — 
an ignorance fairly appalling. As a necessary con- 
sequence, a vast body of superstitions arose. 
What little learning existed was in the church, and 
the monks were looked up to on that account. 
A natural outcome of this reverence was the 
belief that monks were all-powerful with God, as 
intercessors for sinners. Many of them used 
their power most injudiciously, and consequently 
the church became rich and corrupt, and a shelter 
for criminals. 

During the eleventh and twelfth centuries 
many better influences arose, and those who chose 
a monastic life did it for the purpose of good to 
their fellow-men, rather than for the salvation of 
their own souls merely. Such a one was Ber- 
nard of Clairvaux. He, as well as many others 
who had not, perhaps, as much influence as he, 
earned the title of saint from his pure life and 
character, not from the miracles which he did. 

St. Bernard of Clairvaux was the master 
mind of his age, — in truth, of all ages. No one 



has possessed such power, and with it such 
purity of soul and character as he. 

Perhaps many have had as great influence, but 
we may question whether they were as perfect in 
other ways as St. Bernard. He was born into 
the very time and surrounded by the very cir- 
cumstances which it would seem could not help 
but being forth a saint. The people were roused 
to religious zeal, and the Crusades were preached 
to eager listeners. Bernard's mother was almost 
a saint, and he owed his early religious training 
to her. From his earliest years he practised the 
most rigorous self-denial, in consequence of 
which his health was very much impaired. When 
he determined to enter the Benedictine Monas- 
tery of Citeaux, he also determined that he would 
not go alone. By his powerful personal influence 
he overcame the opposition of his uncle and five 
brothers, and they entered the monastery also. 
This is merely an instance of his marvellous per- 
sonal ascendency, which has never been sur- 
passed. It is this which characterizes his life 
throughout. When the Abbot of Citeaux sent 
Bernard with a handful of followers into the Val- 
ley of Wormwood, to found a new abbey, Ber- 
nard carried the work through, and cheered the 
disheartened monks, by his personal magnetism. 
They hewed down trees, and cleared the forest, 
and raised the Abbey of Clairvaux, destined to 
be renowned through the name of St. Bernard. 

The above is a glimpse of Bernard at twenty- 
five. For the next quarter of a century he was 
the court of appeal in all matters of law or reli- 
gion, for all people, far and near. No matter so 
great or so trifling but Bernard was called upon 
to decide it ; and he never failed to satisfy in his 
decisions. We learn from his four hundred and 
forty-four letters the subjects upon which he 
wrote, and they were indeed various. Yet they 
were all in answer to some appeal for help. He 
never wrote to command, and one never sees any 
personality in his letters ; he never gives advice 
merely to show his own personal ascendency ; he 
must have been conscious of his power, yet he 
seems sublimely unconscious. His religion 
meant to him a regeneration of all whom he could 
reach, not the saving of his own soul. It was to 
him a social duty. 

Not only is Bernard the judge and decider of 



Lasell Leaves. 



all disputes, but lie is the hater of heretics, and 
we see the passionate side of his nature in his 
dealings with them. Here, too, his personal 
power is felt none the less. The heretics flee 
from him, and those who stay to hear him are con- 
vinced of the error of their ways. Abelard, even, 
who had previously felt the power of no main in- 
fluence against his heresy, was vanquished ; and 
that, too, when he was flushed with power and 
certain of victory, and when Bernard had been 
forced to come from his convent, although ill 
and distrustful of his own powers. 

Bernard's principal work in his later years was 
the preaching of the Second Crusade. He in- 
fluenced the people to enter upon it, and he lived 
to see its utter failure. This failure was a severe 
blow to him and embittered the last years of his 
life. He saw in it only God's judgment upon 
men's perversity and sinfulness ; he could not see 
how Europe had been closer knit together. It is 
the voice of history that the first three Crusades 
were necessary to the safety of the West ; that of 
these the second, if one of the saddest, was not 
the least important. 

The story of St. Bernard is far less well known 
than that of some who have not had a tithe of his 
influence. He upheld the church upon his 
shoulders, and could have been a Pope had he 
been ambitious. We can have no doubt that the 
Papacy would have been much improved under 
his jurisdiction, for he wrote letters to the Pope, 
often warning him against too much temporal 
power, and defining and limiting the papal power 
to those things which are spiritual. He had be- 
come so necessary to the stability of the church 
that when he died, the church, feeling itself with- 
out a support, was shaken and became demoralized. 

We can but wish that Bernard had left a suc- 
cessor. The Papacy would have been checked 
in its career of power, and the history of the 
church would have been different. 

St. Bernard is a type of the resolute, active 
saint, who had no idea of obeying, but seemed 
to have been born solely to command. The 
study of the Mediaeval Saint would not be com- 
plete without glancing at some of the other types 
of saints, and no one seems to offer a greater 
contrast to Bernard than the woman, St. Eliza- 
beth of Hungary. 



St. Elizabeth is the type of the struggle of the 
Middle Ages, first, between an unconscious or 
scriptural purity and a conscious or popish 
purity; and next, between a natural, healthy love 
for home and kindred and the contempt in which 
the relations of wife and husband, parent and 
child, were held by a celibate clergy. We surely 
can have no idea of the tortures of a soul which 
endeavored to harmonize these contradictory 
claims; for this reason, Elizabeth's struggle is 
hard to understand We praise or pity her ac- 
cording as we look at one side or the other of her 
character. Those who praise her see the self- 
denial of the saint ; her patience under all trials ; 
her generous nature, and her pity for all sufferers. 
Those who pity her — none can really blame her 
who was so misguided in that age when celibacy 
was deemed necessary to true religion — see her 
mistaken in her faith, and led astray by a too 
tender conscience. 

She has loved Lewis, her husband, ever since 
they were children, yet she is filled with doubts 
how to reconcile that love with the love for Christ, 
which fills her whole nature. It seems inconsis- 
tent to her, and she says : — 

"And yet I swore to love him. So I do 
No more than I have sworn. . . . 
And yet our love is Jesus' due — and all things 
Which share with him divided empery 
Are snares and idols." 

F. E. B. 

( To be continued.) 



IN MEMORIAM. 

Died at her home in Glen's Falls, N. Y., Sunday, Sept. 4, 
Caroline McEchron. 

How little we thought, that last morning in 
June, when we were singing " God be with you 
till we meet again," that before we should come 
back to our work at Lasell one of our best beloved 
would have gone to that upper and better school ; 
that she, in whose life here music made so large 
a part, would so soon " join the choir invisible, 
whose music is the gladness of the world " ! 

Nor can we realize yet the change that has 
taken place. We knew that Carrie was not 
intending to return to Lasell this year, and so we 
involuntarily think of her at her home in Glen's 
Falls, having all the good times she had planned 



8 



Las ell Leaves. 



for this her first year out of school. She had 
spent a happy summer entertaining and visiting 
Lasell friends. Her health seemed good, with 
the exception of occasional trouble with her head. 
This trouble finally terminated in congestion of 
the brain. She was ill only a short time. Her 
suffering was intense, but when conscious, she 
showed that the valley into which she was fast 
sinking had for her no shadow, and in this spirit 
the end came. 

On Tuesday afternoon her friends gathered in 
large numbers to pay loving tribute to a beautiful 
life. There were flowers everywhere, and every- 
thing seemed as if arranged for a happy home- 
coming rather than a going away. 

Even the grave was so lined with flowers and 
ferns by her intimate friends that it seemed as if 
she were laid away into a garden. 

Rev. Dr. Hubbard (the "Uncle Merritt" of 
whom we have heard Carrie talk so much) spoke 
most appreciatively of her life and aims. One of 
the Lasell friends who was present says that he 
said exactly the things she herself should like to 
have said had she been able to find the words. 

But it is more especially of her life among us 
here at Lasell that we would speak. She came 
to Lasell just two years ago. Very soon her 
simple, joyous, yet earnest life made itself felt as 
an influence. As a student, she was faithful and 
diligent ; as a friend, there was not one more true 
and steadfast. She early identified herself with 
all the best purposes of the school. She was a 
valued member of the S. D. Literary Society, and 
one of the best workers in the temperance and 
missionary societies. Best of all, she was, in the 
best sense of the word, a " self -governed" girl. 
No one had a more cordial hatred of shams ; no 
one could be simpler in character, and freer from 
all pretence. "She was genuine all the way 
through," says one. "If she once became con- 
vinced that a thing was right, there was no moving 
her; but if she found herself in the wrong, she 
was not afraid to acknowledge the fact. That 's 
why I liked her so well." Another girl wrote on 
Sept. 6: "And now Room 31, too, will be set 
apart, as it were. I shall always remember the 
surprised way in which she said to me, ' Why ! ' 
once when I was in some trouble here in school. 
Many of the other girls seemed to take it for 



granted that I was equal to just that sort of thing ; 
but the surprise which she showed at the thought 
that I would do such a thing, did much to make 
me sorry and ashamed. I am sure that none of 
us — at least not I — will ever pass Room 31 
without wishing ourselves better girls." Says 
another : " She was a Christian, every inch, but 
a Christian who knew how to get as much enjoy- 
ment out of life as any one I ever knew. Even 
when I have been feeling saddest about her death 
and been wiping away the stray tears, I have had 
to laugh, too, at the thought of all the jolly times 
we have had together." Her teachers speak in 
warm appreciation of her sunniness, her public 
spirit, her courage, and her readiness to do what- 
ever was given her. 

And so we might go on multiplying tributes, 
but it is needless, for they are all spoken with one 
voice. What she was to us, we all know ; what 
she would like to have been, her own words can 
best tell. Once when something was said to her 
about leading a prayer-meeting, she read to a 
friend these words of George Eliot's : — 

. . . Who live again 
In minds made better by their presence; live 
In pulses stirred to generosity, 
In deeds of daring rectitude, in scorn 
For miserable aims that end with self. 

Be to other souls 
The cup of strength in some great agony, 
Enkindle generous ardor, feed pure love, 
Beget the smiles that have no cruelty, 
Be the sweet presence of a good diffused, 
And in diffusion ever more intense. 

"There," said she, "that's my ideal of what a 
life should be ; that 's what I should like to read 
to the girls, — what I should like to be to them 
and to every one. But I am young, and I don't 
remember, and I 'm not that at all ; so I don't 
dare read it, for I am afraid they will find the 
contrast too great." 

The message was not given to us then, but it 
has all the more significance as a message from 
her to us to-day. 

What more can we add, except to say once 
more what all of us who knew her wrote to her 
father and mother, " We shall always be inex- 
pressibly glad that her school life was a part of 
our own " ? B. A. S. 



Lasell Leaves. 



The following resolutions were passed by the 
Y. W. C. T. U. : — 

Whereas, It has pleased our Heavenly Father to take 
from our society our dear friend and former Vice-Presi- 
dent, Caroline McEchron; therefore, 

Resolved, That our Union has lost a most earnest Christian 
and a most faithful and cheerful helper in the work of this 
society. 

Resolved, That we express to the family of our friend our 
sincere sympathy in their great sorrow. 

Resolved, That a copy of these resolutions be sent to Miss 
McEchron's family; also that they be placed in the records 
of the society, and published in the Lasell Leaves. 

The S. D. Society, at its first meeting of the 
school year, adopted the following resolutions : — 

Whereas, It has pleased our Heavenly Father to remove 
from our midst our beloved friend, Caroline McEchron ; and 

Whereas, We, the members of the S. D. Society, feel 
deeply the loss of one of our most faithful and loyal workers, 
whose memory will ever remain dear to the members of the 
society; therefore, be it 

Resolved, That we extend our heartfelt sympathy to the 
bereaved family in their great affliction; and 

Resolved, That these resolutions be entered in the records 
of the S. D. Society, and a page in said records be set apart 
to the memory of our departed member; and 

Resolved, That copies of these resolutions be sent to the 
family of her whom we mourn, and to the Lasell Leaves, 
for publication. 

Committee, Bessie Harwood, Daisy E. Lloyd. 

Resolutions of the Missionary Society : — 

Whereas, Our Heavenly Father, in removing from our 
number Caroline McEchron, has taken one who has con- 
stantly been an inspiration and help in the missionary work; 
Resolved, That we do hereby express our grateful appre- 
ciation of the service that she has so freely and cheerfully 
given to this society. 

Resolved, That we extend to the members of Miss McEch- 
ron's family our heartfelt sympathy in their great bereave- 
ment. 

Resolved, That a copy of these resolutions be sent to Miss 
McEchron's family; that they be placed, also, on the records 
of the society, and in the Lasell Leaves. 



ROUND LAKE. 

Train leaves Boston at 8.30 a. m. ; arrives at 
Albany 2.50 p. m. In the pouring rain, and com- 
forted by the louder and deeper grumbling of the 
women around me, I pick my way to the Dela- 
ware and Hudson station, where I wait until 3.30. 

At East Albany the party " dismounts " which 
has furnished entertainment for me all the hot 
way, — two middle-aged women, sisters, have be- 



tween them two babes in arms, four children not 
much older, two bird cages, and uncounted boxes, 
bundles, etc. One has a bad toothache and a 
swollen cheek. If you don't think it was a bad 
day for these women, — and the youngsters, too, 
— you don't comprehend the situation. I helped 
them out, and pitied the one small man who had 
come to meet them. 

Ida Sibley passed into the car right by me, but 
not looking to the right or left. I smote her on 
the shoulder. She did not notice it. I spoke 
her name. She looked straight before her. 
Quite satisfied with this result of Lasell training, 
I let her pass on, but, later, coaxed her back by 
me a few moments. She looked very well and 
bright, weighs more than ever, — I guess, — and 
is happy in her work, which is training all young 
Warren how to draw. She was on the way to 
Saratoga to attend the School of Methods. 

" Round Lake " was called all too soon. Here 
we found a fine grove right on the railroad, with 
three of the best buildings I have seen on any 
school campus ; a few busy workers in a summer 
school under Dr. Worman ; a fairly interested 
attendance at the assembly, run by a couple of 
steam engines, not large but steadily " puffing " 
away, — Messrs. Farrar and Loomis ; a beautiful 
double lake of great possibilities, but not great 
present use ; two good hotels, at one of which we 
had the pleasure of eating with Miss C. J. C. at 
the table of C. D. Hammond and wife, cousins of 
Miss C, and leading persons in the management 
of the association. The constant rain did n't 
dampen our spirits. We enjoyed ourselves and 
some other good things very much. No admis- 
sion is charged, but there is a ten-cent fee for 
some of the entertainments. I don't see how 
they pay expenses. I don't believe they do. I 
suppose they do it from mere love of diffusing 
knowledge ! Twenty-five cents is charged for 
admission to the art gallery, and it is well worth 
it. There were many good pictures there. I 
wished that I could add some of them to the 
Lasell collection. By Mrs Hammond's polite- 
ness, I rode out between two showers, and saw a 
little of the beautiful country about. I heard 
Mr. French, of Chicago, who is better than Frank 
Beard in drawing for an audience ; also Henry A. 
Starks, brother of our Mary of '76 (of him we 



IO 



Lasell Leaves. 



heard of Mary's prosperity in Utica), the suc- 
cessful pastor of the First Methodist Church in 
Albany, perhaps the best church in the confer- 
ence. As a side interest, he works up Egypt, in 
which he is getting no little reputation. He is a 
pleasing speaker, and on the whole acceptable, — 
as a Lasell graduate's brother. 

Carrie McEchron was near, and we almost 
decided to go to Glen's Falls. How far from our 
thoughts was it that we should see her no more ! 
How surely we should have gone had we dreamed it I 

We saw Ida Phillips of '79 at Saratoga, where 
she has been spending a pleasant vacation in 
attendance on her father, J. M. Phillips of the 
book concern, who was suffering severely from 
neuralgia. Ida looks well ; reports Carrie Preston 
as prospering. C. C. B. 



Lasell reunions are springing up spontaneously 
in cities where " our girls " are numerous and hos- 
pitable, as in Denver, Minneapolis, Chicago, 
New Orleans, etc. Why not organize, friends, 
for helpfulness and cheer to yourselves and your 
Alma Mater, so giving form and effectiveness to 
what is now occasional and accidental ? 

Here are instances : A Lasell girl from New 
England chances to visit in Denver, and writes, 
"I cannot tell you how much I enjoyed meeting 
so many old Lasell girls, of whom I had heard : 
Minnie Routt, Lulu Price, Fannie Hanscome, Lu 
Wells, and others." 

We can recall a score and more, in Denver, of 
whom we should be glad to hear. 

Carrie Ebersole, '85, visited Annie Kirkwood 
and Maude Hamilton Baker, last June. Dora 
Walston, too, was there. 

The Minneapolis Lasell girls could make a 
bright social circle of themselves, and help us to 
answer inquiries about old girls by reporting duly. 

We want to hear of the Oswalds, Lucy Phelps, 
and the rest. Libbie Hance is here again, and 
very welcome. Annie Kirkwood and her mother 
have spent two months here. Annie is better in 
health, — horseback riding and Christian science 
mixed judiciously. 

Mabel Cogswell reports Benjie well, and con- 
sequently all happy at Killingly. Addie Johnson 
has visited them. 



Dr. Kendig has accepted the charge of a 
church in Brooklyn, N. Y., leaving Carrie and 
Annie so nicely settled near them in Boston. 
Ah, girls, " the best laid plans of mice and men," 
etc. 



LECTURES. 

Friday evening, Sept. 16, was the occasion of 
the first lecture of our literary course. Prof. 
Homer B. Sprague treated the subject " John 
Milton " as only an ardent scholar and devoted 
admirer of the great poet can. The magnificent 
thought and graceful oratory of the lecturer so 
combined instruction with entertainment that 
we, one and all, longingly look forward to his 
promised lecture later in the year. 

Miss Frances Willard, president of the W. 
C. T. U., gave us a very pleasant talk in the 
chapel, Sunday, Sept. 25, choosing for her sub- 
ject "The White Cross and the White Shield." 
Miss Willard spoke with much earnestness, and 
held the attention of the girls very closely. She 
is always sure of a hearty welcome among us, not 
only from the friends who have been life-long, 
but also from the girls, although few of them have 
a personal acquaintance with her. 



LOCALS. 

" ' Where are you going, my pretty maid?' 
' 1 'm going to the Annex, sir,' she said." 

The holidays are over. The colleges and 
seminaries have begun work once more, and 
every one is telling every one else how fat and 
brown she is. 

The old girls gave the new ones an informal 
reception on the first Saturday evening after our 
return. This afforded an excellent opportunity 
for all to become better acquainted, and also gave 
the homesick ones a chance to forget their sor- 
rows for a time. 

One new girl, who had evidently undergone a 
mild form of hazing at the hands of some Sopho- 
more, was heard to inquire in an awestruck 
tone "if she could n't take a bath without first 
consulting the doctor." 



Lasell Leaves. 



1 1 



Why don't some enterprising old girl, or girls, 
step forward with a design for that much-talked-of 
Lasell pin ? 

The first week of school, the girls were in- 
debted to Mr. Bragdon for two very enjoyable 
rides on the Charles River. A small steamer met 
the parties at Weston Bridge, and conveyed them 
as far as Waltham. The day was all that could 
be desired, and it is needless to say the girls en- 
joyed the charming scenery. A vote of thanks 
is due Mr. Bragdon for his kindness. Although 
the ride above mentioned did not take place at 
" two o'clock" the girls were just as well satisfied. 

We have some very enterprising girls among us 
this year. One insists upon having a practice 
hour at 6 a. m., and another would like to take a 
lesson at 5.15 a. m. 

The Senior class rejoices in two new members. 

The perplexed look which, of late, has orna- 
mented the brows of our Senior sisters is fully 
accounted for when we learn that they are pre- 
paring a vocabulary which, when finished, will 
rival Worcester, and make Webster, if he knew of 
it, turn green with envy. 

Wanted. — A name for the extension recently 
built in the second hall. A prize will be offered. 
To self-governed girls, permissions to go into Bos- 
ton occasionally. To the new girls, one party 
dress for the Freshman reception. We expect to 
be overwhelmed with offers. 

THE FUNNY MAN. 

[Froj?i the Chicago Tribune."] 

Do you see that poor, dejected fellow, 

With eyes so mournful, with skin so yellow, 

And a form as thin as a waxen taper? 

He 's joker-in-chief of a comic paper. 

He was, by nature, a sunny man, 

But a wrong start made him a funny man. 

He sits at his tiresome desk all day, 

And writes in a sad, perfunctory way. 

He heaves a sigh as he fashions a pun. 

He groans as he grinds his grist of fun. 

His head may throb, and his heart may ache, 

But his cap and bells he still must shake. 

Though fashioned, perchance, for better things, 

He beats his cage with his useless wings. 

Ephemeral as a fleeting vapor 

Is he who cuts his salaried caper 

As joker-in-chief of a comic paper. 



According to one of our rising " young women," 
Longfellow was a contemporary of Shakespeare, 
and John Bunyan the greatest living American 
poet. Now don't let us hear anything more about 
the higher education of women. 

Y E humble local editor has added, at least, two 
inches to her stature since a Sub-Freshman took 
her for the editor-in-chief. 

The mischief-working chestnut has arrived in 
the land. "He's little, but oh, my!" The 
havoc he can create with the unwise maiden is 
indeed heartrending. For further particulars, 
inquire at 70 or 37. 

The steady tramp of the marching many is 
upward this year instead of downward. The 
water tank is on the third floor. 

We had about concluded that the story about 
Senior privileges was a myth, but of late these 
privileges have developed wonderfully in the way 
of soup plates and bone dishes. 

Verily, Lasell is putting on considerable airs 
this year ! Who would have thought that the 
much-talked-of overflow, which was to be called 
Lasell Jimior, would develop into a full-grown 
Annex? But such the fact remains. About 
twenty-two girls, under the protecting care of 
Mr. Cassedy and Miss Sheldon, are residing there 
at present. The house is pleasantly situated and 
well furnished. All the modern conveniences. 
Among the latter may be mentioned the small 
bell-boy, who has created a great furor among 
the susceptible maidens, and teachers, as well, we 
hear. We expect great things of the "Annex 
Maiden," and trust that this new departure will 
be so successful it will become a fixture at Lasell. 

"The melancholy days are come, the saddest 
of the year," and now is the time to lay in a 
stock of winter reading. We advise you to sub- 
scribe for the Lasell Leaves, for all who take 
it, like people taking Murdock's Food, will 
be glad, and those who do not take it will be 
sorry. Subscribing for the Leaves is an excel- 
lent way for the old girls to manifest their inter- 
est in Lasell. 

Who is " Nan " ? The editorial board is con- 
sumed with a desire to know. The efforts of the 



12 



Lasell Leaves. 



religious editor in this direction would be very 
commendable if employed in a higher cause ; as 
for the rest of the board, they are patiently wait- 
ing for further developments. 

By the courtesy of Brig. -Gen. Charles Wil- 
liams, of Manchester, N. H., who recently visited 
his daughter Mabel here, we have received a 
copy of the " Official Proceedings at the Dedica- 
tion of the Statue of Daniel Webster, at Concord, 
N. H., June 17, 1886." The book may be seen 
in the library. 

A former pupil of Lasell, — long years ago, — 
now a rich widow, and keeping her interest in the 
school, wants to offer a prize to Lasell pupils for 
some excellence, just what she has not decided. 
We invited her to come and see what progress we 
have made in the years since she was here, and 
what we are most in need of. 



PERSONALS. 

Laura Conger is at school in Galesburg, 111. 
Miss Kathleen Zeile sailed for Europe " to 
study" Sept. 5. 

Elizabeth Brownell visited Helena Pfau and 
Annie Gage this summer. 

Miss Mathews's vacation was saddened by the 
death of a very dear aunt. 

Sue Stearns is spending the winter in Boston. 

Emma Russell has at last been heard from. 
She is at her home in Lockport, N. Y. 

Louise Dietrick called to see the new " fix- 
in's " and say a " sad good by " to old haunts. 

Miss Larrison is teaching rhetoric and com- 
position in Mrs. Lucy Hartt's Academy for Girls, 
in Buffalo. 

Corinne Heinsheimer was called home before 
the close of the year by the death of her grand- 
father. 

Miss Mercy Sinsabaugh, '87, has gone, 
abroad with her mother, and intends spending the 
winter in Germany. 

Miss Lucy McBrier lost her sister during 
vacation, a very lovely young lady, who is well 
remembered by those who had the pleasure of 
seeing her when here. Lucy has the deep sympa- 



thy of her many friends in this second sad bereave- 
ment during the year. 

Miss Mosetta Isabel Stafford, '86, has 
deserted the Lasell Annex for that of Harvard. 

A rumor is current about school that Miss 
Ransom's brother, we think it is her brother, is 
building a green-house out of the plates she 
spoiled this summer in her photography. 

Miss Packard, a member of the class of '83, 
takes Miss Cooper's place in the mathematical 
department, and Miss Cockle has charge of Miss 
Call's work for a time. 

The Williamsport girls were nearly all away 
when Mr. Bragdon was there. He saw Miss 
Rachel Allen, and heard good words of the 
others. Miss Bubb has a class in the Sunday 
school. 

With much sorrow we announce the death of 
Mr. Isaac Reed, Fannie Reed's father. His 
death was very unexpected to Fannie, who, on 
her return to school but a few days before, had 
left him in his usual health, though not well. 
Mr. Reed was an exceptionally kind father, and 
one of the leading men in his own town and 
State. The entire community feel his loss. 
Fannie has the sympathy of all the school in her 
bereavement. We are very glad that she is still 
to be with us this year. 

Mrs. Nellie Tracy-Ryan, whose sudden death 
we notice in the local papers of Springfield, 111., 
where she lived, was a pupil of Lasell in 1882. 
There are few here now who knew her, but these 
have only kind words and remembrances of one 
whose gentleness and Christian character en- 
deared her to all who knew her. Her school 
work was much interrupted and her stay here 
shortened by constant ill health, so that her circle 
of acquaintance in the school was somewhat lim- 
ited. But wherever she was known she seems to 
have been highly valued. She was an active and 
earnest worker in the church and Sunday school. 
She had united with the Congregational Church 
while yet very young. Her marriage took place 
two years ago, and she was making a pleasure 
trip to Colorado, with her husband, when she was 
taken ill on the train, and died at Hastings, Neb., 
Sunday, Sept. n. 



Lasell Leaves. 



13 



Her early death has brought great grief to the 
hearts of a large circle of relatives and friends. 
We, of Lasell, heartily sympathize in their afflic- 
tion, feeling our right to share in the loss, as she 
was a daughter of the school. 

Mary Robarts is teaching in the Normal 
School at Carbondale, 111. 

Ada Dunaway was here in vacation, and 
writes regretfully of her failure to see any of her 
dearest friends here. She continues at home 
the study of music and painting. 

Emily and Tessie Shiff have visited Miss 
Call recently, and have shown their happy faces 
once in a while at Lasell, and enjoyed the new 
pictures, etc. 

Elenor Nichols is studying phonography and 
typewriting. 

Lillie Potter, '80, and her mother visited 
Lasell during vacation. 



MARRIAGES. 

Miss Minnie J. Bigelow, '8i, was married 
Sept. 15, to Dr. Wm. E. Peterson, at Webster, 
Mass. Their present residence is 507 Main 
Street, Waltham, Mass. 

The engagement of Mamie Marshall, '85, 
Denver, Col., and Mr. E. P. Call, Newtonville, 
brother of our Miss Call, is announced. 

The record of the class of '83 has at last been 
broken by the marriage of its youngest member, 
Seraphine G. Mason, to Ernest Dumas, of Lowell 
(Lina Maynard Bramhall's cousin) . The wedding 
took place Oct. 4, in their " new home " on Hunt- 
ington Street, Lowell, a beautiful house, newly 
built, and charmingly furnished. Among the 
guests were Prof. Bragdon, Miss Corey, the 
Misses Packard and Miss Merrill. In spite of 
the excitement of the evening and three years in 
California, Mrs. Dumas seemed much like the 
Sephie Mason of '83. Our congratulations and 
best wishes go with them. 

At Lawrence, Mass., Aug. 11, Miss Bertha A. 
Harris and Mr. Francis B. Armington. 

Miss Maude Hamilton and Mr. Samuel L. 
Baker were married May 4, 1887. They live in 
Minneapolis, but have not told us where, so we 
can't call. 



At Birmingham, Conn., Sept. 14, Miss Susie 
Ailing and Dr. Charles T. Baldwin. 

At Nottingham, N. H., Sept. 27, Annie Eliza- 
beth Bartlett, our quondam publisher, and Fred- 
erick J. Shepard. At home Nov. 3 and 18, East 
Derry, N. H. 

Sept. 24, Miss Ida Mack and Mr. Albert L. 
Mansfield. Their residence is in Putnam, Conn. 

At Willoughby, Ohio, Oct. 12, Miss Gertrude 
Penfield, '86, and Mr. Frank Augustus Seiberling. 

Emma E. Cooper, who has been connected 
with Lasell two years as teacher of mathematics, 
was married at Springfield, Vt., on the morning 
of Oct. 5, to the Rev. Carlos L. Adams. Married, 
as she was, in her own home, surrounded by a 
little circle of friends and relatives, with her 
father to perform the ceremony, Miss Cooper had, 
in a very true sense, a home wedding. Almost 
immediately after the wedding lunch, Mr. and 
Mrs. Adams left Springfield to take the Western 
train for West Branch, Mich., their new home. 



AT WELLESLEY. 

Nellie M. Whipple and a friend gathered 
together seven children on a Sunday in July, 1886, 
and took the name of Christ Church Sunday 
School. This school has not only proved itself 
a success, but from it has grown the church ser- 
vice in the town hall, now in charge of Rev. 
J. G. Welles. Many children have been gathered 
in who attended no religious service. How much 
girls can help if they will only set about some 
needed work in any community ! 



NEW STUDENTS. 

Mary Adamson, Germantown, Pa. ; Annie 
Alexander, Oakland, Cal. ; Sarah Aston, Meadow 
View, Va. ; Josie Baker, Rockford, 111. ; Emma 
Barnum, Auburndale ; Ma)r Beach, Minneapolis, 
Minn. ; Augusta Bente, Hoboken, N. J. ; Clara 
Bowen, Lockport, N. Y. ; Nancy Boyce, Wil- 
loughby, Ohio; Inez Bragg, Gunnison, Col. ; 
Fanny Buntin, Terre Haute, Ind. ; Sadie Burrill, 
Ellsworth, Me. ; Jessie Butler, E. Haddam, 
Conn. ; Margaret Chapin, Worcester, Mass. ; 
Nelia Churchill, Campello, Mass.; Annie Clark, 
Rye, N. Y. ; Mabel Clement, Wichita, Kan. ; 



H 



Lasell Leaves. 



Ida Colburn, Delaware City, Del. ; Madeline 
Colburn, Delaware City, Del. ; Julia Coy, Little 
Rock, Ark. ; Irene Cushman, Deadwood, Dak, ; 
Cordelia Davis, Chicago, 111. ; Florence Davis, 
Auburndale ; Lizzie Davis, Beatrice, Neb. ; 
Susan Day, Colchester, Conn.; Delia Fowler, 
Paris, Tex. ; Etta Fowler, Paris, Tex. ; Florence 
Freeman, Syracuse, N. Y. ; Lizzie Freeman, Syr- 
acuse, N. Y. ; Florence Fuller, Augusta, Me. 
Allie Gardiner, Chicago, 111.; Jennie Gardiner 
Chicago, 111. ; Bertha Gray, New Haven, Conn. 
Alma Hall, Charlestown, Mass. ; Amy Hall 
Chelsea, Mass. ; Amelia Harris, Milford, Mass. 
Grace Havens, Terre Haute, Ind. ; Mary Hazel 
wood, Grand Rapids, Mich. ; Virginia Hogg, Fort 
Worth, Tex. ; Ella Holden, Montreal, Canada 
Tillie Holman, Philadelphia, Pa. ; Stella Hoyt 
Denver, Col. ; Nettie Keener, Denver, Col 
Mabel Ladd, Boston, Mass. ; Martha Ladd 
Waterbury, Conn. ; Emily Little, Merrimac 
Mass. ; Gertrude Littlefield, East Taunton, Mass. 
Mary Marsh, Lansingburgh, N. Y. ; Maria Moyer 
Mt. Kisko, N. Y. ; Nellie Osgood, Somerville 
Mass. ; Daisy Parkhurst, East Boston ; PriscillaPar- 
menter, Gloucester, Mass. ; Laura Pew, Glouces- 
ter, Mass ; Altha Phelps, Chelsea, Mass. ; Idelle 
Phelps, Denver, Col. ; Blanche Pruyne, Belleville, 
N.Y.; Ella Quinlon, Kansas City, Mo; Jennie Quin- 
lon, Kansas City, Mo.; Fanny Raum, Washington, 
D. C. ; Luella Richards, Lawrence, Mass.; Lucy 
Sargent, E. Saugus, Mass.; Ida Simpson, Pensa- 
cola, Fla. ; Grace Skinner, Evansport, 111. ; Grace 
Spellmeyer, Hoboken, N. Y. ; Anna Staley, 
Ottawa, Kan. ; Maudie Stone, Philadelphia, Pa. ; 
Nettie Sturdevant, Rome, N. Y. ; Martha Tash, 
Dover, N. H. ; Frances Thomas, Boston ; Helen 
Thresher, Monson, Mass. ; Maud Van Horn, 
Lockport, N. Y.; Isabelle Warren, Baraboo, Wis. ; 
Maggie Waterhouse, Centreville, R. I. ; Harriet 
Whitmarsh, Dorchester, Mass. ; Florence Williams, 
Cherry Valley, Mass. ; Mabel Williams, Manches- 
ter, 2\Iass. ; Jessie Wilson, Chicago, 111. ; Julia 
Wolfe, St. Louis; Lucille Wyard, Washington, D. C. 



POLITICAL NOTES. 

Anarchy is threatening Morocco, and a force 
of six thousand men has been sent there to pro- 
tect the Spanish interests. 



German men-of-war have seized the Samoan 
Islands, in spite of the protest of the United 
States and English consuls. 

That the American government appreciates and 
honors men eminent for their culture was never 
more satisfactorily illustrated than by the recent 
appointment of President Angell, of Michigan 
University, to act with the Secretary of State in 
negotiating a new fishery treaty with Great Britain. 

It is announced that a delegation of the British 
House of Commons is about to visit this country 
to present to the President and Congress of the 
United States a memorial in favor of the conclu- 
sion of a treaty which will stipulate that differ- 
ences arising between America and England, which 
cannot be adjusted by diplomatic agency, shall be 
referred to arbitration, signed by two hundred 
members of the House of Commons. 



SCIENTIFIC NOTES. 

The many persons who, while familiar with the 
term " evolution," are uncertain as to the scope 
of the doctrine, will be interested in the answer 
to the question, "What is evolution?" which 
Prof. Joseph LeConte is to give in the October 
Popular Science MoJithly. 

In a letter written from Jerusalem to the Scien- 
tific American, our consul, " Merrill," writes : — 

" Palestine possesses a remarkable salt moun- 
tain, situated at the south end of the Dead Sea. 
The length of this ridge is six miles, with an 
average width of three quarters of a mile and the 
height is not far from six hundred feet." 

A new discovery is that, by the use of citric 
acid or citrate of silver, sea water may be made 
drinkable. By this means chloride of silver is 
precipitated and a harmless mineral water is pro- 
duced. An ounce of citrate makes a half pint of 
water drinkable. 

Mr. Edison is planning one of the largest and 
most complete laboratories in the country, to be 
erected at Orange, N. J., — a three-story brick 
building, two hundred and fifty by sixty feet, 
with boiler, engine, and heavy machinery, and a 
library of several thousand scientific works. The 
two upper floors will be divided into small rooms 
for experiments. 



Lasell Leaves. 



15 



MAJOR AND MINOR. 
The seventeenth Hollandish Music Festival, 
at Amsterdam, Sept. 3, was attended by six 
thousand singers, including societies from Ger- 
many and Belgium. Minnie Hauk was among 
the soloists. 

Carlotta Patti has been offered by the Czar 
of Russia the professorship of vocal music in the 
Imperial Conservatoire at St. Petersburg. She 
will, however, remain in Paris, having built a pri- 
vate theatre at her house, 16 Rue Pierre Charon. 
Private representation of operas by members of 
Parisian society will be given there. 

One of the four first prizes awarded at the 
Vienna Conservatory was taken at the recent an- 
nual examination by an American singer, Miss 
Ida Schuyler, of New York. 

Adelina Patti has a thoroughbred Skye terrier 
that can do almost everything but talk. She pays 
fabulous prices for the privilege of taking the fa- 
vored animal around with her, and feeds him on 
the daintiest dishes that the most expert caterer 
can furnish. 

Mr. A. L. King, tenor, of New York, has been 
engaged by the Boston Handel and Haydn So- 
ciety to sing in " The Messiah " at Christmas. 

"Dorothy" will probably eclipse "Ruddy- 
gore." 



ART NOTES. 

There is nothing that is not collected. A 
recent collection was made of the "epis," or pin- 
nacles of glazed pottery, which decorate the 
gables of many castles and houses of the four- 
teenth and seventeenth centuries. They are of 
all forms, including the human, are sixty in num- 
ber, and are said to be very interesting to students 
of the late Gothic and of Renaissance architec- 
ture. 

At the Paris Salon the American exhibitors 
are more numerous than ever this year, no less 
than one hundred and three being represented in 
the section of oil painting. Among the pictures 
are C. S. Reinhart's "Washed Ashore," a fine 



sunset landscape by Chas. L. Davis, and G. 
Plitchcock's " Tulip-growing." Mr. Hitchcock is 
a debutant at the Salon and his dibut is very bril- 
liant. 

The colored plate to the September Art Ama- 
teur is timely as well as beautiful, being a suc- 
cessful reproduction of a water-color drawing by 
Victor Dangon of a bunch of chrysanthemums, 
pink, yellow, and red. 



EXCHANGES. 

The exchange editor returned from her sum- 
mer vacation to find only two papers on the shelf, 
and for days she puzzled her brain with the ques- 
tion of how she was to write exchange notes 
without any exchanges. It struck her as rather 
a "bricks without straw " task. But now, almost 
obscured by the papers heaped upon her table, 
she no longer mourns a scarcity of straw, but 
rather the lack of bricks. 

We are glad to see that one at least of our 
many exchanges, The Bates Student, appreciates 
the true literary merit of the " Dress Reform 
Maiden," written by a former editor of the 
Leaves. 

No doubt the learned editor of the News-Letter 
will think us painfully ignorant, but we were not 
aware that hair could be turned red by the read- 
ing of any poetry, however horrible. Of course, 
we have heard of its turning white, but never red. 
In our younger days we have read and re-read 
some very poor poetry, but we have never noticed 
any such result. But still, the News-Letter is un- 
doubtedly correct in its statement ; we are prob- 
ably color-blind. 

In the Colby Echo for October there is a very 
interesting article on " Realism in Fiction." 

In our opinion, the article in the Yale Courant, 
called "A Modern Narcissus," is rather over- 
drawn. Where can there be found a young man 
(far less a theologue) who would have had the 
slightest difficulty in recognizing as his own the 
face in the end of the church ? If there actually 
is such a prodigy in the world, we should be in- 
terested to look at him. 



i6 



Lasell Leaves. 



FRENCH 

SHIRTINGS. 



Cheviots, 
jVfadras, 
English & 
French 
'Flannels 
& Silk 
Shirtings. 



Far Tennis, 

" Eailwaj Car, 

" Steamer Trav- 
" elling, 

" Hunting, 

" Fishing, 

*' Taohting. 

Always in stock or 

made to special 

measure. 



NOYES BEOS. 

Washington and Summer Sts. 

BOSTON, U. S. A, 



London Tan Street Gloves, warranted, at 
$1.35, at Noyes Bros. 

Dress Shirts, for Weddings, for Receptions, 
for Dinner Parties, with Collars, Cuffs, and 
Cravats, in the latest English styles. Plain 
French Bosoms, fine Embroidered Spots, 
Figures and Cords, at Noyes Bros. 

English Cheviots, English and French Flan- 
nels, Silk and Wool and Fnre Silk Shirt- 
ings, for Tennis, for Steamer Travelling, 
for Hunting and Fishing, for Railway and 
Yachting. Always in stock or made to 
special measure, at Noyes Bros. 

English Mackintosh Coats, for Ladies and 
Gentlemen, at Noyes Bros. 

English Rugs and Shawls, for Steamer and 
Railway use, at Noyes Bros. 

English Flannel, Blanket and Shawl Wraps, 
for the Sick-Room, for Steamer and Railway 
Travelling. For the bath and house use they 
are indispensable. $3.25 to $65.00. 

English Neckwear, at Noyes Bros. 



Underwear and Hosiery, in Pure Silk, Lambs' 
Wool, Merino, Balbriggan and English Cotton, 
for early fall wear, at Noyes Bros. 

English Flannel Pajamas, Long Flannel 
Night Shirts and Wraps, for steamer and rail- 
way travelling, at Noyes Bros. 



Full Evening Dress Shirts, 
Collars and Cravats 

Constantly on hand, for Dinner Parties, 
Weddings , or any occasion. 

The present English Fashion of shirts made 
with Linen Cords and Spot Bosoms may be 
had of Noyes Bros. 



ENGLISH DRESSING GOWNS, 

JACKETS AND WRAPS. 



Lawn Tennis Shirts, Coats and Hose. 



TENNIS BELTS AND OAFS in Stock and 
made to measure from choice styles of ENG " 
LISH FLANNELS. 

GLOVES of Every Description, for Dress, 
Street, Driving, and the famous London Tan, 
at $1.35, at Noyes Bros. , 



JURORS' A WARD for bearcty of work- 
manship and design, and distinguished 
excellence in the manufacture 
of Shirts, to 

NOYES BEOS. 

Washington and Summer Streets, 
BOSTON, U, S. A. 



ESTABLISHED 1817. 



JOHN H. PRAY, SONS & CO 

Importers. Jotters. Retailers and Manufacturers 5 Agents. 



Carpetings, I 




s, Oil Cloth, 



OMTJSNTjLL rugs, 

CARPETS AND UPHOLSTERY. 



558 and 560 Washington St., 

30 to 34 Harrison Ave. Extension, 



113 Worth Street 



NEW YORK. 



Lasell Leaves. 



17 



A. STOWELL & CO. 

24 Winter Street, Boston. 



$on\e of our Specialties : 

Bohemian Garnet Jewelry. 
Amber Beads and Ornaments. 
Tortoise-Shell Hair Pins. 
Choice Leather Goods. 
Oxidized Silver Jewelry. 
Fans for all occasions. 
Pearl Opera Glasses. 
Fine Gold Jewelry. 

Wedding Presents in Clocks, Vases and 
Bronzes. 

LATEST NOVELTIES IN ALL DEPARTMENTS. 
Lowest Prices. 



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YOUNG LADIES' 

001$, SHOES AND SLIPPERS, 

Stylish aud Dtirable at Moderate Prices. 

GYMNASIUM SHOES A SPECIALTY 

Thayer, McNeil & Hodgkins, 

47 TEMPLE PL- - - BOSTON. 

ARTHUR P. SCHMIDT & CO. 

IMPORTERS OF AND DEALERS IN 

FOREIGN AND AMERICAN 

Sheet Music. 

Sole Agents lor Litolffs Celebrated Edition ot 
Classical and Modern Music. 

13 AND 15 WEST ST., BOSTON. 

Catalogues sent free on application. 

BOSTON FOREIGN BOOK STORE, 

BOOKS IN ALL FOREIGN LANGUAGES. 
CARL SCHOENHO, 

144 Tremont Street - - - - One Flight Up. 

PALMER, BACHELDER & CO. 



HAVE 



CLASS RINGS, QUEEN CHAINS, 

Gold Bangles, Bracelets, Bonnet Pins, Lace Pins, 

Brooches, Collar Studs, Sleeve Buttons, 

Cuff Fasteners, 

OPERA GLASSES, FRENCH CLOCKS, 

Choice Articles in Pottery, 

AND 

PRESENTATION SILVER WARE, 

AT 

NO. 146 TREMONT ST., BOSTON. 

PALMER, BACHELDER & CO. 

ESTABLISHED IS4-0. 

Isaac Locke & Company, 

Produce Commission Merchants, 

FOREIGN and DOMESTIC FRUITS 

97, 99 and 101 Fanenii Hall MarKet, and Basement 18 Sontli Side, 

BOSTON - - - MASS. 

Telephone Connection. 



i8 



Lasell Leaves. 



-x-WEBER'S-x- 

25, 27 TEMPLE PLACE BOSTON, 

AND 33 WEST STREET, 

Ladies' and Gents' Restaurant, 

Oysters and Salads a Specialty. 

OPEN AFTER THEATRES. 

Caterer for Wedding Breakfasts, Lunches, Dinner and Evening Parties 

and Receptions. Also, Club Suppers at Short Notice 

and Reasonable Prices. 

S. "W. BAILEY, 

DEALER IN — 

■WATCHES, JEWELRY, SILVERWARE, ETC. 

353 Washington Street, Boston. 

Jewelry Neatly Repaired. Also, Monograms on Coin Pieces. Personal 
Attention given to Repairing Fine Watches. 

ESTABLISHED 1847. 



AARON R. GAY & CO. 

No. 122 State Street, Boston, 

STATIONERS 

AND 

BLANK BOO K MANUF ACTURERS, 

First-Class Account Books of any desired 
pattern made to order. 

S. S. GAY. EDWIN W. GAY. 

JUST WHAT HAS BEEN WANTED, 

A LADIES' LUNCH ROOM 

HAS BEEN OPENED AT 

23 AVON STREET, BOSTON. 

A quiet, neat place, where a nice Lunch can be had at a very reason- 
able price. All the ladies say, " Is n't it nice ? " 

T. D. COOK, Caterer. 

ALSO, 

"Wedding and other Parties 

Served with the Choicest Viands, and by Competent Waiters. 

SUPERIOR ICE-CREAM 

DELIVERED AT REASONABLE PRICES. 

THE + 



YOUTH'S COMPANION, 

A WEEKLY PAPER FOR 

YOUNG PEOPLE and the FAMILY. 

It aiais to foe a favorite in every family — looked for eagerly 
by the young folks, and read with interest by the older. Its purpose is to 
interest while it amuses; to be judicious, practical, sensible, and to have 
really permanent worth, while it attracts for the hour. 

It is handsomely illustrated, ar.d has for contributors some of 
the most attractive writers in the country. 

Subscription Price, SI. 75. Specimen copies sent free. Please 
mention in what paper you read this advertisement. 

PERRY MASON &. CO. 

41 TEMPLE PLACE, BOSTON, MASS. 



FINE FURS. 

The best quality of all kinds of Furs in popular use. 

Seal English Jackets, 

Seal Dolman Wraps. 

Seal Sacques. 

We give particular attention to orders by measure, and using the 
richest and most durable of genuine Alaska Seals, assure the fullest 
satisfaction in quality and fit. 

The fashionable 

BLACK BEAR BOAS, 

of exquisite fineness and beauty, made from skins of rare quality. 

Fur Collars, Capes, Muffs, Boas, 

Hats, Sleighing Hoods and Gloves, 

FUR TRIMMINGS. 



Gentlemen's Fur-lined Overcoats. 



Fur Mats and Carriage Robes. 



Joseph A. Jackson, 

412 Washington Street - 



Boston. 



Established 1825. 

NATHAN NEAT & CO. 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

TRUNKS AND TRAVELLII BAGS. 

BASKET TRUNKS AND STEAMER CHAIRS. 
Stateroom and Light- Weight Trunks for European Travel. 



SEND FOR ILLUSTRATED CATALOGUE. 

^6 WASHINGTON ST., BOSTON, MASS. 

The Archway Bookstore, 

365 WASHINGTON STREET, BOSTON. 



Our stock is one of the largest and most complete to be found in the 
city, including books in all departments of literature, and our prices are 
noted as being always the lowest. 

Catalogues of Books at Special Reductions 

SENT FREE TO ANY ADDRESS. 

DeWolfe, Fiske & Company. 



Lasell Leaves. 



l 9 



EDWIN C. BURT & CO.'S 

FINE SHOES AND SLIPPERS 

FOR LADIES AND CHILDREN 

ARE THE BEST SHOES MADE. 

Cost no More 



Fit Perfectly, 
Easy on the Feet 



Other 
Fine Shoes. 




For sale by leading retail shoe dealers in nearly every city throughout the United States and 
Canada. All widths of Lasts, any style of Shoe, Sole, Toe, or Heel. If you cannot 
get our make of shoes from your dealers, send address for directions how to procure them. 

EDWIN C. BURT & CO., Manufacturers, 

SPECIAL AGENTS IN BOSTON, 

Jordan, Marsh & Co., Washington St. 



Mr. JOSEPH A. HILLS 

has removed to more commo- 
dious music rooms in 

Hotel Pelham, 

Cor. Tremont and Boylston Sts., 

BOSTON, MASS., 

where he will be pleased to meet 
his pupils and others for pro- 
fessional engagements. 

Competent assistants under Mr. 
Hills' s supervision will attend to 
the instruction of those 'less ad- 
vanced who may desire lessons 
at reduced rates. 

Conductors, Concert, Opera and 
Church Singers, Pianists, Organ- 
ists, Accompanists and Teachers 
supplied at the 

MUSIC TEACHERS' BUREAU, 

HOTEL PELHAM, 
BOSTON, MASS. 



CONOVER BROTHERS' CO. 
piapofort^apufy 

14th St. and 9th Ave, New York. 

Clear, silvery, even tone through- 
out. Durable and elegant design. 
Indorsed by the profession. 

BOSTON WAREROOMS, 

Hotel Pelham. 



THE "PEERLESS" FOUNTAIN PEN 




IS THE PERFECTION OF FOUNTAIN PENS. 

Is a hard rubber holder fitted with a 16 k. gold pen of the best manufacture, and will never wear out. It will write ten thousand words with one 
filling of ink, and for taking lectures, etc., it is indispensable. There is no loss of time in dipping ink as with the ordinary pen, as the " Peerless " 
has a perfect, even and uninterrupted flow of ink, and is the best fountain pen manufactured. Price, $2.00. 

The Cross Stylographic Pen, Stylographic Ink. All styles of Stylographic, Fountain, and Gold Pens repaired. 



THEICROSS PEN CO., 306 Washington St. 



BOSTON, MASS. 



iTEZsri: x»oora to olb soxrarii ohxteck. 



20 



Lasell Leaves. 



C. H. CODMAN & CO. 

Photographic Material, 

PICTURE and FRAME DEALERS' 

< SUPPLIES > 
Wholesale and Retail Framing 

AMATEUR PHOTOGRAPHIC APPARATUS. 

34 BROMFIELD STREET, 

BOSTON - - - MASS. 



PERSONALS. 

Miss Woodward and aunt, of Washington, 
D. C, were here Sept. 9. 

Marion Beller was one of the class graduating 
from the Chicago Training School for city, home, 
and foreign missions. This school gives special 
training for a missionary life work. Three of the 
class go to China, two to Corea, two or three to 
India. We hope soon to report Miss Beller's 
special work. 

Miss Laura Folger is at the Conservatory of 
Music, in Toronto. She must miss sorely the clear 
sister Nettie, who was her companion here, gone so 
soon to a better home, a more perfect unfolding, 
turning her face toward it serenely in great suf- 
fering, leaving a family and home in which all 
things attracted her to earth. 

Lu Welles has returned after three years' study 
and travel abroad, and in company with a friend 
has opened a studio in Denver, Col. 

Lottie Hardy has begun the fourth year of 
school work at Chatham, Mass. An excellent 
commendation. 

Birdie Mason is still in Paris. 

Misses Preston, Le Huray, and Coe returned 
from their long sojourn abroad, each to resume 
her former work, but in a different place : Miss 
Preston as house physician at Smith College ; 
Miss Le Huray in Mrs. Sylvanus Reid's school 
in New York City ; Miss Coe at home here in 
Auburndale, her family having taken Mrs. Lati- 
mer's house for the winter. 



Alice Hyde, here in '74-5, spent the spring 
and summer in Auburndale. She ought to come 
oftener to her old home. 

Mrs. E. C. Van Husan (Kitty Morrill, '80), 
whose home is at 33 Peterboro' Street, Detroit, 
Mrs. H. P. Garland (Edith Pew), Saco, Me., 
and Mrs. Wm. F. Etherington (Grace Garland, 
'80), 3 First Place, Brooklyn, N. Y., came together 
in September to see their old schoolhouse. 

We think " old girls " should not leave their 
husbands and babies in town. We missed them. 

At last accounts Fanny Wiswall, '78, Evanston, 
111., was in Frangenstad, Bohemia, spending the 
summer, not intending to return to Berlin for the 
winter. Her address in Berlin is, care Die 
Deutsche Bank. 

Mamie Carter, '78 (Mrs. C. H. Stoddard), 
Ionia, Mich., writes from her very pleasant home 
for a catalogue " to see how we are all getting 
along." Sorry we cannot take in that nice boy 
eight years old. How the years fly ! Bring him 
along, and the pater, too, and show them Lasell. 

The quiet of the vacation was pleasantly en- 
livened July 13 by a very short call from the 
father of Hattie Williams Wilson, of Washington, 
Iowa. He reports himself the proud grandfather 
of Lucy Gray Wilson, who came to Hattie's house 
April 14, and is making them all happy and keep- 
ing all busy. 

Mrs. May, a graduate of thirty years ago, and 
her daughter called a few days ago. We could 
hardly credit that one so " fresh and fair " gradu- 
ated thirty years ago. 

Abbie Hill, '82, was in Boston, in October 
last, but did not care to go out to Lasell. That is 
funny. How could that be so of Abbie ? 

Gertie Orelup Kellum's husband died last 
spring, and she lives with her father in Cohoes, 
N. Y. 

Mae Fowler is organist at the Methodist 
Church at her home, Elizabeth City, N. C. She 
has a class of seventeen in the Sunday school, 
and is an active worker in the Temperance Club. 

Harriet Woodcock is at home, 449 Washing- 
ton Boulevard, Chicago. " Well and happy." 



Lasell Leaves. 



THOMAS H-A-LIl., 

MANUFACTURING 

Electrician and Optician. 

MANTJPACTTJBER AND IMPORTER OF 

Telegraphic, Electric, Mapflc, Galvanic, Optical' 
aM Meteorological Instruments. 

Chemicals, Chemical and Philosophical Appara- 
tus of all Descriptions. 

Illustrated Catalogues of each department. 

HALL'S PATENT MEDICAL BATTERIES. 

19 BROMFIELD ST., BOSTON, MASS. 

1835, Daniel Davis, Jr. 1849, Palmer & Hall. 1856, Thomas Ball. 

WADSWORTH & PICKERING, 

COMMISSION MERCHANTS, AND JOBBERS IN 

BUTTER, CHEESE, EGGS, ETC. 

STALL, 89 QUINCY MARKET, BOSTON. 

Briggs Wadsworth. F. A. Pickering. 

CHARLES H. WHITING, Formerly Hall & Whiting, 

STATIONER and BLANK BOOK MANUFACTURER 

Importer and Jobber. Publisher and Book Seller. School and Miscel- 
laneous Books. Crane's Fine Stationery. American, English, French 
and German Fancy and Staple Stationery. Weston's Ledger Papers. 

153 and 170 Devonshire Street, Eoston. 



FROST & ADAMS, 

Importers of, and Wholesale and Retail Dealers In 

ARTISTS' MATERIALS, 

DECORATIVE ART NOVELTIES, ART 
POTTERY, ETC. 



Ebonized Panels. 

Winsor & Newton's Colors. 

German Colors. 

French Colors. 

Tucker & Green's Colors. 

Sketch Blocks. 

Plaques of all kinds. 

China Colors. 

Mirrors for Decorating. 

Artists' Boxes. 

Artists' Brushes. 

Artists' Canvas. 

Handbooks on Art. 

Studies of all kinds. 

Lustra Painting Materials. 



Water-Colors. 

Bronzes. 

Brocades. 

Spangles. 

China for Decorating. 

Paper Panels. 

Tambourines. 

Repousse Materials. 

Canvas Stretched. 

Drawing Instruments. 

Plaque Rims. 

Artists' Easels. 

Drawing Paper. 

Materials for Tapestry, etc. 

Kensington Painting Materials. 



SCHOOLS # STUDENTS SUPPLIED 



AT LOW FIGURES. 



37 CORNHILL 



BOSTON. 



SEND FOR A CATALOGUE. 
F. S. Frost. H. A. Lawrence. 



ELLIOT W. KEYES, 

APOTHECARY, 

Haskins' Block - - - Auburn Street, 
auburndale, mass. 

FALL AND WINTER MILLINERY. 

MRS. M. H. KIMBALL., 

Dealer in FRENCH FLOWERS, HATS, BONNETS and TRIMMINGS, 

MELROSE STREET, AUBURNDALE. 

V. A^ PLUTA, 

Dealer in PROVISIONS, 

Cor. Auburn and Lexington Streets. 

ALFRED BRUSH, 

APOTHECARY, 

Plummer's Block, Cor. of Auburn and Lexington Sts. 
auburndale. 



MRS. I_- 


COOK, 


PIDl!lRI!IEIilSlilSlilMI!IAI!IKl!lE|i|RI;l 


"Woodbine Street - 


- AUBURNDALE.- 



FARNUM &. COMPANY, 
PRODUCE COMMISSION MERCHANTS, 

Wholesale Dealers in Apples, Potatoes, Cranberries, Onions, Peas, 

Beans, Dried Apples, Oranges and Lemons. 

Nos. 108 and no Faneuil Hall Market - - BOSTON. 

Henry Farnum. W. W. Lawrence. 



GEORGE E, JOHNSON, 



•DEALER in- 



Hay, Grain and Feed, 

Lexington Street, 

AUBURNDALE, MASS. 

CHARLES G. TINKHAM, 

Livery, Hack aid Boarflii Stable, 

Cor. of Lexington and Severn Sts., 
ATTBUEKDALE. 

JOHNSTON & KEYES, 

AUBURNDALE AND BOSTON EXPRESS. 



BOSTON OFFICES, 

105 Aroh Street, 
34 Court Square. 



AUBURNDALE OFFICE, 

Lexington Street, 
Hear the Depot. 



H. EUGENE FLEMING, PH. G. 

PHARMACIST, 

FINE CONFECTIONERY a Specialty. 

Hear City Hall - - We3t Hewton, Mass. 




V 



NOVEMBER, 1887. 





cc LEfw/q, 




VOLUME XIII. -No. 2 



CONTENTS. 



Editorial 23 

A Completer Study in Metre 25 

The Mediaeval Saint (concluded) . . . .25 

The Indefinite Article 26 

A Round of Delight 28 

In Memoriam 29 

A Summer in Bohemia .< 3° 

Political Notes 3 1 



Scientific Notes 31 

Art Notes 3 1 

Major and Minor 32 

Temperance 32 

Exchange Notes 32 

Locals . . 33 

Personals 34 



Lasell Leaves. 



NOVELTIES 



•IN- 



MILLINERY 



RECEIVED DAILY FROM PARIS and LONDON, 



OUR SPECIALTIES. 



Ladies axe invited to call and examine before purchasing 
elsewhere. Correct Styles. Popular prices. 



HENRY M. BURR & CO. 



490 Washington Street, 



BOSTON. 



AMERICAN WATCHES, 

DIAMONDS, 

Sterling Silver Ware, French Clocks and Bronzes, Fir.e 
Plated Ware, Jewelry and Fancy Goods. 

Designs and estimates for class rings, pins and badges furnished 
without charge. 



N. G. WOOD & SON, 

444 Washington Street, Boston. 

LAWRENCE, WILDE & CO. 

Manufacturers of First-Class 

FURNITURE 



AND 



INTERIOR DECORATIONS, 

Nos. 38 to 48 CornWll - - Boston. 



A. Lawrhnce. 
Wm. H. Hull. 



Geo. B. Darrow. 
F. D. Wilde. 



ESTABLISHED 1830. 



ALFRED MUDGE & SON, 

PRINTERS, 

No. 24 FRANKLIN STREET, BOSTON, MASS. 

HAVE UNSURPASSED FACILITIES FOR 

BtX>K AND MISCELLANEOUS PRINTING, 

ELECTROTYPING AND STEREOTYPING, 

MERCANTILE AND COMMERCIAL PRINTING, 

FANCY BALL AND SOCIETY PRINTING. 



LAW WORK A SPECIALTY. 

A FULL LINE OF WEDDING STATIONERY ENGRAVED OR PRINTED. 

WEDDING OUTFITS executed In the finest manner at reasonable prices. 

Information regarding work In any department will at all times be promptly furnished, either 
personally or by correspondence. 

ALFRED MUDGE & SON, 24 FRANKLIN STREET. 



Las ell Leaves. 



21 



C. D. COBB & BROS. 



Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 



GROCERIES 

Of the Very Finest Quality, 

And IMPORTERS of 



-^eFANCY GARDEN TEASe^ 

Every .Article Warranted. 



Orders of $20 and upwards Delivered at any 
point within lOO miles of Boston. 



FOE PARTICULARS, SEND FOR CATALOGUE TO 

C. D. Cobb & Bros. 

722 to 732 Washington Street, 
BOSTON - - - MASS. 



COBB, BATES & YERXA, 

IMPOR TJERS 



AND 



GROCERS. 



Twenty-dollar orders delivered free at any station 
within 50 miles of Boston, and fifty-dollar orders at 
any station in New England, at our regular retail prices. 



COBB, BATES & YERXA, 

680 to 692 Washington Street, 
3 Bowdoin Square, 

6 and 8 Faneuil Hall Square. 

Also in 

CHELSEA, FALL EIVEE and TAUNTON. 



T. E. MOSELEY & CO. 



DEALERS IN 




, SHOES, RUBBERS, ETC. 



FOR LADIES, GENTLEMEN, BOYS, 
MISSES AND CHILDREN. 

A Large Assortment for 

YOUNG LHDIES. 



GYMNASIUM SHOES 

In Great Variety. 

ENGLISH LAST WALKING BOOTS, 

IN CALF OR GOAT, 
Are SENSIBLE, DURABLE, and REASONABLE in Price. 



T. E. MOSELEY & CO. 

469 Washington Street, 

BOSTON. 



GOOD MUSI C FOR ALL THE YEA R ROUND. 

Is found in such books as the following, which, when kept at hand, fur- 
nish unfailing entertainment for the player or singer. 

Song Classics for Low Voices. 

(one dollar.) 
About 50 Gems of Song by the best modern composers; Rubinstein, 
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and Bass Voices. 

SONG- CLASSICS. 

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For voices of average compass. All selected from the best sources. 
PLAJSTO CLASSICS. 

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An admirable collection of pieces in the best taste, by some of the best 
living composers. 

YOUNG PEOPLE'S CLASSICS. 

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Easy pieces that will please all, young or old. 

Trie G-oocl Old Songs We XJsed to Sing. 

($1.00 paper; $1.25 BDS.1 
A grand good new book, which will be received with open arms in 
every household. About 120 songs, with piano or organ accompaniment. 
Each one has been a distinguished success. Many are new to the pres- 
ent generation. Mailed for Retail Price. 

OLIVER DITSON & CO., BOSTON. 

GEO. E. ALLEN, 



12 Winter Street 



Boston. 



BUTTONS, LACES, YARNS, CORSETS, 

AND FANCY GOODS. 



you 



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EUROPEAN PLAN. 

OPPOSITE THE HEAD OF STATE STREET, BOSTON". 
Ladies' entrance, Court Street, near Washington Street. 

J. R. WHIPPLE, PROPRIETOR- 



22 



Lasell Leaves. 



hastings, 
Qhe (Photographer. 



we olter io frje (^petemafinq errjel Llrjelei? 
feiletsses, arja <slso> f© irjeip rjurnerous pierj&s, 
urjusxicrl erai/aijfereres, Wit) Top excellence of 

PHOTOGRAPHIC WORK 

errjel reetsorjerlale prices. We eraerrerrjfee frje 

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corner of West Street, 



BOSTON 



MASS. 



LADIES' FINE FOOTWEAR. 



We have added for Fall and Winter, many new lines, including 
specialties of which we have exclusive control. 



GYMNASIUM SHOES, 
WEDDING AND PARTY 
BOOTS AND SLIPPERS. 



HENRY H. TUTTLE & CO. 

438 Washington Street, 
BOSTON. 




THE CLASSY 



PHOTOGRAPHER 



M-i"" 






For Lasell Seminary, 
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Studio, 22 Winter Street, 



BOSTON. 



LASELL LEAVES. 



DUX FEMINA FACTI." 



Volume XIII. 



LASELL SEMINARY, AUBLipDALE, 



NOVEMBER, 1BB7. 



Number 2, 



LASELL LEAVES. 



Published Monthly, during the School Year, 



Lasell Publishing Association 



LASELL SEMINARY FOR YOUNG WOMEN, 

Auburndale, Mass. 

Editor-in-Chief. 
ELIZABETH H. D. EDDY, '88. 

Local Editor. 
JOSEPHINE BOGART, '89. 



Political Editor. 
EULA LEE. 

Scientific Editor. 
SUE BROWN, '88. 



A rt Editor. 
BERTHA A. SIMPSON, '8 

Exchange Editor. 
ANNE O. BUSHNELL, '8 



Musical Editor. 
CARRIE M. BROWN, ' 



Business Manager. 
A. LINA JONES, '88. 

Subscription Agent, MAUD E. MATTHEWS, '89. 

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Press of Alfred Mudge &° Son, 24. Franklin St., Boston. 



Mr. J. T. Stoddard's interesting article on 
" College Composites," in the November number 
of the Century, shows us the value of this method 
of typical representation as applied to colleges, 
and the advancement it has made during the past 
few months. Composite photographs of the 
Senior classes of several of our best colleges and 
universities have been taken. They show a sur- 
prising diversity in the type of students. These 
differences are the results of many conditions, the 
most important being, as Mr. Stoddard thinks, 
that of locality. Co-composites have also been 
taken with very good success ; though this field 
of operation has not as yet been very extensive. 

It is said that a marked resemblance to one of 
the composites is to be noticed in a co-composite; 
it is also said that many times in comparing 
the members of a group with their composite 
photographs, there seems to be a predominance 
of one individual. But this only goes to prove 
that the member or group which most resembles 
the composite or co-composite comes near the 
average of the entire number. 

Although composite photography has reached 
this stage of development, still we feel it to be 
yet in its infancy, with grand and useful possibili- 
ties. It is a force tending indeed toward many 
important results. What difficult problems can 
be solved by it in the future ; what happy re- 
sults obtained in this comparatively simple way ! 
Any doubts as to the best method of school gov- 
ernment can be most satisfactorily settled by 
simply comparing composite photographs of die 
students, taken, one when the reins of government 
are tightly drawn; the other, when more freedom 
is allowed. The face which shows the most of 
individuality and self-government may surely be 
judged the resultant of the happiest method ; since 
all discipline is valuable only as a means to an 
end. 



2 4 



Lasell Leaves. 



Freshmen who are doubtful what course to 
pursue will be greatly aided in the choice of elec- 
tives by comparing the composites of those who 
have elected the sciences, languages, and mathe- 
matics, and noting the amount of intellectuality 
expressed in each. Specials too might find it to 
their advantage to study carefully the composites 
of two groups of their predecessors, — one of 
which persisted in devoting themselves to the 
things on which they " perfectly dote " ; the other 
of which were sensible enough to devote them- 
selves to things that were considered needful for 
their best development. 

The value of composite photography will begin 
to be truly realized when it is applied to the 
selection of editors for college papers. Having 
before one a composite of editors who have been 
most successful, it can be told at a glance which 
of the candidates for the enviable position are of 
the required type. Thus time may be econo- 
mized, and the pitiable mistakes that are often 
made, may be avoided. 

The best society expressions, too, can be 
decided upon in this simple way. And whp will 
not hail with joy this method whereby we may at 
last discover the most effective expression with 
which to listen to a bore ? It may then be dis- 
covered that the time-honored elevation of the 
eyebrow, and the upward sliding "Yes," even the 
passivity of the Englishman — have all been a 
mistake. 

But, seriously, Lasell should surely have a com- 
posite of some kind this year. Will not the 
Senior class, in the " progressive spirit" of its 
junior year, take the initiative ? 



Perhaps there has never been a time when 
more reading clubs were being organized in 
schools and colleges, and more systematic courses 
of reading carried on than to-day. 

The interest, increasing as the evenings length- 
en, has at last reached Lasell. We are glad to 
hear it rumored that several circles, whose mem- 
bership is limited to one or two members, have 
been formed. We congratulate these circles on 
their existence, and hope that they may only serve 
as nuclei for larger and more general circles, for 
we all agree that one thing that Lasell lacks is 



reading clubs. How often we hear the complaint 
that one has " so little time for current reading 
here." This is partly true, but more reading than 
we realize could be done in our evening recrea- 
tion hour, even if that time were used but once or 
twice a week. Would it not be pleasant and 
profitable to organize reading clubs, consisting of 
not more than twenty members each, with com- 
mittees appointed to arrange definite courses of 
reading ? All members could furnish valuable 
aid in the " books-that-have-helped-me " line. 
The courses might be as varied as the tastes of 
the individual members. For instance, one club 
might take a course in fiction, tracing the develop- 
ment of the novel through the miracle plays and 
the drama, down to the best realistic novel of 
to-day ; while current topics such as are discussed 
in the Forum and North American Review might 
furnish another circle with an exhaustless stock of 
entertaining reading. A course in Russian litera- 
ture would be very enjoyable, and surely we have 
enough artists and musicians among us to furnish 
variety in the way of Russian art products and 
Russian music. Perhaps a wandering Pole 
might be induced to visit us during the winter. 
Then, too, as Christmas approaches, nothing can 
better help us into the true holiday spirit than ex- 
tensive reading of Christmas literature, and ex- 
tensive discussion of such Christmas suggestions 
as were found last year in the editor's departments 
of Harper's Magazine, and in the " Window Seat " 
of the Amherst Lit. 

Small clubs are many times very enjoyable, 
but they are apt of necessity to repeat the ideas 
of the individual members, since only congenial 
people are drawn together in this way. 

It is said that the larger the club the larger the 
point of view ; still we believe there must be a 
limit to the size of a club that wishes to do 
effective work, and twenty or twenty-five have 
been found to be a very good limit. The best 
result of this plan of reading would be that it 
would promote the spirit of school feeling as 
opposed to diqueism, and would enable us to do 
concentrated instead of desultory reading. 

If the plea came up that the half-hour at our 
disposal each evening would be entirely inade- 
quate for such courses of reading, why would it 
not be advisable for the Faculty to consider 



Laseil Leaves. 



2 5 



whether these courses could not be substituted for 
the third elective? 

The Saturday-afternoon Shakspeare class is the 
only thing we have at present which at all ap- 
proaches a reading club. Let our use of the 
Clark Black-Bacon-Donnelly-Shakspeare cipher 
lift up its voice and cry loudly in our behalf. We 
employ this cipher in such an obvious manner 
that " the wayfaring man though a," etc. We 
count now from the seventh word from the upper 
right-hand corner ; then from the seventeenth word 
from the lower left-hand corner ; anon from the 
seventy-seventh word from the horizontal middle. 
— N. B. Notice the frequent recurrence of the 
number seveti, a. number which, often in the 
world's history, has been considered sacred. 

Applying the Donnelly cipher now, we have, — 

" To start a club — 
Ay! that 's the rub." 

Using it then, gives us, — 

" If 't were well when 't were done, 
Then 't were speedily well if 't were quickly done." 

Taking it anon, we read, — 

" How far the self-governed throw 
What otherwise would be their feeble influence. 
Good reading clubs would go and do ditto 
In our workaday world." 

By a judicious use of this cipher, we find also 
that it is the reading club, and not sleep, that 
"knits up the ravelled sleave of care, is balm of 
hurt minds, great nature's second course, and 
chief nourisher in life's feast." 



A COMPLETER STUDY IN METRE. 



Visage sardonic, 
Views inharmonic, 
Speech non-sermonic, 
Leanings Byronic, 
Had he. 



A delirious ballad, 
A bilious salad, 
A quince marmalade, 
(Pronounced as bade,) 
Made she. 



The doctor, 
With bitter nostrum, 
Mounted the rostrum, 
And 

The midnight thrilled with thunders freed from darkness, 
While through dreamland rang a voice demanding omi- 
nous 

X. 

t To be continued in our next. 



THE MEDI/EVAL SAINT. 

(Concluded.) 

Poor soul ! Is there none to lead her out of 
this maze of doubt? Instead, Conrad, "her rigid 
and bigoted confessor," plunges her deeper and 
deeper in doubt, compelling her obedience to his 
will. She sees in him the servant of God, whom 
she implicitly trusts as her guide to a perfect life. 
Conrad, we can see, gloats over her promised 
obedience ; at the last, after witnessing her suffer- 
ings and death, he says, with sublime egotism, 
''And I have trained one saint before I die!" 
This was his supreme wish, and to this end he 
seems to care not what tortures he inflicts upon 
the delicate soul of Elizabeth. She clings to 
Lewis in the midst of her doubts, and as if in 
punishment for loving any earthly being so much, 
she scourges herself, and tortures her body as well 
as her mind. Lewis, with all his love for her, 
worships her as a saint, and feels unworthy to be 
the husband of so perfect a woman. He can but 
remonstrate at her tortures of herself, but she 
silences him with the doubts that have over- 
whelmed her own soul. The supreme moment 
of her agony comes when he is torn from her 
arms to enter upon the Crusade. When Conrad 
congratulates her upon being a crusader's wife, 
"Yes," she replies, "and a crusader's widow!" 
and she spurns Conrad as one who can give her 
no comfort. She does become a crusader's widow, 
indeed, and when the news of Lewis's death comes, 
the first act of his mother and sister, with whom 
she has lived, though she is hated by them for her 
beauty and holiness, is to turn her away with her 
children. She takes refuge with a cousin, a bishop, 
and there is prevailed upon by Conrad, who re- 
tains his ascendency over her, to enter a convent. 
She can hardly bear up under the thought of leav- 
ing her children, and all that is dear to Lewis and 
to her ; yet, renouncing all her possessions in favor 
of the church, she retires to misery and loneli- 
ness, where Conrad can have full sway over her. 

We can see her tending the sick and suffering, 
and giving all that is in her power ; and in the 
midst of her anguish of heart, she tortures her 
body almost beyond human endurance, hoping to 
lose in bodily pains the doubts which torture her 
soul. Not only must she lose her children, not 
even knowing how they are to live, but Conrad 



26 



Lasell Leaves. 



deprives her of her maid Guta, and her nurse 
Gseutrudis, who have been with her since child- 
hood, and who have been sharers with her in all her 
sorrows and misery. He places with her, in their 
stead, two wretched old women, who have no sym- 
pathy with her, and no interest, save to see how 
much misery and pain she can endure. If suffer- 
ing can make a saint, Elizabeth was surely one. 
She was of such a pure, generous, lovable nature, 
that it did not need pain to make her perfect. If 
she could have lived as her love for her husband 
and children directed her, she would have been 
none the less a saint. 

Only twenty-four years old when she died, she 
put into those years such misery and suffering 
that it seems a marvel that nature could have 
endured it as long. The glory of Elizabeth's 
sainthood seems lost in our pity for her utter 
desolation. 

After studying the lives. of these two it seems 
to me that we cannot doubt that true saints 
lived in those dark, rough times. Whether they 
lived in the world and faced the scorn of heretics, 
as St. Bernard did, 01 lived more closely in them- 
selves, and shone before the world as examples of 
perfect purity, as did St. Elizabeth and St. Francis, 
in either case we feel humbled before them 
There is, of: course, a tendency to smile at their 
simplicity, and be impatient at their meekness. 
But we sho dd rather admire their straightforward- 
ness and their nobleness of character in carrying 
out what they felt to be their duty. Saints were 
needed more especially in that age, not because 
the age was any more wicked, — for this age cer- 
tainly cannot boast much purity in its ways, — but 
because religion was left wholly to those who 
chose it as their life-work, and consequently the 
people needed perfect and holy men to show the 
way. Nowadays, when there are true Christians, 
men and women, who are " in the world, not of 
it," there are none who shine especially above their 
fellows. 

The saints of the Middle Ages are largely the 
result of the times in which they lived. No one 
could live a life of purity and holiness then with- 
out quitting entirely the outside world. As for the 
saints like Bernard and Francis, who worked in 
the world for the good of men, they could not 
have kept their purity of soul if they could not 



have fled to their cells and communed with God 
in secret. Again and again Bernard goes forth 
from the convent walls refreshed in spirit to en- 
counter the storm of the world ; and as often he 
returns worn with the conflict, and in need of 
secret communion with his Maker. All men need 
solitude as well as society ; how much more those 
whose life-work brought them in contact with the 
lowest of humanity, and whose strength was sapped 
away from them in the active life they felt it their 
duty to live ! Can we blame men, whose life-blood 
it was to be alone, for taking the vows of a monk 
and seeking the quiet of the convent walls ? 
Rather should we praise them for knowing their 
own weakness, and seeking for strength where 
alone it is to be found. 

There is no need nowadays of any one's follow- 
ing their example so strictly as to enter a convent 
and leave another to do what perhaps should be 
his own personal work. No doubt, many have 
sought and continue to seek the seclusion of the 
convent in order to shut out the world and its 
temptations ; but it is a question whether they are 
any the happier, or even as happy, as those who 
live in the world and do their appointed work, 
relying on God to give them strength to meet 
their temptations. 



THE INDEFINITE ARTICLE. 

Those days toward the latter part of June which 
Lowell characterizes as "perfect," are not calcu- 
lated to inspire a desire for study. The mind, no 
matter how vigorous in its normal state, becomes 
then in harmony with the languidness of nature. 
It likes to busy itself with no subtler problem than 
"What is so rare as a day in June?" and, " Oh, 
which were best, to roam or rest ? . . . Which 
life were best on summer eves ? " 

It was, therefore, with no little repugnance that, 
upon one of those dreamy days of early summer, 
I resigned myself to prepare for a rhetoric exami- 
nation. Having ensconced myself in the largest 
chair the library afforded, I began to remove the 
cobwebs from the early lessons of the year — les- 
sons that had long been consigned to the attic of 
my memory. 

"That form of expresssion is most excellent," 
— I had repeated this much to myself several 



Lasell Leaves. 



27 



times, but seemed to have difficulty in remember- 
ing the rest. The familiar objects in the room 
began to assume strange shapes, and the noise 
from the city gradually formed itself into a voice : 

" Well, why don't you finish ? " 

I became suddenly aware that I was not alone. 
Looking up, I encountered an unfamiliar face upon 
the opposite side of the table- It belonged to a 
very uninteresting looking person, with rather a 
dry expression, but still with, the bold appearance 
of one who is always pushing himself to the front. 

While I was thus engaged in analyzing his char- 
acter, he had been wandering around the room, 
looking in many of the books. He did not seem 
satisfied with his search. Returning to his former 
position, he took a survey of the rhetoric lying 
open before me, and then remarked, — 

" If you want to go, 1 suppose I shall have to 
take you." 

I regret to be obliged to state that the propriety 
of going anywhere with an entire stranger does 
not seem to have occurred to me, nor did I have 
the seemingly natural desire to know where I was 
going. I wished to escape the close room, and 
was not very particular how I accomplished my 
ends. 

" You see," resumed my visitor, " I am Mr. 
Preface, and having in my possession a synopsis 
of the whole of Rhetoric City, I am a good guide. 
If you would like to see some of the inhabitants, 
I shall be most happy to point them out to you." 

By this time, being prepared for anything this 
eccentric individual might do or say, I did not 
demur when he beckoned me to follow him from 
the room. 

" The cause of my being here," remarked Pref- 
ace, 'is simply this: the Indefinite Article, a 
very small child, attached herself to one of the 
Miss Nouns. There came a case where the latter 
thought to make a better impression alone ; so 
she quietly dropped Miss A, who has not been 
seen since. Mr. Language, the founder of Rhet- 
oric City, sent me in search of her; but as yet I 
have been unsuccessful." 

We were now traversing the streets of a large 
city. " The general style of which," so my guide 
said, "is such as yields its contained idea with the 
least expenditure of mental power." Something 
in that remark seemed familiar, but I could not 



remember the circumstances under which it and I 
had formerly met. 

"Ah," said my companion, as two dreamy- 
lo iking individuals rounded the corner, "there 
is Mr. Metaphor and Miss Simile. They show- 
off to best advantage on the occasion when Silence, 
like a poultice, comes to heal the blows of sound. 
Those two people in front of Simile are Mr. 
Like and Miss As. They are generally to be seen 
with her. That is the only point where she and 
Mr. Metaphor quarrel, as the latter does not ad 
mire her two friends. 

"There comes Miss Exclamation, qu ; te a 'girl 
of the period.' Ah ! I thought he could n't be far 
off," as a decidedly flashy youth, escorted by two 
bright looking ladies, came hurrying along. 

Upon inquiry I learned this to be Mr. Dash, 
"A very popular person, especially with Miss Ex- 
clamation. They say that at the last german given 
by Mrs. Grammar to her eight daughters, he — 
but never mind that ; ' boys will be boys,' and to 
believe all one hears is to be misinformed gen- 
erally." 

" Mr. Dash," continued my informer, " is often 
between the two Miss Ideas, as at present. That 
Idea family is invited everywhere, but they seldom 
go. People consider it quite an honor to know 
even one of them." 

I replied that I had never had the pleasure of 
meeting any of them. 

" So I should judge," was the reply. 

I wondered where all these people were hurry- 
ing with so much disorder and confusion. Noticing 
my inquiring glance, my guide exp'ained the cause. 

" Some school-girl is writing a composition in 
which," continued my companion, " the order is 
not so important as that the attendance shall be 
large. The laws of the city are not strictly en- 
forced on such occasions. If they were, I should 
not be in the city now, as my place is in the sub- 
urbs near the residence of Mr. Index." 

Just then a bright boy of about six approached, 
who was evidently endeavoring to suppress his 
tears. 

" What has distressed you, Interrogation ?" in- 
quired Preface. 

"Why, you see," responded the child, "some 
fellows were tossing a practical joke around, and 
the point hit me ! " 



28 



Lasell Leaves. 



My attention was then directed to the earnest 
conversation of two men whom I subsequently 
learned to be Mr. Principal Clause, and his cousin, 
Mr. Subordinate. " The latter is dependent on 
his cousin," said Preface; "poor relation, you 
see, but useful, as he often explains what other- 
wise in his cousin's remarks might seem peculiar. 

" I think this is the end, as there is young 
Period; he is always late, comes at the very end 
of everything — thinks it fashionable, I suppose." 

During this conversation, Mr. Preface had been 
carefully scrutinizing every passer in the endeavor 
to find Miss As. " I hope," he remarked, "that 
one of those erratic German Cases has not carried 
her off, as it would be impossible to — " 

""Well," said a loud voice, interrupting him, 
" the President's opinions on the tariff question 
are — " I awoke to find my father and uncle in 
angry discussion, — " The Indefinite Article," said 
I, finishing his sentence. H. R. G. 



A ROUND OF DELIGHT. 

Left Boston at 3 p. m., Oct. 9. Train an 
hour and a half late at Buffalo. 

The officials stand and look at the fifteen cars, 
impatient to be off, and turn and expectorate, 
and turn and look again. " Cut her in two right 
there," at last is shouted, and so I, on second sec- 
tion, am half an hour later yet. Thus my con- 
templated stop-over at Erie, to surprise Florence 
Bailey and Helen Davenport, — Lu. Hammond 
was also there, I heard later, — could not be 
made. I half expected them at the station, but 
nor looking up nor looking down did bring 'em, 
so I took a piece of the best apple pie I have 
tasted for some time, and went regretfully on. At 
Painesville, Ohio, " How long before local is 
due?" "Twenty minutes," says the tele- 
graph. Off I ran, up a block to the wide, well- 
shaded street of comfortable houses, up it to the 
pretty home of Annie Gage, had a pleasant chat 
with her mother and a lady whose name, in my 
haste, I did not learn, but who seemed at home 
there ; out again, and back to station, noticed the 
magnificent Planter Hotel opposite, boarded the 
local, and went on, sorry not to have had time 
to find Miss Burridge's home farther atown. 
" Want a kerridge ? " said a tall man at Wil- 
loughby station. '• Not a whole one. I '11 be 



content with a small portion ? " " Not so very 
small, either," said he, as he eyed my big satchel. 
Up we go through Main Street, and the driver 
soon contrived to mention the wedding, the event 
of the day, week, month, and I don't know but 
year, in this metropolis. "You her teacher?" 
said he, looking sidewise with a whole volume 
in his face, as if he could account now for the 
quality and quantity of erudition which Gertrude 
had brought from Boston. " No," said I, mod- 
estly, "only one of them ; she had forty or fifty." 
" Did she, though?" 

The brick hotel was filled with guests, so I 
could get no room, but the obliging landlord 
promised me a place to put on my white tie. After 
dinner I sauntered out past the Penfield mansion, 
and the beautiful triangle of maples behind the 
Soldiers' Monument, stopping to admire its 
wealth of color, to the Clement mansion. It was 
empty, but I found a warm welcome across the 
way from Mrs. Clement, and from Mabel's sweet- 
faced grandmother. They were all packed for 
Kansas. I talked to Rover about Mabel, and he 
understood me and made friends 

On return, I ventured to call at the centre of 
attraction, and found Gertrude and Mr. Seiberling 
trying to keep each other's courage up under 
Grace Seiberling's guidance. Gertrude's brother 
took me to the back yard where Messrs. Watkins, 
Houser, Christy, Wilson, and Charlie Seiberling 
were teaching Jennie Ninde how to shoot a Win- 
chester. It seemed to take a great deal of care- 
ful teaching, but Jennie was not afraid of the 
teaching or the shooting. Thence to the Boyce 
mansion, where I found Nancy Boyce's nice 
mother, and a big, lonesome house ; it did not 
seem so to me, but she said it was without Nancy. 
I also made friends with Trip, though he did not 
take to me quite so cordially as Rover. Back to 
the Penfields, where I found Mattie and Grace 
Henry and an army of Seiberlings, — some of 
whom we shall know better next year, — with 
whom I had a good visit, getting easily back to 
old times. 

At seven o'clock, we were again at the Penfield 
house, and, until twelve, had a most delightful 
time. The house, ample as it was, was full, and 
the time went only too fast. At eight o'clock the 
full Methodist Episcopal ceremony made " Frank 



Lasell Leaves. 



29 



and Gertrude, husband and wife together." They 
did n't seem much scared, and said their says 
without perceptible quaking. 

A good supper hour gave me time to have a 
valued talk with Gertrude. Soon after, off they 
ran, through the showers of rice and laughter and 
good wishes. After some visiting with Etta Jack- 
son and her French bonne, Hattie Seiberling 
Miles, our good old Hattie, Martha Prentice, and 
others, we betook ourselves to the hotel, 
changed in the parlor, and wended our way 
through the dark streets to the dark station, tak- 
ing train at two o'clock a. m. (so sorry about 
Mr. Beatty's new Dunlap hat), and reaching 
Fremont, O., at nine. Here, after breakfast, we 
found the father and mother of our sainted Julia 
Miller, and had a most charming day with them. 
In the afternoon Mr. Miller took me to see the 
wells of natural gas, the beautiful suburbs, and 
the fine estate and home of Ex-President Hayes, 
on whom we made a pleasant call. Met Mrs. 
Hayes twice in the streets, going about on her 
errands of good deeds just like any woman well 
interested in the business of her home and town. 

At seven p. m. was off for Chicago and Evans- 
ton. 

At Evanston, I had a most satisfying visit with 
mother, brothers, and sisters; made much fuss 
over the babies, old and new ; saw the dear 
friends of my youth. In Chicago, called on Hat- 
tie Woodcock, Hattie Clark Van Doren, Bertha 
Morrison, Helen Underwood, Nellie Brown Shat- 
tuck (address changed to 3925 Michigan Ave- 
nue), all of whom I saw, except dear old Hattie 
Clark — so sorry! Met Louise Knill in the street, 
and Eva B. Judd in the Art Gallery. Later, I 
found the father of Jessie Wilson, and through 
her brother's courtesy saw his great establishment. 
Also, Judge Gilbert. Unfortunately, Delia Davis's 
father and Mr. Gardner were not in. Lillie Pot- 
ter's mother has gone South for the winter ; Lillie 
is busy with her lecturing. Jessie Reece is in 
Europe. Maggie Cook, Mattie Fowler, and others, 
I could not reach. Mary Miller, Julia's sister, is 
in charge of her uncle's establishment, and 1 had 
a delightful hour with her. I meant to see all the 
Chicago girls, but distances in Chicago are some- 
thing dreadful, and use up time very fast. 

On our way home, we called at Salem, O., and 



had a delightful day with Ida Clark, formerly a 
teacher here, sister of Mrs. Prof. Luquiens ; and 
Jessie Boone Bonsall, whose two bright children 
are a witness to Jessie's good teaching at Lasell. 
Jessie is herself, and that is saying much. 

At Pittsburg we hoped to see Sophie White 
and Annie Harbaugh Strobel of Sewickly, but 
failed somehow. At Altoona we called on Daisy 
Lloyd's father, but did not find him ; spent a de- 
lightful afternoon at the dying bed of a beloved 
aunt who is only waiting the Father's good pleas- 
ure to call her home. 

In New York we saw Grace Richards's father, 
and Gussie Bente's, but Mr. Spellmeyer was out ; 
so was Mrs. Saunders. Saw also some good pic- 
tures which I coveted for Lasell's "Art Gallery." 
At her own nice home, No. 3 First Place, Brook- 
lyn, I had a good long talk with Grace Garland 
Etherington. Little as she is, she rules her home 
well, I judge. Dear girls, how I like to see you 
in your homes, busy, useful, helping in good 
works. Take hold! The world — your little 
world — needs intelligent Christian service, oh, so 
much ! Don't be idle, one of you, or selfish. Send 
news of yourselves and others to the Leaves. 
God bless you. C. C. B. 



IN MEMORIAM. 

Died at her home in East Hartford, Conn., Monday, 
Nov. 7, M. Louise Hayden. 

Only three weeks ago Lou bade us good-by, to 
go home for a short rest. How little we thought 
it was a final good-by, and that she was so soon 
to go to her long, last home. We cannot realize 
that such a change has taken place, and so still 
think of her at home. 

Her health was not good last year, indeed, 
she came here to try the effect of a change of 
climate for an illness already contracted, but she 
continued her studies until the close of the term, 
and anticipated taking up her school work with 
renewed energy after the summer vacation. She 
commenced this year buoyant and hopeful, but it 
was soon apparent to us all that she was not 
equal to hard study. 

She was in her eighteenth year, and would 
have been a graduate of '90; but God knew best, 
and already she is far wiser than any of us will 
be, even though we finish the course here with 



30 



Lasell Leaves. 



highest honors. Although she had been a mem- 
ber of the school only since January, she had 
many warm friends among the girls, and we all 
loved her ; for her patient, beautiful Christian 
character shone out on all those about her. 

I shall never forget the last Tuesday evening 
praver meeting she attended, and the verse she 
quoted, " Draw nigh unto God, and He will draw 
nigh unto thee." After we came to our room, 
she took up her Bible and read her favorite chap- 
ter, the Nineteenth Psalm. The first verse par- 
ticularly impressed her, "The heavens declare 
the glory of God." The evening happened to be 
a beautiful one, and she looked out and said, 
" How true that verse is — ' The heavens declare 
the glory of God ' ; one cannot look at the stars 
without seeing God's handiwork. I wonder what 
is beyond the stars." 

Dear Lou, you have now passed "beyond." 

I think it was the last Sunday she spent at 
Lasell that she spoke of dying. We had been 
talking of Carrie McEchron's sudden death, and 
how sad it seemed for a young person to be called 
away when there was so much to live for. Then 
Lou remarked how beautiful life was to her ; but 
said that if she thought she was not to live long, 
she should be reconciled to go. 

What a pure, true life washers ! Her influence 
will never be lost among her friends at Lasell. 

" How long we live, not years but actions tell." 

F. F. C. 



A SUMMER IN BOHEMIA. 

The '• summer " consisted of only seven and a 
half weeks, seven of which were passed in Frans- 
zensbad, and but a few days in Carlsbad and 
Prague. However, you may have some curiosity 
if not interest in knowing how one whiles away the 
long days in one of these famous watering places 
with which Germany and Bohemia are crowded. 
To mention Baden-Baden, Ems, Schwalbach, Carls- 
bad, Marienbad, and many others (their name is 
legion), certainly makes one think that the coun- 
try is one large bathing establishment. When one 
knows that thousands upon thousands of natives 
and foreigners frequent them during the season, 
it can easily be understood what an important 
place the baths hold in national life ; also what 



an excellent place it is to study human nature as 
seen in the Russian, French, Polish, Jew, English, 
Australian, German, and Turk even. 

As one day is simply a repetition of another, I 
will give you an outline of a day's work. 

In the first place, one must arm herself with 
glass cup and drinking-tube ; and these can be 
bought in every color, size, and shape imaginable. 
Many people think six o'clock none too early to 
take their first glass of water, but I was content 
with quarter before seven. Three glasses with an 
interval of fifteen minutes are taken before break- 
fast, and an hour between the last glass and 
breakfast. During this time, one walks about 
in the really lovely parks, listens to the music of 
the band, which plays from 6 to 8 a. m. and 4 to 
6 p. m. Or, if one prefers, it is easy to mingle 
with the crowd, where if you know no one. as my 
friend and I did not, you feel extremely lonely. 
It is very amusing, though, to watch these hun- 
dreds of human faces, and imagine characters 
to fit the faces, to watch peculiarities in conversa- 
tion and expression, and to notice costumes 
which were many and varied, from the simple 
Eger peasant-woman, to the startling peculiarity 
of some Parisian toilet. Drawing water through 
a glass tube does not, I confess, enhance any 
natural beauty of face or expression. 

From ten until one and from two until four are 
the bathing hours, and one has a variety of baths 
to choose from, from the bright sparkling Stahl- 
wasserbad to the horrible mud-bath. The latter 
consists of black mineral moor, mixed with warm 
spring water, to the consistency of porridge, and 
into this one must plunge, and remain covered for 
twenty minutes. Fortunately, it slips off of one 
like magic, and what seems so terrible at first, 
really becomes a luxurious pleasure at last. 

In the afternoon one takes book or work into 
the park to listen to the music and to drink a cup 
of coffee or chocolate, as one likes. About an hour 
before supper, another glass of water is taken 

We had our room in one house and went out for 
our dinners ; the breakfast and supper, which were 
very simple, were furnished by the Haus frau. 

In between the different exciting events of the 
day, we were supposed to rest, or to do nothing, 
and as we were exhausted and tired, we found it 
extremely easy to follow the latter injunction. 



Lasell Leaves. 



3* 



Eight o'clock was our bed hour, and as time 
really did hang heavily on our hands, we found 
it none too early. 

The Franszensbad waters are all cold, and not 
at all disagreeable — quite the contrary. 

The first three weeks were pleasant, the fourth 
and fifth began to drag, and the sixth and seventh 
interminable, so that the decision to go to Prague 
was extremely welcome. We left Franszensbad, 
its springs, mud-baths, poor music grasping ser- 
vants, with happy hearts, but with a great thank- 
fulness to have been there — none to be going 
away. 

Prague, with her hundred towers, churches, 
palaces, etc. , where every step brings up past 
history, is too interesting to pass over with a few 
words, so I will leave it untouched, except to say 
that what has been written in no way exaggerates 
the fascinations of this city, which Alex, von 
Humboldt ranks as one of the four most beauti- 
ful European cities, — Naples, Constantinople, 
Lisbon, and Prague. The praise of its beauty 
is somewhat overdone, but not of its " seeing- 
worthinesses," as our German friends would say ; 
too much cannot be said. 

Bohemia is a beautiful land, including wild 
mountain regions, as well as fertile plain and val- 
ley. Its people are wild and turbulent, I should 
judge, from those who emigrate. Catholicism 
reigns supreme, and had I wished it, I could 
have seen skulls, bones, and clothes belonging 
to numerous departed saints, all of which are 
miracle working. 

There is indeed great need for missionaries in 
European fields. Fanny L. Wiswall. 



POLITICAL NOTES. 

It is characteristic of President Cleveland's 
habits of mind that the number of his vetoes thus 
far is greater than the total number of vetoes by 
all the Presidents who preceded him. All the 
Presidents, from Washington to Arthur, have used 
this power only one hundred and ten times. 
President Cleveland has vetoed, during a single 
term of Congress, and during a time of excep- 
tional tranquillity, one hundred and forty-three 
bills. 

To see Mr. Gladstone walk a mile on the turf 



is said to be a rich treat. Even in the streets of 
London he is the most graceful and nimble pedes- 
trian one would meet in a day. 

A dinner was given in Paris, Oct. 28, in cele- 
bration of the anniver-ary of the dedication of the 
statue of "Liberty Enlightening the World." 
Mr. James G. Blaine was one of the American 
guests. 

»-•-» 

SCIENTIFIC NOTES. 

Prof. Loisette's new system of memory train- 
ing, taught by correspondence at 237 Fifth 
Avenue, New York, seems to supply a general 
want. He has had two classes at Yale of two 
hundred each, two hundred and fifty at Meriden, 
three hundred at Norwich, one hundred Colum- 
bia law students, four hundred at Wellesley Col- 
lege, and four hundred at University of Pennsyl- 
vania, etc. Such patronage, and the indorsement 
of such men as Mark Twain, Dr. Buckley, Prof. 
William R. Harper, of Yale, etc., place the claim 
of Prof. Loisette upon the highest ground. 

An engine specially constructed to use petro- 
leum as fuel is successfully drawing trains be- 
tween Alexandria and Cairo. It is estimated that 
a yearly saving of $250,000 in the cost of fuel 
would be effected by this railway, by the substitu- 
tion of petroleum for coal. 

A snake two feet long, sleek and beautifully 
spotted, and having, it is said, no eyes, was 
recently found in the bottom of the shaft of the 
Pana, 111., coal mine, five hundred feet below 
the surface of the earth. 



ART NOTES. 

Saturday, Oct. 29, Miss Anne Whitney's 
statue of Leif Erickson, the supposed Icelandic 
discoverer of America, was unveiled in Boston. 
Many prominent persons, including representative 
Scandinavian citizens of the United States, were 
present at the dedicatory services in Faneuil 
Hall. The statue represents a young man stand- 
ing in the attitude of one who discovers land in the 
distance. He is shading his eyes with his left 
hand, while his right grasps a speaking horn at 
his side. He wears a shirt of mail, with crossed 



32 



Las ell Leaves, 



breast-plates and a studded belt from which a 
knife hangs in an ornamented sheath. The feet 
are shod in sandals, and the flowing hair falls 
from under a casque. From one end of the pedes- 
tal projects the prow of a Norse galley, and from the 
other, the stern. It is arranged as a fountain. On 
one side of the pedestal is inscribed in Runic 
characters, " Leif , the discoverer, son of Erik, 
who sailed from Iceland, and landed on this 
Continent A. D. iooo." Bronze tablets are 
mounted on two faces of the pedestal ; one rep- 
resents the landing of Erickson, the other shows 
him telling the story of his discoveries. 

Once more Munkaczy holds sway in the 
Twenty-third Street Tabernacle building. This 
time it is " Christ on Calvary." The canvas is 
even larger than " Christ Before Pilate," which it 
resembles in color and technique ; but of the two 
pictures it is much the less effective in composi- 
tion. Critics say that, notwithstanding its mas- 
terly brush work, this picture, in point of true 
religious feeling, is inferior to the efforts of the 
early pre-Raphaelites to represent the Crucifix-' 
ion. 



MAJOR AND MINOR. 



Mme. Marie Roze, while singing in opera in 
Dublin, recently, requested her friends as a par- 
ticular favor to refrain from throwing bouquets to 
her while she was upon the stage, but to send all 
flowers to her residence, whence she would for- 
ward them to the hospitals. 

Edward Lloyd is considered, by the London 
Musical World, to have " a warmth of expression, 
and charm of voice and style, that no other living 
singer can approach," as shown in the tenor's 
interpretation of " Lend Me Your Aid," from 
Gounod's "The Queen of Sheba." 

Among the important works by American com- 
posers that will be heard in Pittsburg this season, 
is J. K. Paine's cantata, "The Nativity," which 
will be sung by the Handel and Haydn Society. 

Friday evening, Dec. 2. Music Hall, Mme. 
Etelka Gerster, Mme. Helene Hastreiter, Miss 
Nettie Carpenter, M. Bjorkstein Orchestra. 



TEMPERANCE. 

" For God and Home and Native Land." 

The National Woman's Christian Temperance 
Union, with its thirty-eight auxiliary State and 
nine Territorial Unions, beside that of the District 
of Columbia, is the largest society ever composed 
exclusively of women, and conducted entirely by 
them. 

It has been organized in every State and Terri- 
tory of the nation, and locally in about ten thou- 
sand towns and cities. Great Britain, Canada, and 
Australia have also organized. As a general esti- 
mate (the returns being altogether incomplete), 
we think the number of local unions in the United 
States about 10,000, including Young Women's 
Christian Temperance Unions, with a following 
of about 200,000, besides numerous juvenile organ- 
izations. This society is the local descendant 
of the great Temperance Crusade of 1873, and 
is a union of Christian women for educating the 
young ; forming a better public sentiment ; reform- 
ing the drinking classes ; transforming by the 
power of Divine Grace those who are enslaved by 
alcohol ; and for securing the entire abolition of 
the liquor traffic. 

"Why should I belong to the W. C. T. U. ? " 
is a question busy women ask each other, and 
ask themselves. 

There are two distinct reasons why every intel- 
ligent Christian woman should, because of her re- 
lation to the home, belong to the W. C. T. U. 

1 st. Home is the centre and source of life, 
and woman is the home keeper. Whatever con- 
cerns the home, therefore, is of vital importance to 
her. 

2d. The enemies of home are her enemies, 
and she is called upon to defend both it and her- 
self against them. Intemperance is acknowledged 
to be the greatest enemy of the home ; the 
leader of armies in whose wake many deadly foes 
follow. 



EXCHANGE NOTES. 

Owing to the carelessness of the exchange 
editor, the October Leaves was not sent to the 
Williams Weekly, but we trust that it will be re- 
ceived on time this month. The Weekly is al- 
ways bright, and we should be very sorry to lose 
it as an exchange. 



Lasell Leaves. 



33 



The College Rambler for Oct. 8 has a very good 

article on Dante, " The Italian Poet." 

We copy the following poem from the Tufto- 

nian : — 

BY CHANCE. 

They met by chance ; a wayward fate 
Till then had kept them wide apart. 

He had no thought of love or hate; 
She hardly knew she had a heart. 

They met by chance; the sinking sun 

Cast lengthening shadows on the ground, 

The long June day was nearly done — 
The twilight dim was gathering round. 

They met by chance ; a fateful chance, 
That brought them nearer, nearer still ; 

Each gave the other a startled glance, 
Each felt a momentary thrill. 

They met by chance ; a swift, sharp pain 
Unnerves them as they think of that ! 

They trust they '11 never meet again — 
The 'cyclist and the brindled cat ! 

The wrapper of the Princetonian is almost al- 
ways so put on that it is nearly impossible to re- 
move it without tearing the paper. It surely 
could not take much longer to do the paper up 
properly. 

The article called " Novi Homines," in the 
Argosy for November, is probably meant to be 
witty. If so, it falls far short of its purpose. 
Most of it is slangy and vulgar. 



LOCALS. 
Sparks from the German table : — 
Lasell Leaves : the lettuce we have at dinner. 

We also have a descendant of Marsechal Niel 
at the German table. 

This year the usual Halloween celebration 
was omitted, but that did not prevent certain 
among us, who are mischievously inclined, from 
having considerable fun at the expense of our 
neighbors. Unsuspecting new girls found their 
rooms in the wildest confusion, and sentimental 
Seniors slept on wedding cake. 

Horseback, riding has become quite popular 
this year among the girls, particularly by moon- 
light. Wild looking apparitions, with "dis- 
levelled " heads, may be seen prowling around at 
uncanny hours. With gymnastics, breathers, and 
horseback rides, the Lasell girls ought to be 
healthy, and they are, too, on the whole. 



For unparalleled excellence in getting things 
crooked, the present Grecian History Class of 
Lasell Sem. for "young women " excels. Accord- 
ing to their statement, Mr. Areopagus dictated a 
code of laws far better than Solon's ; and a man 
called Marathon led the Persians to battle. 

The rate at which Lasell girls are getting 
married lately is truly astonishing. Even the 
class of '87 has broken its record ere the new 
year has come among us to stay. One of its 
members has assumed new responsibilites. This 
outlook is very encouraging for succeeding classes, 
and already '88 and '89 have begun to speculate 
as to who will be the first of their number to 
" desire presents." The beaming looks of the 
Freshmen show that they, too, have had thoughts 
for the future. 

" I wait for my story, the birds cannot sing it, 

Not one as he sits on the tree, 
The bell cannot ring it, 
But long years, oh, bring it 

Such as I wish it to be." 

Mademoiselle. — " Arrachez mes cheveux." 
Bright Senior {who has been horseback rid- 
ing the night before). " Stop my horse." 

The Harvest Festival has become one of the 
" days which we celebrate." This year Oct. 
15 was the time chosen. The celebration took 
place in the gymnasium, which was tastefully 
trimmed for the occasion with grains and autumn 
leaves, and presented a very attractive appear- 
ance. During the evening, refreshments were 
served, to which we all did justice. But the 
crowning feature of the evening was the band 
from Boston, which discoursed sweet strains 
while we tripped the " light fantastic toe " or 
glided through what Dick Swiveller would call 
" the mazy." Taken altogether, the evening was 
very enjoyable, and will be long remembered by 
all. 

The chapel has been greatly improved by the 
addition of opera chairs. They add much to the 
appearance of the room, and are also more con- 
ducive to sleep than the former way in which we 
were seated. 

The following club items may be of interest : — 

The clubs S. D. and Lasellia have started 

auspiciously this year, and everything seems to 



34 



Lasell Leaves. 



promise well. Both clubs have added a large 
number to their ranks, and intend doing some 
good literary work. 

The present officers of the S. D. Society 
are : President, Miss Wallace ; Vice-President, 
Miss C. Clark; Secretary, Miss Lloyd ; Treasurer, 
Miss Feabody ; Critic, Miss Harwood ; Usher, 
Miss Barbour. 

On Oct. 15, the " S. D.'s " celebrated their 
tenth birthday by initiating new members into the 
mysteries of the society. 

All the arrangements for the occasion were 
especially felicitous. On the piano stood a 
beautiful bouquet of pinks from Miss Packard, 
a former S. D., with her " best wishes to the old 
girls and new." 

At the appointed hour a band of maidens, be- 
witchingly arrayed in ''gym." costumes, appeared 
at the club-room door. No doubt their minds 
were chaotic with visions of the goat, gridiron, 
and the greased pole. But all the orators 
who have ever addressed the young women of 
Lasell Seminary will be glad to know that these 
elect maidens preserved that calm, self-possessed, 
gracious demeanor which has been so often rec- 
ommended to them from the rostrum. They 
"dared and again dared and without end dared," 
until they became, as we hope, loyal S. D.'s. To 
judge from externals, every one of these twenty- 
five might have been " self-governed." But we 
do not judge from externals simply, neither do 
we, like the Beacon, take number and volume of 
"screams " as the standard of thorough initiation. 
But nine o'clock came too soon, and the members 
slowly left, only longing for the time to come when 
they shall begin debating. 

The last election of officers in the Lasellia 
Club stands as follows : President, Miss Bogart ; 
Vice-President, Miss H. White; Secretary, Miss 
Hathaway ; Treasurer, Miss Cole ; Critic, Miss 
Stafford ; Guard, Miss G. White ; Assistant 
Guard, Miss Gage ; Executive Committee, Misses 
Gwinnell, Raum, and Law. 

On the evening of Oct. 22 the Lasellia Club 
added to its numbers twenty-two expectant girls. 
The rites of the initiation were enjoyed by the new 
and old members alike, and the evening closed 
with mutual congratulations. 



PERSONALS. 

May Bigelow is at her home in Worcester, but 
expects to spend a part of the winter in New 
York. 

We hear of Jennie Ninde as " maid of honor " 
at Miss Penfield's wedding. 

Florence Bailey writes pleasantly from her 
home in Erie, Pa. 

Susie M. Drew, here in '76, of Plymouth, 
Mass., visited us in October. 

Miss Elizabeth Horsford, of Clinton, Iowa, 
and Miss Lizzie Whipple, '85, of Boston, visited 
Lasell. 

We are glad to see Judge Park well again, and 
going to and fro as was his wont, between office 
and home, on the trains. School-girls are not 
counted in, but may we not only say, God bless 
him? We hope to see him and Mrs. Park often 
this year. 

A beautiful little memorial of Miss McEchron, 
from the pen of her uncle, Rev. Dr. Hulburd, is 
on our table. Tender and truthful words they 
are, which we should be glad to reproduce here 
entire, if we had space. 

Miss May Miller, mother, and three sisters 
are in Boston. May is here for the purpose of 
studying elocution. 

Miss Jennie Brown is soon to be in New York, 
and afterwards in Boston, to study elocution with 
Miss Call. 

Miss Ada Langley is to teach at the Boston 
School of Oratory this winter. 

Alice House, '83, has written two very reada- 
ble articles from Chautauqua during the past sum- 
mer, which have appeared in Zion's Herald. 

Clementina Butler spent five weeks in Alaska 
during July and August. In her own delightful 
way she also has told us in the columns of Zion's 
Herald of her summer sojourn. 

Ida Sibley, '84, has charge of the drawing de- 
partment in the public schools of Warren, Mass. 

Lillie and Nellie Packard spent the "glorious 
Fourth " with Polly Stebbins, at Troy, N. Y. 



Lasell Leaves. 



35 



Lu Brown, '82, has moved from Evansville, Ind., 
to Oakland, Cal., where her home is 17 15 Seward 
Street. We wish her success in her life in the 
far West. 

Minnie Nickerson, '82-4, has taken up kin- 
dergarten study in Boston. 

Florence Ryan, '83-5, who graduated at 
Ogontz in June, is studying kindergarten 
methods of instruction with Mrs. Kempton, a 
sister of Miss Call. 

Etta and Jennie Jackson met Alice House at 
Chautauqua this season. 

Edith Andrews is to spend the coming winter 
in Chicago. 

Anne and Josie Wallace have returned from a 
trip to California. 

Lill and Stella Wadhams, Lill and Nellie 
Packard, and Sophie White were together at 
Wyoming Camp Ground, Wyoming, Pa. 

Carrie Waite has entered Smith College this 
year, and is to study music, elocution, and philos- 
ophy. 

Anna Newkirk, of Jackson, Mich., visited 
Lasell in the summer vacation ; also, her old 
school friends, Annie Brown and Annie Williams. 

Mrs. William T. Bonner — Fanny Baker, of 
1880 — has moved to Omaha, Neb. She has two 
bright children, whose pictures we saw at Grace 
Fritley Pennell's in Portland, Me. We were also 
shown a nice painting in water colors by Mrs. 
Louise Fribley Dann, of 47 Edward Street, Colum- 
bus, Ohio. Mrs. Pennell has a very pleasant 
home, and a nice baby. We also met Mrs. Jennie 
West Atwood and her husband. They have a 
nice home near the Portland Park. 

Mrs. Emily Peabody Stewart, of the class of 
1882, is now living in St. Louis. 

Mrs. Ida Mack Mansfield made us a flying 
visit, Oct. 20. 

Eva Wise came to see " that nice Milford girl," 
Amy Harris. 

Eugenia Hart stopped here on her way to 
California, with her mother and brother. They 
are going for the benefit of the latter's health. 

Mamie Harmon Hellier, of New Haven, 
Conn., here in '83, whom we last saw in Berlin, 



is, we learn, now at No. 1 Kirk Street, West Rox- 
bury. We hope she will come out here. 

Miss Mary Marshall, late of Colorado, and 
a former pupil of Lasell, was married on the 
evening of Nov. 2 to Mr. Edward Payson Call, of 
the Boston Hirald. Mr. Call is a brother of our 
teacher of elocution. The wedding took place at 
St. Paul's Church, in Boston. Rev. Dr. Court 
ney, of St. Paul's, performed the ceremony, and 
her father gave the bride away. 

Lasell was well represented as to numbers. 
Prof, and Mrs. Bragdon were present, with Miss 
Carpenter, Miss Ransom, and Miss Cushman. 
Among former pupils were the Misses Emily and 
Tessie Shift, Miss Florence Ryan, Miss Lizzie 
Whipple, Miss Hosford, Miss Ada Langley, Miss 
May Miller, Mrs. Vickery (once Abby Davis), 
and Miss Abbie Hill, we believe, but are not cer- 
tain. She meant to be there. The Newtons sent 
many guests, naturally, for Mr. Call lives at New- 
tonville,and after the bridal trip the happy pair will 
settle down in their home on Highland Avenue. 

Married at Westborough, Mass , Oct. 25, 
1887, Miss Etta May Kelley, '82, and Mr. Louis 
Emil Derefeld. 

Miss Hattie Webber, of Holyoke. here in 
1880, is engaged to Mr. Dwight Goddard, of 
Worcester. 

Miss Hattie Robbins, class of '87, was mar- 
ried Nov. 1, at Union, Me., to Mr. Charles Ruse. 
Their new home is in Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Married at Haverhill, Mass., Nov. 17, Miss 
Martha Sargent and Mr. Albert S. West. 

Hon. E. M. West, grandfather of Miss Vir- 
ginia Prickett, died very suddenly on Monday, 
Oct. 31, at Edwardsville, 111., of which place he 
was an eminent and beloved citizen, as also one 
of the most widely and favorably known of public 
men in Southern Illinois Miss Prickett had just 
gone to New York, and was summoned by first 
return train, reaching home in time to be present 
at the funeral service. 



OLD GIRLS, ATTENTION! 
We have three silver spoons which the owneis 
may have by sending a postal card to Lasell Sem- 
inary. The spoons are marked, M. E Avery, M. C, 
and M., the first two being in script, and the lat- 
ter in Old English. 



36 



Lasell Leaves. 



FRENCH 

SHIRTINGS. 



ChGVlDtS, 

Madras, 
English & 
French 
Flannels 
& Silk 
Shirtings. 



Pdp Tennis, 

" Eailwaj Oar, 

" Steamer Trav- 
" elling, 

" Hunting, 

" Wishing, 

" Yachting, 

Always in stock or 

made to special 

measure. 



NOYES BROS. 

Washington and Summer Sts. 

BOSTON, U. S. A, 



London Tan Street Gloves, warranted, at 
$1.35, at Noyes Bros. 

Dress Shirts, for Weddings, for Receptions, 
for Dinner Parties, with Collars, Cuffs, and 
Cravats, in the latest English styles. Plain 
French Bosoms, fine Embroidered Spots, 
Figures and Cords, at Noyes Bros. 

English Cheviots, English and French Flan- 
nels, Silt and Wool and Pure Silk Shirt- 
ings, for Tennis, for Steamer Travelling, 
for Hunting and Fishing, for Railway arid 
Yachting. Always in stock or made to 
special measure, at Noyes Bros. 

English Mackintosh Coats, for Ladies and 
Gentlemen, at Noyes Bros. 

English Rugs and Shawls, for Steamer and 
Railway use, at Noyes Bros. 

English Flannel, Blanket and Shawl Wraps, 

for the Sick-Room, for Steamer and Railway 
Travelling. For the bath and house use they 
are indispensable. $3.25 to $65.00. 

English Neckwear, at Noyes Bros. 



Underwear and Hosiery, in Pure Silk, Lambs' 
Wool, Merino, Balbriggan and English Cotton, 
for early fall wear, at Noyes Bros. 

English Flannel Pajamas, Long Flannel 
Night Shirts and Wraps, for steamer and rail- 
way travelling, at Noyes Bros. 



Full Evening Dress Shirts, 
Collars and Cravats 

Constantly on hand, for Dinner Parties, 
Weddings, or any occasion. 

The present English Fashion of shirts made 
with Linen Cords and Spot Bosoms may be 
had of Noyes Bros. 



ENGLISH DRESSING GOWNS, 

JACKETS AND WRAPS. 



Lawn Tennis Shirts, Coats and Hose. 



TENNIS BELTS AND CAPS in Stock and 
made to measure from choice styles of ENG- 
LISH FLANNELS. 

GLOVES of Every Description, for Dress, 
Street, Driving, and the famous London Tan, 
at $1.35, at Noyes Bros. 



JURORS' A WARD for beauty of work- 
manship and design, and distinguished 
excellence in the mamifacture 
of Shirts, to 

NOYES BROS. 

Washington and Summer Streets, 
BOSTON, U, S. A. 



ESTABLISHED 1817- 



JOHN H. PRAY, SONS & CO. 

Importers, Jobbers, Retailers anl Manufacturers' Agents, 

Carpetings, Mattings, Oil Cloth, 

ORIENT JlL RUGS, 

CARPETS AND UPHOLSTERY. 



558 and 560 Washington St., 

30 to 34 Harrison Ave. Extension, 



BOSTON. 



113 Worth. Street 



NEW YORK. 



Lasell Leaves. 



37 



A. STOWELL & CO. 

24 Winter Street, Boston. 



^oirie of our Specialties : 

Bohemian Garnet Jewelry. 

Amber Beads and Ornaments. 

Tortoise-Shell Hair Pins. 

Choice Leather Goods. 

Oxidized Silver Jewelry. 

Fans for all occasions. 

Pearl Opera Glasses. 

Fine Gold Jewelry. 

Wedding Presents in Clocks, Vases and 
Bronzes. 

LATEST NOVELTIES IN ALL DEPARTMENTS. 
Lowest Prices. 






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YOUNG LADIES' 

BOOTS, SHOES AND SLIPPERS, 

Stylish and Durable at Moderate Prices. 

GYMNASIUM SHOES A SPECIALTY 

Thayer, McNeil k Hodgkins, 

47 TEMPLE PL. - - BOSTON. 

ARTHUR P. SCHMIDT & CO. 

IMPORTERS OF AND DEALERS IN 

FOREIGN AND AMERICAN 

Sheet Music. 

Sole Agents lor Lilolffs celebrated Edition of 
Classical and Modern Music. 

13 AND 15 WEST ST., BOSTON. 

Catalogues sent free on application. 

BOSTON FOREIGN BOOK STORE, 

BOOKS IN ALL FOREIGN LANGUAGES, 

CARL SCHOENHOF, 

144 Tremont Street - - - - One Plight Up. 

PALMER, BACHELDER & CO. 

HAVE 



CLASS RINGS, QUEEN CHAINS, 

Gold Bangles, Bracelets, Bonnet Pins, Lace Pins, 

Brooches, Collar Studs, Sleeve Buttons, 

Cuff Fasteners, 

OPERA GLASSES, FRENCH CLOCKS, 

Choice Articles in Pottery, 

AND 

PRESENTATION SILVER WARE, 

AT 

NO. 146 TREMONT ST., BOSTON. 

PALMER, BACHELDER & CO. 

ESTABLISHED I84-0. 

Isaac Locke & Company, 

Produce Commission Merchants, 

And Dealers in 

FOREIGN and DOMESTIC FRUITS 

97, 99 and 101 Faneuil Hall Market, and Basement 18 Soutli Side, 

BOSTON - - - MASS. 

Telephone Connection, 



38 



Lasell Leaves. 



x WEBER Sx 

25, 27 TEMPLE PLACE BOSTON, 

J±NT> 33 WEST STREET, 

Ladies' and Gents' Restaurant, 

Oysters and Salads a Specialty. 

OPEN AFTER THEATRES. 

Caterer for Wedding Breakfasts, Lunches, Dinner and Evening Parties 

and Receptions. Also, Club Suppers at Short Notice 

and Reasonable Prices. 

S. ^A7\ BAILEY, 

— DEALER IN 

WATCHES, JEWELRY, SILVERWARE, ETC. 

353 Washington Street, Boston. 

Jewelry Neatly Repaired. Also, Monograms on Coin Pieces. Personal 
Attention given to Repairing Fine Watches. 

ESTABLISHED 1847- 



AARON R. GAY & CO. 

ISTo. 122 State Street, Boston, 

STATIONERS 

AND 

BUNK BOO K MANUF ACTURERS, 

First-Class Account Books of any desired 
pattern made to order. 

S. S. GAY. EDWIN W. GAY. 

JUST WHAT HAS BEEN WANTED. 

A LADIES' LUNCH ROOM 

HAS BE FN OPENED AT 

23 AVON STREET, BOSTON. 

A quiet, neat place, where a nice Lunch can be had at a very reason- 
able price. All the ladies say, " Isn't it nice ?" 

T. D. COOK, Caterer. 

ALSO, 

Wedding and other Parties 

Served with the Choicest Viands, and by Competent Waiters. 

SUPERIOR ICE-CREAM 

DELIVERED AT REASONABLE PRICES. 



-f- 



-THE 



YOUTH'S COMPANION, 

A WEEKLY PAPER FOR 

YOUNG PEOPLE and the FAMILY, 

It aims to be a favorite in every family — looked for eagerly 
by the young folks, and read with interest by the older. Its purpose is to 
interest while it amuses; to be judicious, practical, sensible, and to have 
really permanent worth, while it attracts for the hour. 

It is handsomely illustrated, ai d has for contributors some of 
the most attractive writers in the country. 

Subscription Price, $1.75. Specimen copies sent free. Please 
mention in what paper you read this advertisemei t. 

PERRY MASON &. CO. 

41 TEMPLE PLACE, BOSTON, MASS. 



FINE FURS. 

The best quality of all kinds of Furs in popular use. 

Seal English Jackets, 

Seal Dolman Wraps. 

Seal Sacques. 

We give particular attention to orders by measure, and using the 
richest and most durable of genuine Alaska Seals, assure the fullest 
satisfaction in quality and fit. 

The fashionable 

BLACK BEAR BOAS, 

of exquisite fineness and beauty, made from skins of rare quality. 

Fur Collars, Capes, Cuffs, Boas, 

Hats, Sleighing Hoods and Gloves, 

FUR TRIMMINGS. 

Gent/emeu's Fur-lined Overcoats. 

Fur Mats and Carriage Robes. 

Joseph A. Jackson, 

412 Washington Street - - Boston. 

Established 1825. 

NATHAN NEAT & CO. 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

-.-^X^^- "FIISTE -*-^r«- 







BASKET TRUNKS AND STEAMER CHAIRS. 
Stateroom and Light-Weight Trunks for European Travel 



SEND FOR ILLUSTRATED CATALOGUE. 



^6 WASHINGTON ST., BOSTON, MASS. 

The Archway Bookstore, 

365 WASHINGTON STREET, BOSTON. 



Our stock is one of the largest and most complete to be found in the 
city, including books in all departments of literature, and our prices are 
noted as being always the lowest. 

Catalogues of Books at Special Reductions 

SENT FREE TO ANY ADDRESS. 

DeWolfe, Fiske & Company. 



Lasell Leaves. 



39 



EDWIN C. BURT & CO.'S 

FINE SHOES AND SLIPPERS 

FOR LADIES AND CHILDREN 

ARE THE BEST SHOES MADE. 



Fit Perfectly. 
Easy on the Feet, 
Superior in Styta 



Cost no More 

Than any Other 

FLie Shoes. 




For sale by leading retail shoe dealers in nearly every city throughout the United States and 
Canada. All widths of Lasts, any style of Shoe, Sole, Toe, or Heel. If you cannot 
get our make of shoes from your dealers, send address for directions how to procure them. 

EDWIN C. BURT & CO., Manufacturers, 

USTZEW YORK. 

SPECIAL AOENTS IN BOSTON, 

Jordan, Marsh & Co., Washington St. 



Mr. JOSEPH A. HILLS 

has removed to more commo- 
dious music rooms in 

HOTEL PELHAM, 
Cor. Tremont and Boylston Sts., 

BOSTON, MASS., 

where he will be pleased to meet 
his pupils and others for pro- 
fessional engagements. 

Competent assistants under Mr. 
Hills's supervision will attend to 
the instruction of those less ad- 
vanced who may desire lessons 
at reduced rates. 



Conductors, Concert, Opera and 
Church Singers, Pianists, Organ- 
ists, Accompanists and Teachers 
supplied at the 

MUSIC TEACHERS' BUREAU, 

HOTEL PELHAM, 

BOSTON, MASS. 



COMER BROTHERS' CO. 
piai}ofort^/r\ai)ufy 

14tli St. and 9th Ave., New York. 

Clear, silvery, even tone through- 
out. Durable and elegant design. 
Indorsed by the profession. 

BOSTON WAREROOMS, 

Hotel Pelham. 



THE "PEERLESS" FOUNTAIN PEN 




IS THE PERFECTION OF FOUNTAIN PENS. 

Is a hard rubber holder fitted with a 16 k. gold pen of the best manufacture, and will never wear out. It will write ten thousand words with one 
filling of ink, and for taking lectures, etc., it is indispensable. There is no loss of time in dipping ink as with the ordinary pen, as the " Peerless " 
has a perfect, even and uninterrupted flow of ink, and is the best fountain pen manufactured. Price, $2.00. 

The Cross Stylographic Pen, Stylographic Ink. All styles of Stylographic, Fountain, and Gold Pens repaired. 



THE CROSS PEN CO., 306 Washington St. 



BOSTON, MASS. 



1TEXT IDOOia TO OLD SOUTH CHTjrEaCII. 



4 o 



Lasell Leaves. 



C. H. CODMAN & CO. 

Photographic Material, 

PICTURE and FRAME DEALERS' 

- < SUPPLIES »* 
Wholesale and Retail Framing 

AMATEUR PHOTOGRAPHIC APPARATUS. 

34 BROMFIELD STREET, 

BOSTON - - ■'- MASS. 

W. H. FRENCH & CO. 

PLUMBERS, GAS FITTERS, 

AND 

SANITARY ENGINEERS. 

JUDSON'S BUILDING, OPP. RAILROAD STATION 

WEST NEWTON. 



All Work Promptly Attended to and Warranted Satisfactory. 

LIVERY, HACK, 



-AJSTD 



BOARDING STABLE. 

ESTABLISHED 1861. 

S. F. CATE, WEST NEWTON. 



Barge "City of Newton." 

Boat Sleigh "Snow Bird." 

H. H. NEWELL, 

DEALER IN 

BOOTS, SHOES i RUBBERS. 

Auburn Street, Auburndale, Mass. 



ION'S HERALD. 

A Weekly Religious Journal. 

The Oldest Methodist Paper in the World.. 

Rev. B. K. PEIRCE, D. D., Editor. 



It has more than two hundred contributors. All departments well 
organized and furnishing interesting reading matter for all classes, having 
Religious, Secular, Domestic and Foreign Intelligence, also an Agricul- 
tural Department, second to no paper of its class. 

For Business Men, it is one of the Best Advertising Mediums. 
Read by probably 50,000 people weekly in New England. Address, 



KLONZO S. 3nZeeD. PUBLISHGR, 
36 BROMFIELD ST., BOSTON, MASS. 

AIjUZN Sc BARRY, 

House and Sign. Painters, Grlazing, G-raining» 

Kalsomining and. "Whitening. 

Paints, Oils and. "Varnishes constantly on hand. 

WASHINGTON ST. (near R. R. Crossing), WEST NEWTON. 

C. T. Allen. D. Barry. 

H. H. HUNT, 

CARPENTER AND BUILDER, 

WEST NEWTON, MASS. 
Shop near E, R. Crossing. P. 0. Box 235, 

WARH fc Pfl CARRIAGE AND WAGON BUILDERS, 

H nil U O. U U. , Cor. Elm and Washington Sts. , near City Hall, 

"WEST WEWTONT. 
Fine Carriages and Wagons of any description built to order and War- 
ranted to give satisfaction. Carriage Painting and Repairing in all its 
branches promptly and thoroughly executed at fair prices. The Repair- 
ing of Fine Carriages a Specialty. 

Carriages Sent for and Returned Free of Charge. 

Boston Gossamer Rubber Co. 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

Gossamer Clothing. 

LEATHER COATS AND VESTS, 

HOOP-SKIRTS AND BUSTLES. 

611 Washington St,, Boston, Mass. 

S. KLOI'S, Treasurer. 

B. G. BAKER, 

COAL AND WOOD. 

Auburndale and West Newton. 



Lasell Leaves. 




THOMAS HALL, 

MAHOTACTUBIlia 

Electrician 



■AHD' 



Optician. 



Manufacturer and Importer of 

Telegraphic, Electric, Mag- 
netic, Galvanic, Optical 
and Meteorological 
Instruments. 

Chemicals, Chemical and Philo- 
sophical Apparatus of all Descrip- 
tions, illustrated Cutalogue of 
each Department. 



il Hall's Pat. Medical Batteries. 



19 EHOMFIELD ST., BOSTON, MASS. 

1335, Daniel Davit, Jr. 1819, Palmar 6 Hall. 1SSS, Thomas Hall. 

WADSWORTH & PICKERING, 

COMMISSION MERCHANTS, AND JOBBERS IN 

BUTTER, CHEESE, EGGS, ETC. 

STALL, 89 QUINCY MARKET, BOSTON. 
Briggs Wadsworth. F. A. Pickering- 

CHARLES H. WHITING, Formerly Hall & Whiting, 

STATIONER and BLANK BOOK MANUFACTURER 

Importer and Jobber. Publisher and Book Seller. School and Miscel- 
laneous Books. Crane's Fine Stationery. American, English, French 
and German Fancy and Staple Stationery. Weston's Ledger Papers. 

163 and 170 Devonshire Street. Eoston. 



FROST & ADAMS, 

Importers of, and Vi'Lolesala and Retail Dealers la 

ARTISTS' MATERIALS, 

DECORATIVE ART NOVELTIES, ART 
POTTERY, ETC. 



Ebonized Panels. 

Winsor & Newton's Colors. 

German Colors. 

French Colors. 

Tucker & Green's Colors. 

Sketch Blocks. 

Plaques of all kinds. 

China Colors. 

Mirrors for Decorating. 

Artists* Boxes. 

Artists' Brushes. 

Artists' Canvas. 

Handbooks on Art. 

Studies of all kinds. 

Lustra Painting Materials. 



Water-Colors. 

Bronzes. 

Brocades. 

Spangles. 

China for Decorating. 

Paper Panels. 

Tambourines. 

Repousse Materials. 

Canvas Stretched. 

Drawing Instruments. 

Plaque Rims. 

Artists' Easels. 

Drawing Paper. 

Materials for Tapestry, etc. 

Kensington Painting Materials. 



SCHOOLS # STUDENTS SUPPLIED 

AT LOW FIGURES. 

37 CORNHILL - - BOSTON. 

SEND FOR A CATALOGUE. 
F. S. Frost. H. A. Lawrence. 



ELLIOT W. KEYES, 

APOTHECARY, 

Haskins' Block - - - Auburn Street, 
aue3urndal.e:, mass. 

FALL AND WINTER MILLINERY. 

MF?S. M. H. KIMBALL, 

Dealer in FRENCH FLOWERS, HATS, BONNETS and TRIMMINGS, 

MELROSE STREET, AUBURNDALE. 

V. A. PLUTA, 

D ealer in PROVISIONS, 

Cor. Auburn and Lexington Streets. 
"ALFRED BRUSH, 
APOTHECARY, 

Plummer's Block, Cor. of Auburn and Lexington Sts. 

auburndale. 



MRS. I_. 


COOK, 


PIDIilRlilEllSIIISIilMlilAlilKlilElilRlil 


Woodbine Street - 


- AUBURNDALE. 



GEORGE E. JOHNSON, 



■ DEALER IN ■ 



Hay, Grain and Feed, 

Lexington Street, 
AUBURNDALE, MASS. 

CHARLES G. TINKHAM, 

Livery, M mi Boarflii Site, 

Cor. of Lexington and Severn Sts., 
AUBTJKNDALE. 

JOHNSTON & Kk'YES, 

AUBURNDALE AND BOSTON EXPRESS. 



FARNUM &. COMPANY, 
PRODUCE COMMISSION MERCHANTS, 

Wholesale Dealers in Apples, Potatoes, Cranberries, Onions, Peas, 

Beans, Dried Apples, Oranges and Lemons, 

Nos. 108 and no Faneuil Hall Market - ■ BOSTON. 

Henry Farnum. W. W. Lawrence. 



BOSTON OFFICES, 

105 Arch Street, 
34 Court Square. 



AUBURNDALE OFFICE, 

Lexington Street, 
Near the Depot. 



H. EUGENE FLEMING, PH. G. 

PHARMACIST, 

FINE CONFECTIONERY a Specialty. 

Hear City Hall - - West Newton, Mas3, 




K 
IHipll 

llllli 






DECEMBER, 1887 




L/}$elt Le/ii/^s 



VOLUME XIII. -No. 3. 



CONTENTS. 



Editorials 43 

The Pictures in Paris 44 

"Two College Friends" 46 

A Fragment 48 

At Louise Hayden's Entombment 49 

In Memoriam 49 

Political Notes 50 

Scientific Notes 50 



Art Notes 50 

Major and Minor 51 

Temperance 51 

Exchange Notes 51 

Boiled, Roasted, or Raw, take your Choice . . -52 

Books Entered in Library 52 

Locals 53 

Personals 54 



Lasell Leaves. 



NOVELTIES 



IN 



MILLINERY 



RECEIVED DAILY FROM PARIS and LONDON. 



Ladies are invited to call and examine before purchasing 
elsewhere. Correct Styles. Popular prices. 



HENRY M. BURR & CO. 



490 Washington Street, 



BOSTON. 



OUR SPECIALTIES. 



AMERICAN WATCHES, 

DIHMONDS, 

Sterling Silver Ware, French Clocks and Bronzes, Fine 
Plated Ware, Jewelry and Fancy Goods. 

Designs and estimates for class rings, pins and badges furnished 
without charge. 



N. G. WOOD & SON, 

444 Washington Street, Boston. 

LAWRENCE, WILDE & CO. 

Manufacturers of First-Class 

FURNITURE 



AND 



INTERIOR DECORATIONS, 

Nos. 38 to 48 Cornhill - - Boston. 



A. Lawrbncs. 
Wm. H. Hull. 



Geo. B. Darrow. 
F. D. Wildk. 



ESTABLISHED 1830. 



ALFRED MUDGE & SON. 

PRINTERS. 

No. 24 FRANKLIN STREET, BOSTON, MASS. 

HAVE UNSURPASSED FACILITIES FOR 

B*X>K AND MISCELLANEOUS PRINTING, 

ELECTROTYPING AND STEREOTYPING, 

MERCANTILE AND COMMERCIAL PRINTING, 

FANCY BALL AND SOCIETY PRINTING. 



LAW WORK A SPECIALTY. 

A FULL LINE OF WEDDING STATIONERY ENGRAVED OR PRINTED. 

WEDDING OUTFITS executed In the finest manner at reasonable prices. 

Information regarding work in any department will at all times be promptly furnished, either 
personally or by correspondence. 

ALFRED MUDGE & SON, 24 FRANKLIN STREET. 



Lasell Leaves. 



4i 



C. D. COBB & BROS. 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 

GROCERIES 

Of the Very Finest Quality, 

And IMPORTERS of 

-8FANCY GARDEN TEASs^ 

Every .Article Warranted. 



Orders of $20 and. upwards Delivered at any 
point within IOO miles of Boston. 



FOR PARTICULARS, SEND FOR CATALOGUE TO 

C. D. Cobb & Bros. 

722 to 732 Washington Street, 
BOSTON - - - MASS. 



COBB, BATES & YERXA, 

IMPORTERS 



AND 



GROCERS. 



Twenty-dollar orders delivered free at any station 
within 50 miles of Boston, and fifty-dollar orders at 
any station in New England, at our regular retail prices . 



COBB, BATES k YERXA, 

680 to 692 Washington Street, 
3 Bowdoin Square, 

6 and. 8 Faneuil Hall Square. 

Also in 

CHELSEA, FALL EIVEE and TAUNTON. 



T. E. MOSELEY & CO. 



DEALERS IN 




, SHOES, RUBBERS, ETC. 



FOR LADIES, GENTLEMEN, BOYS, 
MISSES AND CHILDREN. 

A Large Assortment for 

YOUNG LHDIES. 



GYMNASIUM SHOES 

In Great Variety. 

ENGLISH LAST WALKING BOOTS, 

In CALF or GOAT, 
Are SENSIBLE, DURABLE, and REASONABLE in Price. 



T. E. MOSELEY & CO. 

469 Washington Street, 

BOSTON. 



GOOD MUSIC FOR ALL THE YEA R ROUND. 

Is found in such books as the following, which, when kept at hand, fur- 
nish unfailing entertainment for the player or singer. 

Song Classics for Low Voices. 

(one dollar.) 
About 50 Gems of Song by the best modern composers; Rubinstein, 
Lassen, Grieg, Gounod and others. A true treasure for Alto, Baritone 
and Bass Voices. 

SOJSTGr CLASSICS. 

(ONE DOLLAR.) 

For voices of average compass. All selected from the best sources. 
PIANO CLASSICS. 

(ONE DOLLAR.) 

An admirable collection of pieces in the best taste, by some of the best 
living composers. 

YOUNG PEOPLE'S CLASSICS. 

(ONE DOLLAR.) 

Easy pieces that will please all, young or old. 

The Good Old Songs We Used to Sing. 

($1.00 paper; $1.25 BDS.) 
A grand good new book, which will be received with open arms in 
every household. About 120 songs, with piano or organ accompaniment. 
Each one has been a distinguished success. Many are new to the pres- 
ent generation. Mailed for Retail Price. 

OLIVER DITSON & CO., BOSTON. 

GEO. E. ALLER 

- - - - Boston. 

LACES, YARNS, CORSETS, 



12 Winter Street 

TRIMINGS, BUTTONS, 



AND FANCY GOODS. 



youN 



G'S HOTEL. 



EUROPEAN PLAN. 

OPPOSITE THE HEAD OF STATE STREET, BOSTON. 

Ladies' entrance, Court Street, near Washington Street. 

J. R. WHIPPLE, PROPRIETOR. 



4 2 



Lasell Leaves. 



hastings, 
Qhe (Photographer. 



LADIES' FINE FOOTWEAR. 



Qvc otter lo irjc (STPGteluatirjq ar)d Llrjaep 
(fdexsses, etrjd also f© irjeip rjurrjeroas tpierjas, 
unusual advarjfaqes, Jsott) Top excellence o| 

PHOTOGRAPHIC WORK 

arjd reasonable prices. tfe/e quararjfee the 
rnosl e/lriisiic l^rocluciiorjs recede. 



No. 147 Tremont Street 



corner of West Street, 



BOSTON 



MASS. 



We have added for Fall and Winter, many new lines, including 
specialties of which we have exclusive control. 



GYMNASIUM SHOES, 
WEDDING AND PARTY 
BOOTS AND SLIPPERS. 



HENRY H. TUTTLE & CO. 

435 Washington Street, 
BOSTON. 




jEfTHE CLASSY 



5&I&* 



+^m 



PHOTOGRAPHER 






-*-•• 



For Lasell Seminary, 



'88* 



Studio, 22 Winter Street, 



BOSTON. 



LASELL LEAVES. 



DUX FEMINA FACTI. 



Volume XIIJ, LASELL SEMINARY, AUBUpDALE, MASS,, DECEMBER, 1BB7. Number 3, 



LASELL LEAVES. 



Published Monthly, during the School Year, 



Lasell Publishing Association 



LASELL SEMINARY FOR YOUNG WOMEN, 
Auburndale, Mass. 

Editor-in- Ch ief. 
ELIZABETH H. D. EDDY, '88. 

Local Editor. 
JOSEPHINE BOGART, '89. 



Political Editor. 
EULA LEE. 

Scientific Editor. 
SUE BROWN, '88. 

Musical Editor. 
CARRIE M. BROWN, '89. 



Art Editor. 
BERTHA A. SIMPSON, '8S. 

Exchange Editor. 
ANNE 0. BUSHNELL, '88. 

B 11 sin ess Manager. 
A. LINA JONES, '88. 



Subscription Agent, MAUDE E. MATHEWS, '89. 

TERMS, IN ADVANCE. 
One Copy, one year (including postage) . . $1.00 
Single Numbers . 15 cts. 



ADVERTISING RATES. 



SPACE. 


3 MONTHS. 


6 MONTHS. 


9 MONTHS. 


I-I2 column .... 


$1-50 


#2.50 


#3-5° 


1-6 " .... 


3.00 


5.00 


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4.OO 


6.5O 


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II.OO 


15.00 


3-4 " .... 


9.00 


I5.OO 


20.00 


1 " .... 


I2.00 


I9.OO 


25.00 



Press of Alfred Mudge &* Sou, 2j Franklin St,, Boston, 



Those of us who are old enough, will remember 
at the Centennial a striking little picture, which 
represented Santa Claus as perpetual youth. The 
idea is suggestive of the universal feeling about 
Christmas It is one of the few subjects which 
is, at the same time, always old and always new. 
It is as fresh and bright as its own holly. 

There are few, even of those whose lives three 
hundred and sixty-four days out of the three hun- 
dred and sixty-five are of the most cheerless, pro- 
saic type, who do not, at Christmas time, in part, 
catch the holiday spirit, and feel their hearts 
grow warmer with good-will toward all around them. 
The principle, " out of the abundance of the 
heart the mouth speaketh," has full sway at this 
time ; perhaps it rules some who are sorry the day 
after for what they term their rashly shown senti- 
ment. 

In Hat per 's Monthly, for December, Chas. 
Dudley Warner urges that the old time Christmas 
feeling should not run riot merely in charitable 
sentiment toward the poor and unfortunate, but 
that our sympathy and kindliness would not be 
wasted on the not-easy-to-be satisfied rich, whom 
we do not always have with us. His teaching is 
a wholesome corrective to the somewhat mawkish 
sentiment of Mr. Carleton's poem in the same 
number. 

After this declaration of our principles, we say, 
with as much heartiness as did the first man or 
woman (?) who ever uttered the words " A Merry 
Christmas and a Happy New- Year " to every one. 



" A difference of taste in jokes is a great 
strain on the affections." 

Truly, nothing is more forlorn, more dampen- 
ing to the spirits, than to tell a choice joke, 
and to have it meet with some such response as, 
"Well, I see into that, but isn't there any more 



44 



Lasell Leaves. 



to it? " We said that nothing was more forlorn, 
but we forgot the hopeless feeling of the person 
who has to listen to a long, pointless joke, all the 
time trying to work himself up to the smile that 
by and by is sure to be expected. This is the 
greatest of all taxes on the nervous system, and 
is always followed by utter exhaustion. A " cross 
section" of the listener's "mental mechanism" 
would prove an interesting study. 

Then the left-over laugh, that is always about 
thirty minutes behind standard time, and shows 
your entertaining friend, only too plainly, how 
closely you have been following the thread of his 
discourse. This is one of the most discouraging 
symptoms of boredom to a striving-to-be-funny 
young man. 

The person who chuckles all the time he is 
telling his story, thus causing a sympathetic smile 
on the faces of his hearers, though his subject- 
matter be as dry as sawdust, is not altogether an 
unpleasant sort of person to be with for a short 
time. Even if there is no point to his story, or if 
it be so microscopic as not to be visible, his sense 
of his own successful attempt at mirthfulness is 
so apparent that we feel a spirit of cheerfulness 
stealing over us in spite of ourselves. 

Then, there is the person who wakes in the night 
to laugh over some such witticism as Sydney Smith's 
" Dogmatism is only puppyism come to maturity " ; 
or who is suddenly convulsed at seeing the " point " 
to one of the not-easily-to-be-comprehended kind 
of jokes, hours after he has tried to show his appre- 
ciation of what he then failed to see. 

Time and space, those inexorable limitations to 
human thought, forbid us to dwell long on the 
"' chronic joker." Whether he is more of an 
infliction to himself or to the " friends of his 
friends," it would be hard to tell. Conceive the 
feelings of one who must either "set the table in 
a roar with merriment," or else be asked every 
fifth second if he feels ill. And he must, indeed, 
feel hilarious, compared to some of those who 
have to take part in the roaring. 

After all, this whole subject is summed up in 
the words of the old shepherd, in the " Noctes 
Ambrosiange": " Never try to be funny, Eric. 
I did once, and it went hard with me. I am now 
a melancholy wreck, and the people who listened 
to me, they — they all died long ago." 



LINES TO M. L. C, THE EDITOR-ELECT. 

{"Adaptation to eirct/mstances is the final test of education."') 

Editress ! with meek, brown eyes, 
In whose orbs no shadow lies, 
Pray you not my words despise. 

You, whose cares are just begun, 
But whose glories will be won 
With the setting of my sun ! 

Gazing with a timid glance 

On the marginal expanse 

Of the proof-sheets' first advance; 

Fresh and white that lengthy ream, 
Now, methinks, cloth to thee seem, 
Three months hence you '11 change your dream. 

Strange mistakes do oft combine 
To so change the strongest line, 
That words and sense refuse to " jine." 

Then pause not with indecision, 
But with boldness, not submission, 
Write intrepidly, " omission." 

If in making up your " dummy " 
There is space for something funny, 
— Bring out Egypt's oldest mummy. 

O thou child of " minus cares," 
There are troubles, there are snares, 
Which await thee unawares. 

Shed through all your trials drear 

Not a single briny tear, 

That will show your secret fear. 

" Lasell wit " within thy hand — 
. Printers, exchanges, can't withstand 
One touch of that magic wand. 



THE PICTURES IN PARIS. 



Did you ever notice how much better you could 
see pictures with your mouth open ? 

Sitting in the Louvre to-day, I let my eye rest 
a little by turning it on people, and I was sur- 
prised to see how many had already found out 
this strange truth in optics and were practising 
on it. Big mouths, little mouths, ugly mouths, 
pretty mouths, coarse mouths, fine mouths, all 
falling gently open as their owners fixed eyes on 
the pictures. Sometimes whole teeth, sometimes 
half teeth, sometimes no teeth behind the com- 



Lasell Leaves. 



45 



placently parted lips, oftener vacancy, or the sug- 
gestion of a roof of a mouth. 

Try it the next time you go to look at a church 
or some pictures. The other objects will look bet- 
ter if you don't. I was glad, pretty soon, to l< rest 
my eye" by turning it back upon the pictures. 

I suppose the privilege of copying the great 
pictures is one poor painters are very thankful for 
always; and fair ones, sometimes. But I begin 
to think it not an unmixed blessing for the world 
at large. When one sees a daub, such as a dear 
old lady was making to-day, of Murillo's " Con- 
ception," sent out to represent such a painting, 
one may fairly question whether the world at 
large will ever be the better for it. Such a dis- 
torted visage ought never to be allowed to be 
called a " reproduction " of the face of the Mary 
who is being admitted to companionship with the 
Deity. I am sure the spirits of the departed do 
not come again to earth, for if Murillo's spirit 
were anywhere within reach, it would gently but 
firmly lead that old lady by the ear to the door 
of Pavilion Denon. In all these galleries one 
sees such poor things offered, and I suppose they 
are scattered around the world, as copies of these 
beautiful pictures, and people who can't see the 
originals form their ideas of them by these dread- 
ful caricatures. I think they should be sup- 
pressed, and only good photographs, like Braun's, 
of Paris, allowed to go out, or copies that can 
pass muster. Some galleries require certain 
proofs of ability from copyists. This is in the 
right direction, but not half strict enough. The 
reproductions in color by the Royal Society of 
Berlin, the Arundel Society of London, and 
Goupil (to a small extent), of Paris, are, as a rule, 
faithfully done, and are far better than most 
copies by hand. I like either of the chief two 
" Immaculate Conceptions," by Murillo, at 
Madrid better than the one in the Louvre. In 
this the cherubs are pretty good; but the face of 
the Mary is not so finished, has not so thoroughly 
caught the expression which so delights one in 
the Madrid picture, and to a degree, to be sure, 
in this. Guido Reni has three beautiful pictures 
of St. Sebastian. I must say I think the Madrid 
one of these, too, the best. 

I have learned at least one thing which some 
one of you may some day thank me for telling 



now. Get photographs of places in the places 
themselves. I noticed that one, Laurent, of 
Madrid, hadj^samples of photographs in Seville, 
Granada, etc. So I thought I 'd save trouble and 
time by getting all jny views of Spain from him. 
Consequence is I am bringing home a very in- 
ferior quality of views of all these places, his 
plates being old and prints poor. But I could 
not go back after views ! 

By the way, I have not told you a word about 
Spain yet, and I am not going to begin now, only 
to say that travel there is by no means the diffi- 
cult or uncomfortable thing the books say it is. 
It is equally pleasant and comfortable with Italy ; 
as safe, as clean, and as satisfactory, though not 
as cheap. In two days' easy ride from Paris you 
are across the Pyrenees and Spain is before you. 
More travellers should go there. 

To come back to Paris pictures. The Luxem- 
bourg ought no more to be skipped, even in a 
hasty visit, than the Louvre. Some painting 
there is equal to any in the prouder gallery. 
Paris places its best at the service of all, free. 
Madrid charges a small sum, one half peseta, — 
a peseta is equal to a franc, — though one need 
pay only once a day, even if he go out and come 
in several times. The Salon is the thing in pic- 
lures now, and you will already have seen criti- 
cisms in the chief papers. Read them over 
carefully, and notice the names. Some of the 
best painting in France is there — and some very 
poor. I did not think that anything so poor 
could be admitted to the famous Paris Salon. But 
the comfort from the good painting is very great, 
only there is so much of it, one longs for more 
eyes and more time. It is a great treat. There 
are 5,318 things to see, — oils, water colors, draw- 
ings, engravings, statues in marble and bronze, 
architectural drawings, pastels, porcelains, etc. I 
used to think the Salon meant only paintings, but 
prizes are given in four departments : first, paint- 
ing ; second, sculpture ; third, architecture ; fourth, 
engraving. It is held in the Exposition Building 
of 1867. Sunday p.m., admission is free ; Sun- 
day a. m. and week day p. M, (except Friday), one 
franc ; week day a. m., two francs; Friday, all 
day, five francs. 

Hattie Foss, who was once at Lasell, has a 
picture here, this year, a portrait. A former 



46 



Lasell Leaves. 



painting teacher of Lasell, Miss Carpenter, has 
taken some of the prizes. 

Of the success of Miss Gardiner, '56, you will 
have already heard. 

I owe the Salon a grudge. Mrs. B. saw a 
splendid picture of a pumpkin, and it set her 
mouth to watering so for some pumpkin pie, that 
I shall have no peace till she can have a piece. 
(Respectfully dedicated to J. A. Hills ) Girls, 
/ wish you could see these paintings ! I think some 
of you rich girls would like to give each one good 
painting to Lasell for the benefit of generations 
yet unborn. How nice it would be in years after 
you are dead, for your friends to read on the 
frame of :i fine picture, " Gift of (say) Josie 
Wallace, of 1887," or of " Carrie Foster, 1886," or 
any other one of any year ! I would n't care what 
year. Then, pretty soon, we would build an art 
gallery for Lasell, and have them where they 'd do 
every one good forever. 

There are some very queer pictures ; one with a 
lot of blue-skinned girls, with indigo blue cloaks, 
in a light blue street, under a dark blue sky. 
Nothing like it ever met my eye in my travels. An 
immense one of Victor Hugo's tomb guarded by 
horsemen, who carry flaring torches, all natural, 
except a very Frenchy angel, of wholly earthly 
form, floating away in front What does it repre- 
sent? I can't see. That spoils a good picture. 
There is a Magdalen asleep in a " vaporous " 
style, better yet if entirely vaporous ! A picture 
of a beef's lights and liver makes one wonder for 
what possible reason it was put upon canvas. 
The aim of the painters of the nude seems to be 
not beautiful forms but distorted ones, in all sorts 
of possible, impossible, and uncomely positions. 
As a specimen of what they can do, I cannot 
criticise these painters But they have made 
some very ugly women and men. Never mind, 
one need not look at them ; there is plenty of 
beauty all about one. Robert Barrett Browning, 
Jr., has a picture on the walls, in questionable 
taste, but well done. There is a Last Supper, in 
which the disciples are all poor fishermen — much 
more like one's notion of them than most pictures. 

Another, of " The Bay of Death," where the 
dead of the Lady Franklin Expedition are' de- 
picted with dreadful truth. Two of Jules Breton's 
charming figure-pieces. Look closely at that l 



man's work, whenever you see it, also Julien 
Dupre's, and Aubert's, and Adan's, and Scher- 
rer's, and Bey's ; but there are many, and I did 
not start to speak of special pictures. Maybe I 
will another time. One thing is true, at every 
visit one sees good pictures, which he had not 
noticed before. 

That shows how foolish it is for any one to say, 
" These are the best," or " Those are all the good 
ones." If you want to learn to know good pic- 
tures, study one at a time, and study well. Yes- 
terday I was sitting enjoying that greatest of all 
works in stone, "The Venus of Milo," when a 
lady came into the sacred corner. She glanced at 
the statue, read the inscription, felt of the cloth 
curtain, took out her handkerchief from her reti- 
cule and very carefully wiped her nose, pulled 
down and adjusted her veil, glanced once more 
at the goddess, and moved contentedly, even 
majestically, as one conscious of duty fully done, 
to fresh fields. I came near pulling her back, and 
making her look ! 

John put the truth in a nutshell when I was 
showing him the Apollo Sauroktonos. " You 
see it is a man," I was saying, "With a woman's 
head on him," interrupted the boy. 

I could say a word or two more about pictures, 
but I spare you. C. C. B. 

"TWO COLLEGE FRIENDS." 

Doubtless, some who read the pathetic little 
" Story of Ida " wonder in just what consists its 
peculiar charm for Ruskin. Others, more pro- 
nounced in their opinions, insist that he must find 
it in his own ridiculous foot-notes. But however 
tastes may differ on that book, there can be but 
one opinion as to the merits of "Two College 
Friends," by Fred W. Loring. It is not a new 
work, nor does it in any sense deal with the com- 
plexities of modern life. It is a "Romance of the 
Rebellion," but differs from all other books of 
that kind in that its charm is a charm for all 
times. The story is a simple one, and simply 
told, but with a pathos that will bring tears to the 
eyes of a stoic. 

Two boys in " Old Harvard " become warm 
friends. In the midst of their happy, peaceful 
lives they are startled by the call of the President 
for aid to defend the country. With characteris- 



Lasell Leaves. 



47 



tic enthusiasm, the boys enlist, and we follow the 
thread of their lives through its varied phases until 
the last scene. In a night expedition Tom and 
Ned are taken prisoners, and Tom is attacked by 
a raging fever. They are placed under parole, 
and left on the banks of the river for the night. 
A way of escape offers itself, and Ned, driven 
almost mad by the incoherent ravings of his 
friend for assistance, is still further tempted to a 
breach of faith by the assurance of the guard that 
his escape would be unnoticed. His word of 
honor seems to weigh nothing in the balance with 
the agony, and it may be, the life of his friend. 
The temptation is too great to be resisted, and 
taking Tom he makes his way into the Federal 
lines, saves his friend, returns, delivers himself 
into the hands of Stonewall Jackson, and is sen- 
tenced to be shot. We quote from Loring : — 

" They led him out a little from the camp, where 
it seemed quiet. He saw them stand before him, 
heard one preliminary order given and caught the 
flash of rifle barrels in the early morning sunlight. 
Then there was a noise and disturbance in the 
camp beyond and a voice cried out, k It 'o an 
attack by the Federals.' 

"Before, he had been calm, self-possessed, half 
dead. Now he turned, involuntarily, and in one 
great, sweeping flood, his life came back. No 
more indifference, no more numbness — but in 
that one instant every drop of blood in his veins 
seemed charged with electric power and the morn- 
ing air was like nectar. He stood there strong 
like a man. Then there was one report, and he 
fell dead — dead in the dust of the Virginia soil." 

The strong character of the book is Ned. He 
is one of those rare people whom we have all seen 
and who are all the grander for their rareness. 
Always extremely happy or miserable, enthusias- 
tic, animated, alive to everything, or gloomy and 
full of scorn; but, underlying all, a deep, strong 
character with principles as firmly fixed as the 
everlasting hills. He is what Loring calls not 
dissatisfied, but unsatisfied. He is one whose 
life must be spent in giving, not in receiving, and 
whose love is almost idolatry. He is withal dis- 
criminating, unprejudiced, and just ; giving honor 
where honor is due. Almost with his last breath 
he writes of Stonewall Jackson, the man who pro- 
nounced his death sentence, the enemy of the cause 



for which he fought, " Stonewall Jackson is a 
hero." There is, perhaps, in his nature a little 
manly conceit, or better still, self-consciousness, 
visible when he says of a certain young lady, 
"How she must have hated me — perhaps." 

Tom is more human, and much weaker. He 
lacks that power of endurance which is one of 
Ned's strong points. Liking the world in general, 
he is happily conscious that the world in general 
reciprocates the affection ; but his love for others 
is so divided up and parcelled out among many 
different people, that he can feel for no one the 
strong affection which rules Ned. He is one of 
those people who rest securely on flowery beds of 
ease, receiving, perhaps not ungratefully but 
unconsciously, the efforts of others to make their 
path in life easy, and having a disposition so 
loving and lovable that others take pleasure in 
serving them. With the usual perversity of nature, 
these two friends are exactly opposite, reminding 
one of a sunbeam and a volcano. 

There is a lack of the woman element in the 
book, but we are forced to confess that it is 
without serious detriment. A prophecy by a 
man, characteristically named Moody, to the 
effect that Ned was to die a dishonorable death 
for a dishonorable action, might better have 
been omitted. We are too wise in this day to 
believe in the fallacy, and it only serves to pre- 
pare us for the end. 

The book is assuredly artistic. In its way it is 
perfect. It may not deserve to rank among 
great works, but it is certainly wholesome and 
profitable reading, especially at a clay when 
"some aspects of pessimism," " indifferentism," 
and kindred topics are too much with us. It 
possesses the fine characteristic of being tragic, 
but natural, and without any of the usual blood 
and thunder accompanying tragedies. 

If the object of the book is to inspire in these 
cold hearts of ours a more generous appreciation 
of the defenders of our country, it has not been 
written in vain. There are few who will close it 
without feeling such veneration for the brave 
boys, who, fighting for a principle, conquered, 
and died, that from the depths of our hearts we 
shall " say with Loring, '-Woe to our country, 
should the great debt owed to these heroes be 
ever forgotten." Lasei.lia. 



4 8 



Las ell Leaves. 



A FRAGMENT. 

" That is the third unexplained smile you have 
given within this last half-hour. If you do not 
tell its meaning directly, I feel convinced that 
' concealment, like a worm in the bud, will feed 
on my damask cheek.' Perhaps those are n't the 
exact words, but, anyway, 1 am confident as to 
the spirit. I suppose, though, you are such an 
admirer of 'abnormal types,' that nothing but one 
of Dickens's spontaneous-combustion cases would 
move you." 

"There is no need for so much sarcasm on 
your part. That smile was simply a ' left-over 
expression.' I was thinking how different people 
are, and how sublimely ridiculous I should appear, 
standing with clasped hands and looking at the 
first snowfall. Don't be so literal as to tell me 
that we haven't had any snow yet this season. 
That 's the way I should have looked last winter, 
and I 'm arguing on the principle that women are 
only girls grown tall. That's all there is to my 
thought ; simply a ' mental act of comparison ' 

between myself and . But if my words do 

not call up the individual to your mind, they 
haven't force enough to merit explanation." 

The speakers were two girls in a certain semi- 
nary in N. As to their appearance, we act on 
their own suggestion, and let the "inner" ex- 
plain the "outer." Suffice it to say, that although 
both had read Miss Phelps's book on boarding- 
school life, neither of them was perched in grace- 
ful unconsciousness on the " washstand," nor 
had either the "intense, soulful gaze of a young 
Psyche." The Delsarte system under which they 
were trained did not teach the attitude, nor did 
the Faculty favor that particular kind of a " gaze.' 
Still, the girls, between them, could give very 
creditable impersonations of " Amy " and "Wil- 
lis Campbell," in Mr. Howells\ " Garroters," and 
they had been known to take leading parts in 
" Bluebeard's Wives" and "Lord Ullin's Daugh- 
ter." One word more : though the time was rec- 
reation hour, and Christmas only a few weeks 
off, neither of them was making either slippers, or 
necktie cases marked " Knot the only tie that 
binds us." Both had brothers, and knew just 
how serviceable those gifts really are. No ! the 
work on which they were actually engaged at that 



moment was mending. Not mending broken sem- 
inary rules, or broken resolutions, — in common 
with the rest of humanity, they left that delightful 
task until New-Year's Day, — but mending their 
own clothes. They had exhausted the time-hon- 
ored joke, that " the wear and tear of clothing 
washed at boarding school varies directly as the 
square of the distance from the home laundry," 
and all the other obvious suggestions of the occa- 
sion. Silence had ruled for the space of five 
minutes, and then had followed the conversation 
with which our sketch opens, and with which it 
will now continue. 

" What led you to compare yourself with other 
girls, anyway ? " 

" Oh, you know I shall be out of school soon, 
and naturally, I am looking ahead a little, won- 
dering what I '11 do, and what and where I '11 be. 
Now, some people are fixed quantities, and one 
can fancy exactly what they will say and do at 
any given moment. Others are chaotic, and one 
never knows whether they will bring down a del- 
uge on other people, or be in one of their own 
causing. I used to think it would be a fine thing 
to have a 'mental Niagara,' tremendous water 
power, and beautiful moonlit scenery all at one's 
personal disposal ; but I am beginning to change 
my views." 

" So am I ; especially after a year of such rest- 
lessness — trying all the while to force myself into 
something different from what I naturally am — that 
I am likely to be the inventor of perpetual motion 
from very force of my own mental friction. I wish 
that somebody, who is neither a crank nor a trans., 
cendentalist, would give me a fair representation 
of the average American voung woman, as she 
really is, and not as somebody thinks she is, or 
thinks she ought to be. It has never been done yet, 
and I think it would be a great gain for all of us." 

"It would almost seem, though, as if it must 
be a hopeless experiment, for it has been tried so 
many times, and has always been such a miserable 
failure. I believe that the typical young woman 
would not be popular in print. She would n't be 
half so funny to ' the multitude ' as, for instance, 
' Nan,' who is simply and purely the product of 
the brain (?) of some college boy, who is ignorant 
of one of the first principles of political economy, 
that the demand always determines the supply. 



Lasell Leaves. 



49 



He is truthful of course, and pictures exactly what 
he sees. The worse for his sight ! " 

" f have an idea ! Let us advertise for a story 
for our school paper, which shall typify this Amer- 
ican young woman ; and in order to protect our- 
selves from the wit that does not cheer but does 
inebriate, let us make certain conditions for the 
competition." 

" First of all, I 'd like to stipulate that the her- 
oine be not represented as a regal lily nodding 
from a cliff ; and that she do not have that ' long, 
slender shape, and the clear-cut, pale features 
which look so well against a carmine background.' 
Most of us cannot do the 'regal lily act,' and 
' carmine ' is n't a good color for everyday wear 
and tear." 

" My first suggestion would be, that she do not 
have that most unpsychological of all consciences 
— a combination of the New England and the 
Howells types. Oh, yes! and that, unlike, Mr. 
James's feminine characters, she have weight, 
physically and mentally ; that is, neither as heavy 
as lead nor as light as a feather." 

" And that she do not be pictured when off on 
her summer vacation, nor in some passing moment 
of imbecility; but that she be represented as her- 
self, just as she is fourteen out of fifteen hours in 
each three hundred out of the three hundred and 
sixty-five days in a year." 

" One thing more, this competition shall be open 
to a!', except to those men who have not yet lived 
long enough to know that ' we see in the world 
chiefly that for which we look ; we hear in the 
world chiefly that for which we listen.'" 

Composita, '89. 



AT LOUISE HAYDEN'S ENTOMBMENT. 

I did not think my first visit to these valued 
friends would be to be present at the burial of 
one of that splendid family of children. I had 
often wished to see them at home, but I had not 
anticipated this call. 

In the spacious yard, with plenty of windows 
for sunlight, and nothing to hinder it from get- 
ting to them, notwithstanding the magnificent 
elms in the yard and before it, stands the pleas- 
ant house which has been Lou's borne since she 



was two years old. She was the baby when the 
family moved hither from Wisconsin. 

The Episcopal service was read over the white, 
flower-covered casket by her rector, who said, 
"In no home in my parish do I more feel that 
the peace of God rests than in this." Loving 
hearts said Amen to all the prayers ; loving hands 
bore to her long resting-place on the near hillside 
what was mortal, while we almost heard the whis- 
pers of the immortal voice saying, " It is well with 
my soul," and almost could see tne immortal 
hand beckoning us on. Dear Lou ! her race early 
run, but well run. She leaves among us a record 
of a gentle, loving life. Who were not her 
friends ? 

Dear parents, dear Jessie, dear brothers and 
sisters all, Lasell misses her and weeps with you, 
hopes with you, believes with you. C. C. B. 



Died in Utica, Nov. 26th, Mary Starks Brownell. 

Such are the few words which bring grief to us, 
while they announce her entrance to a home in 
glory. The voice we once so loved to hear is 
hushed to us, while she joins in the song of glory 
on the other side. 

The representatives of Lasell are gathering fast 
in that happy land where there is no sorrow, 
where Christ himself has gone to prepare a place 
for those who love Him. 

When near the end, she was asked if she would 
see the clergyman, she replied : " I have no prep- 
aration to make, and will save the little strength 
I have for my family. She talked with her hus- 
band and dear little Edith, making arrangements 
as if for a little absence, then bade them good by, 
and was ushered into glory, with a smile on her 
face that made others almost long to o-o. Like 
Carrie and Lou, she had a brief illness, and "she 
was not, for God took her." 

Of this event the Utica Observer of Nov. 26 
speaks as follows : — 

"At an early hour this morning, death's 
dart lodged in a gentle breast, and a beloved 
spirit passed out forever. It had been poised for 
months, its coming was foreseen, but it sped 
quickly at last. Mrs. Mary Starks Brownell, the 



So 



Lasell Leaves. 



wife of John J. Browneil, of the house of Tucker, 
Calder & Co., came to Utica with her husband 
less than five years ago. She came from one of 
the honored homes of Troy, to be welcomed in 
like homes in Utica, for her refinement, her gen- 
tleness, and her worth. If society saw her not so 
so much as it would, it was still admiring and 
kindly in its regard, for it saw a young wife and 
mother happy in new and tender cares, and the 
better ornament and worthier member of her cir- 
cle for the qualities manifest and maturing. Mrs. 
Browneil was a member of the First Presbyterian 
Church. Her father and mother, Mr. and Mrs. 
Ralph J. Starks, of Troy, two brothers and a sis- 
ter survive. To the bereaved husband is left a 
daughter about two years old, to renew for long 
years, let us trust, in her smiles and graces the 
memory of the beloved departed. Mrs. Brownell's 
death resulted from consumption originating in a 
cold contracted but a few months ago," 



POLITICAL NOTES. 

On the evening of Nov. 24, M. Grevy handed 
in his resignation of the presidency of the French 
Republic. The text of M. Grevy's message is to 
the effect that he finds it impossible to continue 
to govern the country. M. Sadi Carnot has been 
elected his successor. 

A verdict has been rendered in New York 
against Gasman Blanco, President of Venezuela, 
for $2,194,500 and costs. 

Lord Lyons, late British Minister at Paris, now 
in his severity-first year, has been stricken with pa- 
ralysis, and his death is looked for in the near 
future. He has been removed to London from 
Paris. 



SCIENTIFIC NOTES. 

Seventeen steel canoes form part of the equip- 
ment of the Nicaragua Canal Company's survey- 
ing parties, which will sail from New York City 
in a few days. The canoes are built of galvanized 
steel, one twentieth of an inch thick, and are in- 
tended for the transportation of the different par- 
ties to their stations along the route of the canal, 
as well as to facilitate the making of the surveys. 
The largest electric light in the world is the 
ghthouse at Sydney, Australia. It has the power 



of 180,000 candles, and can be seen at sea fifty 
miles distant. America's largest light, 24,000 
candle power, is at San Jose, Cal. 

As to Mr. Loisette's system of memory training, 
about which in our last issue we quoted a para- 
graph which has been going the rounds of the 
press, there seem to be two opinions. A good 
many who have taken it, indorse it heartily, and 
say it will do all it professes, while some de- 
clare gently, that it is a farce. The truth' proba- 
bly is, that by devoting much time daily, under 
competent direction, either of Mr. Loisette him- 
self or of some other enthusiast, great strength of 
memory would result. But for the average pupil 
who has not much time to spare, and who must 
depend on her own will to make her do the 
"exercises," the result may be considered an 
"uncertain quantity." 



ART NOTES. 

The Portfolio, for November, for its frontis- 
piece has a fine, soft etching, by Rajan, of "A 
Flower Girl," by Murillo. The only objection to 
it is, that it presents the effect of an engraving, 
rather than an etching. The other large plates 
are an Elizabethan gallant, " Knowest Thou this 
Water-fly ? " by Pettie, etched by G. H. Rhead ; 
and Constable's "The Hay- Wain," etched by C. 
P. Brandard. 

Mr. Gullick, a London artist and art-writer, 
has opened, in Fifth Avenue, a gallery of deco- 
rative painting on mirrors and window glass by 
himself and his assistants. This art is a modern 
adaptation of an old Italian form of decoration, 
and as practised by Mr. Gullick, has met with 
appreciation in London art circles. The ex- 
amples shown are chiefly of floral designs, in 
which the natural forms and colors are preserved. 
They are very effective and decorative, besides 
being technically well executed. 

Nine cartoons in charcoal, designed by Signor 
C. Maccari, for frescos in the Palace of Justice, 
in Rome, are on exhibition at the Schaus gallery. 
Five are historical subjects. The largest of these 
represent "The Return of Regulus to Carthage," 
" Appius Claudius Crassus entering the Senate to 
oppose Peace with Pyrrhus," and "Cicero de- 



Lasell Leaves. 



5i 



claiming against Catiline." One of the smaller 
ones represents the Goths entering Rome ; another 
shows Curius Dentatus rejecting the gifts of the 
Samnite embassy. The other cartoons depict 
" Literature and Art," " Agriculture and Trade," 
and " Science and War." 

Mr. St. Gauden's "Puritan " was unveiled on 
Thanksgiving, at Springfield, Mass. A semi- 
circular hedge behind it rises as high as the 
shoulders of die statue, and forms a pedestal. A 
bench is placed in front, and at the end of the 
grass-plot is a fountain with a circular basin. 



MAJOR AND MINOR. 
Queen Victoria wrote on Patti's autograph 
fan the following : " If King Lear is light in say- 
ing that a sweet voice is a precious thing in a 
woman, you are the richest of women." 

The five hundredth performance of Gounod's 
" Faust " was a notable event at the Grand Opera, 
Paris, Nov. 4, when the composer conducted and 
received an ovation. Mme. Carvalho, the original 
Marguerite, was present ; also Queen Isabella, 
of Spain, Prince de Sagon, and Prince de 
Bourbon. 

Fursch Madi is one of the greatest favorites 
who ever appeared before the Boston public. 

Jenny Lind was married in Boston. 

Miss Clara Louise Kellogg was married in 
the early part of this month, at Elkhart, Indiana, 
to Mr. Carl Strakosch, her manager. The event 
did not surprise any one, as the announcement of 
their engagement was published last season. 



TEMPERANCE. 

" For God and Home and Native Land." 

When Gladstone was Prime Minister of the 
United Kingdom, a deputation of brewers waited 
on him to remind him of the loss the revenue would 
sustain by any further restrictions on the liquor 
traffic. His reply was : " Gentlemen, you need 
not give yourselves any trouble about the revenue. 
The question of revenue must never stand in the 
way of needed reforms. Besides, with a sober 
population, not wasting their earnings, I will know 
where to get my revenue." 



A village was recently incorporated in North- 
ern Wisconsin by the name of Glen wood. In the 
charter a proviso is made for the insertion in all 
deeds of sale, that the sale of any kind of ardent 
spirits on any lot in the village shall forfeit the 
property to the original owner. 

Some Southern towns that have adopted prohi- 
bition report their trade in women's and chil- 
dren's clothing to have increased five hundred per 
cent since the saloons were driven out. 

It is stated that Chicago alone paid out last 
year over saloon counters for strong drink $35,- 
000,000. The whole United States gave for mis- 
sions, home and foreign, only $6,000,000. 



EXCHANGE NOTES. 



In the Colby Echo, "The Genius of Haw- 
thorne," a prize article, is quite interesting. We 
quote the last sentence : — 

" And if, from the absence of a glittering sur- 
face, his works do not so much attract the popular 
throng, if his fame is not likely to be that of the 
well-thumbed and dog-eared page, he certainly is 
now, and will be still more hereafter, regarded by 
competent critics as one of the most refined, 
tender, powerful, and highly imaginative writers in 
the English language." 



A MEMORY. 

Prone at her feet in bliss he lies, 
His cares forgot beneath her eyes; 
Spread on her knee, of crimson bright 
A silken flag, with strands of white, 
With fingers deft she decorates — 
One side to Harvard dedicates, 
To " 90," one. 

And now from her and class estranged, 
He wonders if it could be changed 
To "91." 



Harvard Advocate 



A WARNING. 

Once 1 was a happy college man, 
No cares oppressed my mind; 

1 ran up bills as I went along, 
And left them far behind. 



52 



Lasell Leaves. 



My livery bills I quite forgot, 

My tailors' bills as well; 
When asked how much I owed my chum, 

I never quite could tell. 

Alas ! alas ! now all is changed. 

Although I fume and fret, 
Those wretched bills I once ran up, 

I never can forget. 

They 're with me while the daylight lasts, 

They haunt me in my sleep, 
Their horrid presence fills my mind, 

Though rapt in slumbers deep. 

I 'm now a wretched college man, 

Thus with my cares beset, 
No longer trifles slip my mind, 

I 've taken of Loisette. 

Williams Weekly. 



Nothing but leaves — the day before vacation. 

Never step upon a train while it is in motion 
— it is liable to tear. 

The bald man says his head is like paradise — 
there is no parting there. 

The eve of a nation's birth — Mrs. Adam. 

The Chinese question — " How muchee pay?" 

A shocking accident — struck by lightning. 

The fishery question — " How many did you 
catch?"— Yale Coar ant. 



BOILED, ROASTED, OR RAW, TAKE YOUR CHOICE. 

It is reported that Harvard is making offers for 
the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, for 
the purpose of making it her own scientific 
school. 

Yale has graduated 195 Smiths since 1709. 

It is said that there are eighteen thousand 
female students in the colleges of the United 
States. 

Columbia possesses one of the two extant 
copies of the " first folio " of Shakespeare. The 
value is three thousand dollars. 

A female college, modelled after Wellesley 
and Vassar, is to be established at Denver, Col., 
in the near future. 



Cornell library receives on an average ten 
books a day. 

A composite photograph of the class of '87, 
Amherst, is said to be an exact likeness of a 
picture of Guiteau taken the day before his death. 

It is reported that Vassar students are about 
to adopt the Oxford cap and gown. 

It is evident that the Lasell Leaves is the 
product of the feminine mind. 



BOOKS ENTERED IN LIBRARY OF LASELL SEMINARY 
IN NOVEMBER, 1887. 

Browning, Robert. Poetical Works. 6 

vols. . . . . . . . 821. 2 b 

Cabot, James Elliot. Memoirs of R. W. 

Emerson. 2 vols. .... 920. 26 a 

Dumas, Alexander. Le Comte de Monte- 
Cristo. 6 vols. ..... 

Duruy, Victor. History of Rome and the 
Roman People. 8 vols. 

Giles, Henry. Human Life in Shake- 
speare ...... 

Hanson, Geo. P. The Legend of Ham- 
let - 

Jackson, Helen Hunt (H. H.). A Century 
of Dishonor ..... 

Jackson, Helen Hunt (H. H). Ramona, 823.73 

Lincoln, Mrs. D. A. Boston School 
Kitchen Text-Book .... 

Love, Samuel G. Industrial Education . 

Prescott, William H. Conquest of Mex- 
ico. 3 vols. ..... 

Schaff, Phillip. History of the Christian 
Church. 4 vols. .... 

Wallace, Lew. Ben-Hur 

Whitney, William Dwight. Language, 
and the Study of Language . . . 408 



943- 1 
973- 9 
822.60 
822.61 
970. 1 



641. 5 
607. 1 

978. 1 

270. 2 
823.72 



Prof. Alexander Hogg, M. A., Superintend- 
ent of Public Schools in Fort Worth, Texas, and 
father of two of the present pupils of Lasell, has 
sent to Prof. Bragdon a bound copy of an address 
upon the " Railroad as an Element in Education," 
delivered before the International Congress of 
Educators, at the World's Exposition in New 
Orleans. Mr. Bragdon has placed the little book in 
the reading-room, that all may have the benefit of it. 



Lasell Leaves. 



53 



LOCALS. 

" Water, water everywhere, nor any drop to 
drink." 

Flashes of wit (?) left over from Thanksgiving : 
Roast goose or roast turkey ? {To be spoken with 
a strong Hibernian accent.) Also sardines. That 's 
all! 

We who remained here during Thanksgiving 
were not so badly off as some who deemed them- 
selves more fortunate supposed. The weather 
was not all that could be desired, but this did 
not dampen our ardor. We went into Boston 
shopping, and heard Mrs. Langtry, (soft ; do not 
wake me ; let me dream again ;) with a cheerful- 
ness which was truly surprising. The arrange- 
ments for dinner were felicitous in every respect, 
and even the most fastidious could not have 
found fault with the repast ; with the exception 
of one "mistake in the course," everything passed 
off happily. A glance at the menu given below 
will, perhaps, satisfy any who are disposed to be 

sceptical. 

MENU. 

Oysters on Half Shell. 



Soup. 
Bisque. 



Fish. 

Cusk a la Creme. 

Radishes. Dressed Lettuce. 



Roast. 



Goose, Apple Sauce. 



Turkey, Cranberry Sauce. 
Celery. 

Game. 

Quail on Toast. Roast Venison. 

Duchess Potatoes, Currant Jelly. 



Cold Dishes. 
Shrimp Salad. Boned Chicken, Jelly. 



Vegetables. 

Cream Cauliflower. Green Peas. 

Onions. Stewed Tomatoes. 

Mashed Potatoes. Baked Sweet Potatoes. 



Pastry. 

Mince Pie. Pumpkin Pie. 

Baked Plum Pudding. Fancy Cakes. 



Dessert. 

Vanilla Ice Cream, Fruit, Nuts, Raisins. 

Cheese, Coffee. 



The dining-room was tastefully decorated with 
ferns and flowers, the tables being arranged in 
the form of a square. Miss Daisy Lloyd was very 
pleasing as toast-mistress. The following toasts 
were given : " The Day we Celebrate," Miss 
Gilbert; "Lasell," Prof. Bragdon ; "The Har- 
vard Annex," Miss Stafford, '86 ; "The Toast as 
an Institution," Miss Tappen, of Gannett Insti- 
tute. After dinner, all took themselves to the 
gymnasium, where dancing and " blind man's 
buff " were indulged in by some of the more youth- 
ful (?) among us. 

Saturday evening, an informal reception was held 
in the gymnasium. Refreshments were served dur- 
ing the evening, and some very enjoyable music 
rendered by a quartette of gentlemen. 

By the way, some of us during vacation had a 
good opportunity to sample Boston mud. Of all 
mud, it is the worst. We firmly believe that the 
far-famed clay of New Jersey does not surpass in 
"sticktuitiveness " the mud of Boston. 

Mud, mud, the terrible mud, 
Covering the streets in a city called " Hub "; 
Over the curbstones, over the feet, 
Spattering the clothes of the people we meet; 
As rushing and crowding, they hurry along, 
Terrible mud, it does them much wrong I 



Eve, Dec. 7. 
■ Faculty and 



young 



Scene — Dining-room. 

Dramatis Persons ■ 
women of Lasell. 

Conversation — Minus quantity. 

The stillness is occasionally broken by a titter 
from some non-self-governed girl. 

At the end of the meal, exit girls, amid the 
applause of an admiring Faculty. 

There was once a gay Turkish Pasha, 
Who winked — what on earth could be rasha? — 
At the Sultan's best wife, and so lost his life ; 
The moral is — don't be a masha. ' From Life. 

The local editor has come to the conclusion 
that she fully agrees with the man who said, 
" There is nothing new under the sun." 

Wanted, an interpreter to explain the obtuse 
jokes of one of the members of our Faculty. 

On the evening of the 30th a very pleasant and 
instructive lecture on Mexico was given by Hon. 
Clarence Pullen, Ex-Surveyor General. The lec- 
ture was illustrated by stereopticon *' ; ews, which 



54 



Lasell Leaves. 



were no small aid in helping us to understand 
how Mexico looks to-day. 

Lasell, with her usual go-ahead spirit, has in- 
stituted another new departure. This time, it is 
in the way of lectures. Dec. i, Miss Marion 
Talbot, of Boston, gave the first of a course of 
eight lectures on "Sanitation." At different 
times the girls are to be taken around the build- 
ing and the mysteries of plumbing and drainage 
thoroughly explained. Next year, Mr. Bragdon 
contemplates forming a private class in sanitation. 

On Dec. 7, the life and times of Thomas a 
Becket, the noble supporter of the great cause of 
papal supremacy during the twelfth century, were 
entertainingly and fluently treated by Dr. B. K. 
Pierce, editor of Zioifs Herald. The lecturer 
characterized a Becket as the central figure of the 
reign of Henry II., a soldier, courtier, and monk 
of unchanging purpose, indomitable courage, and 
unlimited ambition. 

" Oh, for the touch of a vanquished hand." 

Dec. 10 was quite a memorable day in the an- 
nals of Lasell Seminary, and doubtless the events 
which took place furnished material for innumera- 
ble Sunday letters. Instead of the usual "five- 
o'-clock tea," we were very pleasantly surprised by 
a game dinner. At 5.30 we gathered around 
the hospitable board, and, it is hardly necessary 
to say, did ample justice to the viands. The 
dinner consisted of five courses, nearly every 
kind of game being represented. One distin- 
guished guest was present, a lordly turkey who 
had braved the perils of Thanksgiving, and come 
through safely. In the evening a number of the 
girls assisted in whiling away the hours by giving 
" The Garroters." The characters were taken as 
follows : — 

Mr. Roberts Miss Lloyd. 

Mr. Willis Campbell Miss Helen White. 

Mr. Bemis, Sr Miss Bogart. 

Dr. Lawton Miss Stafford. 

Mr Bemis, Jr Miss Hogg. 

Mrs. Roberts Miss Gilbert. 

Mrs. Crashaw (Aunt Mary) Miss Barbour. 

Mrs Bemis, J r Miss Havens. 

Bella, the Maid Miss Peabody. 

Stage Manager Miss Jo?tes. 



An orchestra, consisting of Misses Couts, Gib- 
bons, Crosby, Sue Brown, McBrier, and Alma 
Hall, added much to the enjoyment of the evening. 

But all things must come to an end, and warned 
by the inevitable bell, we sought our downy (?) 
couches to dream sweetly of . 

A vote of thanks is due Mr. Sheppard for his 
kindness and valuable assistance. 

The immortal "Johnny" continues to sit upon 
a rail, and refuses to come off his perch of popu- 
larity in the vocabulary of the youthful maiden. 



PERSONALS. 

Mrs. Evelyn Darling Jefferds, who was 
here in 1867, visited the "old home" Dec. 7. 
She has not lost any of her former love for Lasell, 
as her eldest daughter enters in January, and she 
has three more to be educated. 

Anna Baker, here from Warsaw, but now of 
Buffalo, purposes matrimony this winter with a 
gentleman of New York, whose name she did not 
trust us with. They will go abroad for an indefi- 
nite time. She says he is a splendid man ; we 
hope so, for no other deserves Anna. The 
Leaves sends its blessing. 

A pleasant letter, dated Ionia, Michigan, from 
Mrs. Mary Carter Stoddard, who was a Lasell 
girl in 1877, tells us she has been "so busy'' 
attending to household duties. She has one 
child, now eight years old, and is very proud of 
him. 

Mrs. Frank A. Marvin, nee Leora Haley, and 
Miss Helen Johnson, made Lasell a little visit 
Nov. 31. 

We hear that Estella S. Gould, of 1881, is now 
giving lessons in dancing to Ida Mack Mansfield 
and her husband. 

Mrs. Hattie Robbins Reeve's address is 239 
Cumberland Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Emma Civill, '87, is at 120 State Street, 
Albany, for the winter, studying music for part 
of her work. 

Mrs. George Edward Haskell (Blanche 
Jones) looks very charming in her new position 
of mother. Margaret is now five months old, and 
a winsome lassie. 



Lasell Leaves. 



55 



Sadie Perkins, of Hyde Park, is at home, 
very much interested in her music. 

Hattie Hamner is living with her mother for 

the winter at Hotel , Hartford. She plans 

to be Mrs. Mark Robbins before very long, and 
says he is "very nice." 

Jennie Griswold, of European party of '82, 
has two fine children and a nice home in East 
Hartford, and seems to be prospering. It was a 
pleasure to see her and Hattie the other day. 
They report a dear little "stranger" of three or 
four months in Stella Smith Strong's home in New 
Haven. 

Alice Howlett looks stronger and comelier 
than when here. She is in her fourth year of 
teaching, which proves her acceptable. 

At Yonkers, on the Hudson, Phila Nichols 
Millbank makes glad the hearts of Mr. and Mrs. 
I. Millbank (Virginia Johnson) . since Nov. 17. 

Maggie Sanders Lincoln, here in '76, is now 
living in Hartford, Conn. 

Prof. William McDonald, Wheatie's brother, 
was married, Nov. 24, to Miss Hattie Haskell, of 
Lawrence, Kansas. 

Married, at Gardiner, Maine, Nov. 23, Miss 
Harriet Gray to Mr. Benjamin B. Clay. Miss 
Gray left Lasell in '81. 

Married, at Auburndale, Dec 1, 1887, Har- 
ley E. Folsom and Jennie L. Darling. At home 
after Jan. 10, 1887, Lyndonville, Vt. 

Tihbie Hosford, of Clinton, Iowa, is paying 
a round of visits among her Eastern friends 
Lizzie Canterbury, of East Weymouth, Lizzie 
Whipple, of Boston, Blanche Henlin, of New 
York, and Mrs. Lizzie Hoag-Waite, of Lockport, 
N. Y., will each have been favored with a visit 
before she returns home. 

Nellie Hugus came on from California to West 
Point last summer. Her engagement to an Eng- 
lish gentleman was announced a year ago. 

Jessie Reece is not in Europe as per November 
Leaves. On her return, after six months, she 
dutifully subscribed for the Leaves, and went to 
work studying art and music at home. She boasts 
of excellent health. Saw Georgia Myers on the 



return trip, and talked "•old Lasell" with her on 
many a tossing day. One of the guests of 
Thanksgiving Day was Louise Hawley Sanders, 
here eleven years ago from Aurora, 111., since 
living in Southbridge, Mass.. as James Sanders's 
wife. She brought her husband and eight-year- 
old daughter, Mamie, who declined to be known 
as "Baby S." We expect to see all again at 
Lasell. Thanks for the visit. 

In accordance with a recent bequest of its 
founder, the Gammon School of Theology at At- 
lanta, Ga., of which our Mary Haven is co- 
president, being the wife of its valued president, 
W. V. Thirkield, has been separated from Clark 
University, and will henceforth stand on its own 
feet. A good plan. 

The engagement is announced of Miss Anna 
Baker, of Buffalo, and Mr. Jebb, of New York. 

The class of 1885 is proud of Grace Durfee, 
who suceeeds so well in her teaching at Carlton 
College, Northfield, Minn. 

Bertha Morrison, of Chicago, has been visit- 
ing Jennie Kiser in Keokuk, la., recently. 

Rev. H. E. Frohock, of Bar Harbor, and of 
the East Maine Conference, his wife and her sis- 
ter, Mrs. Calderwood, from Milton, have made a 
short visit at Lasell, entering the classes and in- 
specting all parts of the building with interest. 

Dr. Geo. O. Rogers, author of a book upon 
Ceramics, who has lent ninety pieces of Chinese 
pottery, often of great value, to the Art Museum 
of Boston, kindly offered to meet Mr. Bragdon 
and a party of the pupils of Lasell one afternoon 
at the Art Museum. He explained the vases and 
jars to them, and gave them much valuable infor- 
mation which he himself had gathered in years of 
study in China. The party remember his kind- 
ness with much gratitude. 

By oversight in proof-reading in November 
number, our " devil " made us say " Horsford " 
for Hosford, p. 34; "Carrie Waite " for Con- 
stance Waite ; "Eva Wise" for Eva Wires; 
"Grace Fritley " for Grace Fribley ; and " Charles 
Ruse" as Hattie Robbins's husband, when she 
married Charles Reeve, We are sorry. 



56 



Lasell Leaves. 



FRENCH 

SHIRTINGS. 



Cheviots, 

English & 
French 
Flannels 
& Silk 
Shirtings, 



For Tennis, 

" Bailwaj Car, 

" Steamer Trav- 
" elling, 

" Hunting, 

" Fishing, 

" Yachting. 

Always in stock or 

made to special 

measure. 



NOYES BROS. 

Washington and Summer Sts. 

BOSTON, U..-S. A, 



London Tan Street G-loves, warranted, at 
$1.35, at Noyes Bros. 

Dress Shirts, for Weddings, for Receptions, 
for Dinner Parties, with Collars, Cuffs, and 
Cravats, in the latest English styles. Plain 
French Bosoms, fine Embroidered Spots, 
Figures and Cords, at Noyes Bros. 

English Cheviots, English and French Flan- 
nels, Silk and Wool and Fure Silk Shirt- 
ings, for Tennis, for Steamer Travelling, 
for Hunting'and Fishing, for Railway and 
Yachting. Always in stock or made to 
special measure, at Noyes Bros. 

English Mackintosh Coats, for Ladies and 
Gentlemen, at Noyes Bros. 

English Kugs and Shawls, for Steamer and 
Railway use, at Noyes Bros. 

English Flannel, Blanket and Shawl Wraps, 
for the Sick-Room, for Steamer and Railway 
Travelling. For the bath and house use they 
are indispensable. $3.25 to $65.00. 

English Neckwear, at Noyes Bros. 



Full Evening Dress Shirts, 
Collars and Cravats 

Constantly on hand, for Dinner Parties, 
Weddings, or any occasion. 

The present English Fashion of shirts made 
with Linen Cords and Spot Bosoms may be 
had of Noyes Bros. 



ENGLISH DRESSING GOWNS, 

JACKETS AND WRAPS 



Lawn Tennis Shirts, Coats and Hose. 



TENNIS BELTS AND CAPS in Stock and 
made to measure from choice styles of ENG- 
LISH FLANNELS. 

GLOVES of Every Description, for Dress, 
Street, Driving, and the famous London Tan, 
at $r-35) at Noyes Bros. 



Underwear and Hosiery, in Pure Silk, Lambs' 
Wool, Merino, Balbriggan and English Cotton, 
for early fall wear, at Noyes Bros. 

English Flannel Pajamas, Long Flannel 
Night Shirts and Wraps, for steamer and rail- 
way travelling, at Noyes Bros. 



JURORS' A WARD for beauty of work- 
manship and design, and distinguished 
excellence in the manufacture 
of Shirts, to 

NOYES BEOS. 

Washington and Summer Streets, 
BOSTON, U. S. A. 



ESTABLISHED 181V. 



JOHN H. PRAY, SONS & CO. 

Importers, Jolliers, Retailers anl Manufacturers' Jgents 

Carpetings, Mattings, Oil Cloth, 

ORIENT JlI RUGS, 

CARPETS AND UPHOLSTERY. 



558 and 560 Washington St., 

30 to 34 Harrison Ave. Extension, 



BOSTON. 



113 Worth Street 



NEW YORK. 



Lasell Leaves. 



57 



A. STOWELL & CO. 

24 Winter Street, Boston, 



^oirie of our Specialties : 

Bohemian Garnet Jewelry. 
Amber Beads and Ornaments. 
Tortoise-Shell Hair* Pins. 
Choice Leather Goods. 
Oxidized Silver Jewelry. 
Fans for all occasions. 
Pearl Opera Glasses. 
Fine Gold Jewelry. 

Wedding Presents in Clocks, Vases and 
Bronzes. 

LATEST NOVELTIES IN ALL DEPARTMENTS. 
Lowest Prices. 



< 
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s 

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PQ 

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YOUNG LADIES' 

BOOTS, SHOES AND SLIPPERS, 

Stylish and Durable at Moderate Prices. 

GYMNASIUM SHOES A SPFXIALTY. 

Thayer, McNeil & Hodgkins, 

47 TEMPLE PL. = - BOSTON 

ARTHUR P. SCHMIDT & CO. 

IMPORTERS OF AND DEALERS IN 

FOREIGN AND AMERICAN 

Sheet Music. 

Sole Agents lor Litoirrs CeleBrated Edition of 
Classical and Modern Music. 

13 AND 15 WEST ST., BOSTON. 

Catalogues sent free on application. 

BOSTON FOREIGN BOOK STORE. 

BOOKS IN ALL FOREIGN LANGUAGES, 

CARL SCHOENHOF, 

144 Tremont Street - - - - One Flight Up. 

PALMER, BACHELDER& CO. 



HAVE 



CLASS RINGS, QUEEN CHAINS, 

Gold Bangles, Bracelets, Bonnet Pins, Lace Pins, 

Brooches, Collar Studs, Sleeve Buttons, 

Cuff Fasteners. 

OPERA GLASSES, FRENCH CLOCKS, 

Choice Articles in Pottery, 

AND 

PRESENTATION SILVER WARE, 

AT 

NO. 146 TREMONT ST., BOSTON. 

PALMER, BACHELDER & CO. 

ESTABLISHED IS-+O. 

Isaac Locke & Company, 

Produce Commission Merchants, 

And Dealers in 

FOREIGN and DOMESTIC FRUITS 

97, 99 and 101 Faneuil Hall Market, and Basement 18 south Side, 

BOSTON - - - MASS. 

jfiS* Telephone Connection, 



5» 



Lasell Leaves. 



■^WEBER'S* 



25, 27 TEMPLE PLACE 



- BOSTON, 



J±ND 33 WEST STREET, 

Ladies' and Gents' Restaurant, 

Oysters and Salads a Specialty. 

OPEN AFTER THEATRES. 

Caterer for Wedding Breakfasts, Lunches, Dinner and Evening Parties 

and Receptions. Also, Club Suppers at Short Notice 

and Reasonable Prices. 

S. W. BAILEY, 

— DEALER IN — 

WATCHES, JEWELRY, SILVERWARE, ETC. 

353 Washington Street, Boston. 

Jewelry Neatly Repaired. Also, Monograms on Coin Pieces. Personal 
Attention given to Repairing Fine Watches. 

ESTABLISHED 1847- 



AARON K. GAY & CO. 

No. 122 State Street, Boston, 

STATIONERS 



■AND 



BLANK BOOK MANUFACTURERS, 



First-Class Account Books of any desired 
pattern made to order. 

S. S. GAY. EDWIN W. GAY, 

JUST WHAT HAS BEEN WANTED. 

A LADIES' LUNCH ROOM 

HAS BEEN OPENED AT 

23 AVON STREET, BOSTON. 

A quiet, neat place, where a nice Lunch can be had at a very reason- 
able price. All the ladies say, " Is n't it nice ? " 

T. D. COOK, Caterer. 

ALSO, 

"Wedding and other Parties 

Served with the Choicest Viands, and by Competent Waiters. 

SUPERIOR ICE-CREAM 

DELIVERED AT REASONABLE PRICES. 



4- 



THE 



-•*- 



YOUTH'S COMPANION, 

A WEEKLY PAPER FOR 

YOUNG PEOPLE and the FAMILY. 

It aims to be a favorite in every family — looked for eagerly 
by the young folks, and read with interest by the older. Its purpose is to 
interest while it amuses; to be judicious, practical, sensible, and to have 
really permanent worth, while it attracts for the hour. 

It is handsomely illustrated, ard has for contributors some of 
the most attractive writers in the country. 

Subscription Price, $1.75. Specimen copies sent free. Please 
mention in what paper you read this advertisement. 

PERRY MASON &. CO. 

41 TEMPLE PLACE, BOSTON, MASS. 



FINE FURS. 

The best quality of all kinds of Furs in popular use. 

Seal English Jackets, 

Seal Dolman Wraps. 

Seal Sacques. 

We give particular attention to orders by measure, and using the 
richest and most durable of genuine Alaska Seals, assure the fullest 
satisfaction in quality and fit. 

The fashionable 

BLACK BEAR BOAS, 

of exquisite fineness and beauty, made from skins of rare quality. 

Fur dollars, Capes, Cuffs, Boas, 

Hats, Sleighing Hoods and Gloves, 

FUR TRIMMINGS. ' 

Gentlemen's Fur-lined Overcoats. 

Fur Mats and Carriage Robes. 

Joseph A. Jackson, 

412 Washington Street - - Boston. 



Established 1825. 



NATHAN NEAT & CO. 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

-i--^KT<<« IrTTILNrrE] -*-^©sr-«- 







BASKET TRUNKS AND STEAMER CHAIRS. 
Stateroom and Light-Weight Trunks for European Travel. 



SEND FOR ILLUSTRATED CATALOGUE. 



^6 WASHINGTON ST., BOSTON, MASS. 

The Archway Bookstore, 

365 WASHINGTON STREET, BOSTON. 



Our stock is one of the largest and most complete to be found in the 
city, including books in all departments of literature, and our prices are 
noted as being always the lowest. 

Catalogues of Books at Special Reductions 

SENT FREE TO ANY ADDRESS. 

DeWolfe, Fiske & Company. 



Lasell Leaves. 



59 



EDWIN C. BURT & CO.'S 

FINE SHOES AND SLIPPERS 

FOR LADIES AND CHILDREN 

ARE THE BEST SHOES MADE. 



Fit Perfectly. 
Easy on the Feet, 
Superior in Style, 



Cost no More 

Than any Other 

Fine Shoes. 




For sale by leading retail shoe dealers in nearly every city throughout the United States and 
Canada. All widths of Lasts, any style of Shoe, Sole, Toe, or Heel. If yon cannot 
get our make of shoes from your dealers, send address for directions how to procure them. 

EDWIN C. BURT & CO., Manufacturers, 

NEW YORK. 

SPECIAL AOENTS IN BOSTON, 

JORDAN, MARSH & CO., WASHINGTON ST. 



Mr. JOSEPH A. HILLS 

has removed to more commo- 
dious musie rooms in 

HOTEL PELHAM, 
Cor. Tremont and Boylston Sts., 

BOSTON, MASS., 

where he will be pleased to meet 
his pupils and others for pro- 
fessional engagements. 

Competent assistants under Mr. 
Hills' s supervision will attend to 
the instruction of those less ad- 
vanced who mag desire lessons 
at reduced rates. 



Conductors, Concert, Opera and 
Church Singers, Pianists, Organ- 
ists, Accompanists and Teachers 
supplied at the 

MUSIC TEACHERS' BUREAU, 

HOTEL PELHAM, 

BOSTON, MASS. 



CONOVER BROTHERS' CO. 
piaQofort^/r\ai)ufy 

14th St. and 9th Ave,, New York. 

Clear, silvery, even tone through- 
out. Durable and elegant design. 
Indorsed by the profession. 

BOSTON WAREROOMS, 

Hotel Pelham. 



THE "PEERLESS" FOUNTAIN PEN 




IS THE PERFECTION OF FOUNTAIN PENS. 

Is a hard rubber holder fitted with a 16 k. gold pen of the best manufacture, and will never wear out. It will write ten thousand words with one 
filling of ink, and for taking lectures, etc., it is indispensable. There is no loss of time in dipping ink as with the ordinary pen, as the " Peerless " 
has a perfect, even and uninterrupted flow of ink, and is the best fountain pen manufactured. Price, $3.00. 

The Cross Stylographic Pen, Stylographic Ink. All styles of Stylographic, Fountain, and Gold Pens repaired. 



THE CROSS PEN CO., *o6 Washington St. 



BOSTON, MASS. 



3STE2CT 330033, TO OLD SOTXTia: CHTTBCH. 



6o 



Lasell Leaves. 



C. H. CODMAN & CO. 

Photographic Material, 

PICTURE and FRAME DEALERS' 

<A SUPPLIES O ' 
Wholesale and Retail Framing 

AMATEUR PHOTOGRAPHIC APPARATUS. 

34 BROMFIELD STREET, 

BOSTON - - - MASS. 

W. H. FRENCH & CO. 

PLUMBERS, GAS FITTERS, 

AND 

SANITARY ENGINEERS. 

JUDSON'S BUILDING, OPP. RAILROAD STATION, 

WEST NEWTON. 



All Work Promptly Attended to and Warranted Satisfactory, 

LIVERY, HACK, 



^jsrr> 



BOARDING STABLE. 

ESTABLISHED 1861. 

S. F. CATE, WEST NEWTON. 



Barge "City of Newton." 

Boat Sleigh "Snow Bird." 

H. H. NEWELL, 

DEALER IN 

BOOTS, SHOESS RUBBERS. 

Auburn Street, Auburndale, Mass. 



ZION'S HERALD. 

A Weekly Religious Journal. 

The Oldest Methodist Paper in the World. 

Rev. B. K. PEIRCE, D. D., Editor. 



It has more than two hundred contributors. All departments well 
organized and furnishing interesting reading matter for all classes, having 
Religious, Secular, Domestic and Foreign Intelligence, also an Agricul- 
tural Department, second to no paper of its class. 

For Business Men, it is oae cf the Best Advertising Mediums. 
Read by probably 50,000 people weekly in New England. Address, 



HLONZO S. MG6D, PUBLISHGR, 
36 BROMFIELD ST., BOSTON, MASS. 

a.I-.t_,:e:n" <fe barry, 

House and Sign. Painters, Grlazing, Graining, 

Kalsomining and. "Whitening. 

Paints, Oils and Varnishes constantly on hand. 

WASHINGTON ST. (near R. R. Crossing), WEST NEWTON. 

C. T. Allen. D. Barry. 

H. H. HUNT, 

CARPENTER AND BUILDER, 

WEST NEWTON, MASS. 
Shop near K. R. Crossing, P, 0. Box 235. 

WAPTl % Pn CARRIAGE AND WAGON BUILDERS, 
l» nilJJ 01 UU. , Cor, Elm and Washiugton Sts. , near City Hall, 

"WEST ITEWTON. 
Fine Carriages and Wagons of any description built to order and War- 
ranted to give satisfaction. Carr.age Painting and Repairing in all its 
branches promptly and thoroughly executed at fair prices. The Repair- 
ing of Fine Carriages a Specialty. 

Carriages Sent for and Returned Free of Charge. 

Boston Gossamer Rubber Co, 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

Gossamer Clothing. 

LEATHER COATS AND VESTS, 

HOOP-SKIRTS AND BUSTLES. 

611 Washington St., Boston, Mass, 

S. KLODS, Treasurer. 

B. G. BAKER, 

COAL AND WOOD. 

Auburndale and West Newton, 



Lasell Leaves. 




THOMAS HALL, 

Electrician 



•AND' 



Optician. 



Manufacturer and Importer of 

Telegraphic, Electric, Hag- 

netic, UalTanic, Optical 

and JHetooroiogleal 

Instruments. 

Chemicals, Chemical and Philo- 
sophical AppurutuD of all Descrip- 
tions. Illustrated Catalogue of 
each Department, 

Hall's Pat. Medical Batteries. 
19 BROMTIELD ST., BOSTON, MASS. 

1835, Daniel Davis, Jr. 1849, Palmtr ft Hall. 1356, Thomas Ball. 

WADSWORTH & PICKERING, 

COMMISSION MERCHANTS, AND JOBBERS IN 

BUTTER, CHEESE, EGGS, ETC. 

STALL, 89 QUINCY MARKET, EOSTON. 

Briggs Wadsworth. F. A. Pickering. 

CHARLES H. WHITING, Formerly Hall k Whiting, 

STATIONER and BLANK BOOK MANUFACTURER 

Importer and Jobber. Publisher and Book Seller. School and Miscel- 
laneous Books. Crane's Fine Stationery. American, English, French 
and German Fancy and Staple Stationery. Weston's Ledger Papers. 

163 and 170 Devonshire Street, Eoaton. 



FROST & ADAMS, 

Importers of, and Wholesale and Betall Dealers la 

ARTISTS' MATERIALS, 

DECORATIVE ART NOVELTIES, ART 
POTTERY, ETC. 



Ebonized Panels. 

Winsor & Newton's Colors. 

German Colors. 

French Colors. 

Tucker & Green's Colors. 

Sketch Blocks. 

Plaques of all kinds. 

China Colors. 

Mirrors for Decorating. 

Artists' Boxes. 

Artists' Brushes. 

Artists' Canvas. 

Handbooks on Art. 

Studies of all kinds. 

Lustra Painting Materials. 



Water-Colors. 

Bronzes. 

Brocades. 

Spangles. 

China for Decorating. 

Paper Panels. 

Tambourines. 

Repousse Materials. 

Canvas Stretched. 

Drawing Instruments. 

Plaque Rims. 

Artists' Easels. 

Drawing Paper. 

Materials for Tapestry, etc. 

Kensington Painting Materials. 



SCHOOLS tf> STUDENTS SUPPLIED 

AT LOW FIGURES. 

37 CORNHILL - - BOSTON. 

SEND FOR A CATALOGUE. 
F. S. Frost. H. A. Lawrence. 



ELLIOT W. KEYES, 

APOTHECARY, 



Haskins' Block - - 

auburndali 



Auburn Street, 

MASS. . 



FALL AND WINTER MILLINERY. 

MRS. M. H. KIMBALL., 

Dealer in FRENCH FLOWERS, HATS, BONNETS and TRIMMINGS, 

MELROSE STREET, AUBURNDALE. 

V. A. PLUTA, 

Dealer in PROVISIONS, 

Cor. Auburn and Lexington Street s. 

ALFRED BRUSH, 

APOTHECARY, 

Plummer's Block, Cor. of Auburn and Lexington Sts. 

auburnoale. 



MRS. L. 


COOK, 


PIDIilRlilElilSlilSPIMIilAlilKlilElilR: 


Woodbine Street - 


- Auburndale. 



GEORGE E. JOHNSON, 



■DEALER IN- 



Hay, Grain and Feed, 

Lexington Street, 

AUBURNDALE, MASS. 

CHARLES G. TINKHAM, 

Livery, Hack and Boarflii Silt, 

Cor. of Lexington and Severn Sts., 
AUBURNDALE. 

JOHNSTON & KEYES, 

AUBURNDALE AND BOSTON EXPRESS. 



FARNUM &, COMPANY, 
PRODUCE COMMISSION MERCHANTS, 

Wholesale Dealers in Apples, Potatoes, Cranberries, Onions, Peas, 
Beans, Dried Apples, Oranges and Lemons. 

Nos. 108 and no Faneull Hall Market - • BOSTON. 

Hbhry Farni/m. W, W, Lawkence. 



BOSTON OFFICES, 

10S Arch Street. 
34 Court Square. 



AUBURNDALE OFFICE, 

Lexington Street, 
Near the Depot 



H. EUGENE FLEMING, PH. Q. 

PHARMACIST, 

FINE CONFECTIONERY a Specialty. 

Hear City HaU • . Weat Newton, Maw. 




|fe#*V^ i^- '" ,si«S|P 



JANUARY, 1888. 




L/^ecc lEf\\/qs 



VOLUME XIII. -No. 4. 



CONTENTS. 



Editorials 

The Isthmus of Panama . . 
The Autobiography of a Jockey Cap 



• 63 
. 65 
. 66 



Going Westward 67 

A Romance of Fort Saint Louis 69 

A Study 70 

Political Notes 70 

Scientific Notes 71 



Art Notes 71 

Major and Minor 71 

Temperance . 72 

Exchanges 72 

Christmas at Lasell 72 

Locals 73 

Carlton Perkins Patillo 74 

Personals 74 



Lasell Leaves. 



NOVELTIES 



OUR SPECIALTIES. 



■IN — 



MILLINERY 



RECEIVED DAILY FROM PARIS and LONDON, 



Ladies are invited to call and examine before purchasing 
elsewhere. Correct Styles. Popular prices. 



HENRY M. BURR & CO. 



490 Washington Street, 



BOSTON. 



AMERICAN WATCHES, 

DIHMONDS, 

Sterling Silver Ware, French Clocks and Bronzes, Fine 
Plated Ware, Jewelry and Fancy Goods. 

Designs and estimates for class rings, pins and badges furnished 
without charge. 



N. G. WOOD & SON, 

444 Washington Street, Boston. 

LAWRENCE, WILDE & CO. 

Manufacturers of First-Class 

FURNITURE 



AND 



INTERIOR DECORATIONS, 

Nos. 38 to 48 Cornhill - - Boston. 



A. Lawrencb. 
Wm. H. Hull. 



Geo. B. D arrow. 
F. D. Wilde. 



ESTABLISHED 1830. 



ALFRED MUDGE & SON, 

PRINTERS, 

No. 24 FRANKLIN STREET, BOSTON, MASS. 

HAVE UNSURPASSED FACILITIES FOR 

-BjrQK AND MISCELLANEOUS PRINTING, 

ELECTROTYPING AND STEREOTYPING, 

MERCANTILE AND COMMERCIAL PRINTING, 

FANCY BALL AND SOCIETY PRINTING. 



LAW WORK A SPECIALTY. 

A FULL LINE OF WEDDING STATIONERY ENGRAVED OR PRINTED. 

WEDDING OUTFITS executed In the finest manner at reasonable prices. 

Information regarding work In any department will at all times be promptly furnished, either 
personally or by correspondence. 

ALFRED MUDGE & SON, 24 FRANKLIN STREET. 



Lasell Leaves. 



6r 



C. D. COBB & BROS. 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 

GROCERIES 

Of the Very Finest Quality, 

And IMPORTERS of 

-8FANCY GRADES TEASe- 

Every Article Warranted. 



Orders of $20 and upwards Delivered at any 
point within lOO miles of Boston. 



FOR PARTICULARS, SEND TOR CATALOGUE TO 

C. D. Cobb & Bros. 

722 to 732 Washington Street, 
BOSTON - - - MASS. 



COBB, BATES & YERXA, 

IMPORTJSRS 



AND 



GROCERS. 



Twenty-dollar orders delivered free at any station 
within 50 miles of Boston, and fifty-dollar orders at 
any station in New England, at our regular retail prices 



COBB, BATES k YERXA, 

680 to 692 Washington Street, 
3 Bow&oin Sguare, 

6 and 8 Faneu.il Hall Scjua re 



Also in 



CHELSEA, FALL EIVEE and TAUNTON. 



T. E. MOSELEY & CO. 



DEALERS IN 



BOOTS, SHOES, RUBBERS, ETC. 

FOR LADIES, GENTLEMEN, BOYS, 
MISSES AND CHILDREN. 

A Large Assortment for 

YOUNG LHDIES. 



GYMNASIUM SHOES 

In Great Variety. 

ENGLISH LAST WALKING BOOTS, 

In CALF or GOAT, 
Are SENSIBLE, DURABLE, and REASONABLE in Price, 



T. E. MOSELEY & CO. 

469 Washington Street, 

BOSTON. 



GOOD MUSIC FOR ALL THE YEA R ROUND. 

Is found in such books as the following, which, when kept at hand, fur- 
nish unfailing entertainment for the player or singer. 

Song Classics for Low Voices. 

(one dollar.) 
About 50 Gems of Song by the best modern composers; Rubinstein-, 
Lassen, Grieg, Gounod and others. A true treasure for Alto, Baritone 
and Bass Voices. 

SONG- CLASSICS. 

(one dollar.) 

For voices of average compass. All selected from the best sources. 

DPIAINTO CLASSICS. 

(ONE DOLLAR.) 

_ An admirable collection of pieces in the best taste, by some of the best 
living composers. 

YOUNG- PEOPLE'S CLASSICS. 

(ONE DOLLAR.) 
Easy pieces that will please all, young or old. 

The Good Old Songs We Used to Sing. 
($t.oo paper; $1.25 bds.1 

A grand good new book, which will be received with open arms in 
every household. About 120 songs, with piano or organ accompaniment. 
Each one has been a distinguished success. Many are new to the pres- 
ent generation. Mailed for Retail Price. 

OLIVER DITSON & CO., BOSTON. 



GEO. E. ALLEN, 



12 Winter Street - - - - Boston. 

BUTTONS. LACES, YARNS. CORSETS, 

AND FANCY GOODS. 



VOUNG'S HOTEL 

RUPOPf 



EUROPEAN PLAN. 

OPPOSITE THE HEAD OF STATF. STREET, B05TOH. 

Ladies' entrance, Court Street, near Washington Street. 

J. R. WHIPPLE, PROPRIETOR. 



62 



Lasell Leaves. 



HASTINGS. 



3he j> 



HOTOGRAPHER. 



We offer 1© If)e. (spaautafmer arja Llrjaei? 
Ciletsses, etrja also f® trjeip rjurrjepous pierjas, 
unusuerl ad^Grrjicrqes, k©fr) |©p excellence ©J 

PHOTOGRAPHIC WORK 

Gtrja peasorjerkle prices. YSZe crusparifee Ir;© 

rnosf e/iriisiio ]gP00."ucfi©r)s irjetele. 



No. 147 Tremont Street 

corner of West Street, 



BOSTON 



MASS. 



LADIES' FINE FOOTWEAR. 



We have added for Fall and Winter, many new lines, including 
specialties of which we have exclusive control. 



GYMNASIUM SHOES, 
WEDDING AND PARTY 
BOOTS AND SLIPPERS. 



HENRY H. TUTTLE & CO. 

436 Washington Street, 
BOSTON. 




THE CLASSY 






PHOTOGRAPHER 



'*S- 



For Lasell Seminary, 
~*'88+~ 



Studio, 22 Winter Street, 



BOSTON. 



LASELL LEAVES. 



DUX FEMINA FACTI. 



Volume XII 



LASELL SEMINARY, AUBLipEALE, MASS,, JANUARY, lBflB. 



Number 4, 



LASELL LEAVES. 



Published Monthly, during the School Year, 



Lasell Publishing Association 



LASELL SEMINARY FOR YOUNG WOMEN, 
Auburndale, Mass. 

Edito r-in-Ch icf. 
MARY LOUISE COLE, '88. 

Local Editor. 
ELIZABETH M. CAMPBELL. 



Political Editor. 
GRACE C. HUNTINGTON, 

Scientific Editor. 
JULIA L. COY. 

Musical Editor. 
MAUDE OLIVER, '89. 



Art Editor. 
GRACE W. SKINNER. 

Exchange Editor. 
HELEN R. GILBERT, '89. 

Business Ma nager. 
A. LINA JONES, '88. 



Subscription Agent. 
ANNETTE V. McDONALD. 



TERMS, IN ADVANCE. 

One Copy, one year (including postage) . . $1.00 
Single Numbers . . . . . . -IS cts. 

ADVERTISING RATES. 



SPACE. 


3 MONTHS. 


6 MONTHS. 


9 MONTHS. 


I -12 column .... 


#1.50 


#2.50 


$3-5° 


1-6 ' 




3.00 


S.OO 


7.00 


i-4 




4.OO 


6.5O 


9.00 


1-2 




6.5O 


11.00 


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3-4 




9.OO 


15.00 


20.00 


1 ' 




I2.00 


19.00 


25.00 



Press of Alfred Mudge & Son, 24 Franklin St., Boston. 



Last September, George William Curtis, writ- 
ing in Harper's Monthly, declared Commencement 
to be the most delightful season of the year. 
Then, the public mind was engrossed with the 
affairs of schools and colleges, and many had 
special interest in them ; but this interest could 
not have covered as broad a field, have been as 
far-reaching, as is that felt at Christmas time. 
Everybody knows of Christmas, even if they do 
not partake of its enjoyments ; but many scarcely 
know to what the word Commencement is applied. 
There are those who feel that if it is possible to 
overdo so good a thing, Christmas is in danger of 
being overdone. But surely our " good-will " can- 
not be shown too often or too freely, and at this 
time all try to make an extra effort to do some 
good or make somebody happier. Are we not in- 
clined to look at it coldly, — not to be enough 
enthused by the spirit of the holidays? To be 
sure, we buy presents and give them, but it is 
with a sigh of relief that we settle down once 
more in the old routine, thankful that " Christmas 
comes but once a year." 

The French furnish us a good example for 
enthusiasm. Whatever they undertake, or what- 
ever be the occasion, they enter into it heart and 
soul, not like us Americans, who are all the time 
storing up potential energy, but never converting 
it into kinetic. So with holidays in general, they 
are losing their old-time spirit, and through lack 
of proper celebration are becoming a bore. 

From the time when we begin to realize that 
Christmas is approaching, until a few days after 
New-Year, a garment of graciousness and good- 
will seems to cloth the earth. Christmas Day a 
climax is reached, and we shower our love and 
regard on others by way of presents; but New- 
Year's Day, it is not so especially with others as 
with ourselves that we hold council. This day is 
but a calm inlet in the swift current of life, in 



6 4 



Lasell Leaves. 



which we rest for a moment and gather strength 
to meet the obstacles ahead. We have a broader 
retrospect than ever before, and, as we meditate, 
we can see wherein mistakes could have been 
avoided, and resolve to let them stand for ex- 
amples in the future. Our accustomed toils are 
resumed with new vigor for a time, but soon we 
forget that a new year has been ushered in, and 
often we are caught in the same snares that held 
us in the reign of the old year. 

But any mention of New-Year would be incom- 
plete without some reference to the everywhere 
present calendar. The "Cupid" and "Sun- 
shine " calendars have had their day, and those 
more enduring have taken their place. Our 
poets each have their year in which they reign 
supreme, teaching us daily lessons by the musical 
rhythm of their words. Last year Browning held 
sway, but at present the Lowell calendar is in the 
ascendancy. 

Formerly calendars assumed principally the 
shape of an advertisement, and besides the card 
itself, telling you where to get your house in- 
sured, when the leaflet for one month was torn 
off, you saw with surprise, instead of the next 
month's numbered page, a subtly contrived let- 
tered one, which you must needs read before 
proceeding. Then came little slips glued to- 
gether, each containing some appropriate senti- 
ment, and there was a keen sense of enjoyment in 
reading each day's verse, and one was sometimes 
more or less influenced by its lesson. Curiosity, 
however, would often cause the slips for several 
days to be half torn off, just to see what was said 
for those days. Then these must all be saved for 
future perusal, which perusal usually resulted in 
casting them into the fire. 

The present calendar is in book form, each leaf 
containing golden thoughts from the chosen 
author, and is so arranged that the book may be 
kept open at any one of the pages. Besides this, 
perhaps at one side, are glued slips, each one 
lasting during a week. 

The owner of a calendar containing only the 
glued strips is very often found to judge from 
the " left-on " slips to have " lost his reckoning," 
and while he is taking in the balmy air of spring, 
his calendar is telling that winter is not yet 
ended. 



There is one book that is no longer numbered 
among the many which are necessary for a well- 
regulated individual to possess, and that is the 
antograph album. 

The library may be teeming with gilt-edged vol- 
umes, and scores of wise-looking editions, but a 
small corner on the lower shelf is reserved for 
those little books, so dearly cherished, which are 
especially personal property. These are the auto- 
graph and photograph albums and journals kept 
in former years. The albums have endured so 
many vicissitudes in shape and style, that now in- 
stead of the diminutive, simple covered book, we 
have, if any at all, large, elegantly bound ones. 

But the autograph album, which never failed to 
be presented to a new-comer for his signature, has 
almost passed out of existence. 

A well-known writer, in speaking recently of the 
worth and worthlessness of college traditions, re- 
grets that the old autograph album has lost its 
place as a factor of education, and also alludes to 
the mania for the autographs of great men which 
at one time prevailed. He adds that hundreds of 
dollars would have been given for such a collec- 
tion of authors' names as appears on the copyright 
petition lately drawn up for presentation to Con- 
gress. He argues that this album is an educator, 
in that it furnishes good field for character study, 
but this seems to us absurd. It is with a sense of 
interest that we peruse its pages, but in the com- 
mon, every-day sort of an album, with its verses 
which have been repeated from time immemorial, 
such as, — 

Remember me, my friend, I pray, 
Remember me when far away, 
Remember me as now you do, 
Remember me, and I will you. 

In memory's casket drop one tear for me. 

Forget me not, forget me never, 
Till yonder sun shall set forever. 

where is the thirst for knowledge satisfied ? 

We are not all on intimate enough terms with 
the poets of our time to ask each for some special 
verse. Our poets do bestow upon their friends 
some of the purest gems of thought, but unfortu- 
nately the budding poet acquaintances of most 
of us will never blossom into Whittiers and Low- 
ells. 



Lasell Leaves. 



65 



Gushing, or the custom of expressing a super- 
abundance of appreciation for a person, place, or 
thing, has become so much of a habit with young 
people that they do it unconsciously, and some- 
times it is very amusing. Thus a person accus 
tomecl to say, "Oh, how lovely!" and "That 's the 
sweetest thing I ever saw," to everything, will 
admire with the same fervor a fine oil painting 
and a rag baby. There is very little satisfaction 
in presenting objects to such a person for ap- 
proval, for you know beforehand just what she 
will say, and just how she will say it. 

A story is told of a certain young lady, who, 
upon meeting for the first time a noted author, 
expressed to him in most eloquent words her 
adoration of his works. Shortly afterwards the 
young lady's papa invited the author to lunch, 
much to the gratification of his daughter. When 
everything was in readiness she noticed that not a 
single edition of their guest's works was in the 
library. Thereupon she was obliged to order a 
whole set, in order to show her complete ado- 
ration. 

At this season of the year we are at a loss how 
best to show our appreciation, but one thing 
which is quite certain is that a " Thank you " 
from the heart is more expressive than a whole 
dictionary full of uttered words. 



THE ISTHMUS OF PANAMA. 

Neptune had received his tribute, and was 
appeased. Cape Hatteras. with all its terrors, 
was far in the distance, and we had safely passed 
through the much dreaded Carribean Sea. We 
were eight days out from New York, when, much 
reduced in avoirdupois but with buoyant spirits, 
we saw the blue hills of the Isthmus rising in the 
distance. It was our first sight of land, except 
the glimpse we had of Cuba as we went flying 
past. 

As we entered the harbor of Aspinwall, we 
stood on the deck in a pouring rain, gazing with 
eager interest at the city, with its led roofs and 
waving palm-trees. About noon we reached the 
wharf, crowded with Jamaica negroes of all sizes, 
and with but here and there a white face visible. 
Having a few hours to wait before crossing, we 



started for an exploration of the town, in spite of 
the fact that it was the fever as well as the rainy 
season here. We found it a dirtv place, with 
poorly built houses and with the stores wide open 
to the street. Nearly every nation is represented 
here, and amid the swarm of negroes, who crowd 
the narrow streets, are to be seen sleepy-eyed 
Chinese, Germans, Italians, Yankees, always 
ready to make a penny, and the omnipresent Jew, 
who, at evtry corner, offers for sale his diamonds 
of the first water for seventy five cents and there- 
abouts. Here and there in the crowd may be 
seen the red and blue uniforms of the native 
policemen, — mere boys, with brown complexions 
and Spanish like faces, bearing muskets taller than 
themselves. Everything — stores, streets, dwell- 
ing-places, and people — is dirty. There are a 
few large, well-built houses which are owned by 
the Panama -Railroad and the Canal Companies. 
The railroad, which carried us across, terminates 
at the wharf, and has cars like our Northern roads, 
but on a much cheaper scale, both first and sec- 
ond class. The travel across is monopolized by 
the Panama Railroad. Until recently, the fare was 
about twenty-five dollars for a single passage, and 
the cost for transporting baggage was correspond- 
ingly high. Now the fare is reduced to about ten 
dollars for foreigners and four for natives. Guards 
are stationed along the road to see that no one 
walks across on the track or on the clearing made 
by it. If a person is found so doing, he is forced 
to pay his fare. The distance is about fifty miles, 
and the run is made in between two and three 
hours. 

About four, we started across the Isthmus on 
the ever-to-be-remembered ride between the con- 
tinents, from ocean to ocean, in the very fulness 
of the tropics, and upon a road fairly built upon 
human bodies, — so fatal is the miasma to all 
imported laborers. The ride was a rare revelation. 
All was substantially new to our unused Northern 
eyes, and we stared and wondered during all this 
tropical passage. The rain cooled the air, so we 
did not suffer from the heat. Indeed, we could 
not have been more comfortable during a ride in 
New England, at the same time of year. 

Here Nature holds full sway, and there is no 
limit to the variety or abundance of tree and 
shrub, of plant and flower and grass. Palms 



66 



Lasell Leaves. 



grow singly and in groups ; there are forests of 
ferns as large as trees ; bananas and plantains, 
with their great bunches of fruit partially hidden 
by the broad leaves, are growing on all sides ; 
cocoanuts and bread-fruits are ripening and rot- 
ting out of man's reach; big oaks, little oaks, and 
trees of every family are interlaced so closely 
that it is impossible to tell where one begins and 
the other leaves off ; vines of every kind, with great 
rope-like stems or delicate tendrils, are running 
up, running down, running over, and overgrowing 
everything; flowers of every variety — great gor- 
geous blooms or delicate blossoms — are seen 
wherever we look. 

On the eastern side the country is low and 
marshy, and in these swamps, out of which comes 
the fetid breath of the fever, the negroes build 
their homes. In these little miserable thatched 
huts they live in the greatest of filth and 
squalor. 

As the train stopped at the crowded settle- 
ments, the negroes swarmed to the cars, clad in 
every degree of quantity and cleanliness of cloth- 
ing. The women favor the Mother Hubbard 
style of dress, and delight in the characteristic 
furbelows, jewelry, and gaudy colors of the 
negress. Their heads, adorned with flaming ban- 
dannas, are their only beas's of burden ; on these 
many stalwart negresses in the crowd balanced 
bundles both great and small. As a rule, there is 
very little time spent in dressing, and on all sides 
rollicking babies and half-grown children may be 
seen au naturel. 

The railroad has not lost its novelty for them, 
and even yet they have not learned to conduct 
themselves with proper care when near it. The 
fearlessness with which they jump off and on the 
cars, while in motion, makes Prudence shudder. 
Accidents are a most common occurrence ; daily 
one or more people are killed on account of their 
recklessness. 

The negroes are a wretchedly lazy set, living on 
the fruit nature so abundantly provides them, 
and the vegetables they can get with little or no 
cultivation. They toil not. Their only work is 
provided by the Panama Railroad and Canal 
Companies, and by the latter company none is 
done at present. The canal and railroad run side 
by side for a long distance. The engines and 



implements of labor are seen lying round, but not 
a person working. 

As we approach the Panama side, the country 
grows hilly, and the scenery correspondingly 
pretty. It is on account of these hills that work 
is suspended now on the canal. At present peo- 
ple know of no way to get across but by blasting 
through the solid bed of the rock of the coast 
hills. On the other side of these hills lies Pan- 
ama. As we ride through the town, we find it 
very similar to Aspinwall, but larger, more 
cleanly, and with the appearance of greater civili- 
zation. At the wharf a lighter is waiting to 
carry us to the steamer which is to take us to 
California, away from the interesting and amusing 
scenes of the Isthmus. 

Panama has a past, for it was a rich and im- 
portant city; if the canal is finished, it will have 
a future. Now, it is the principal port of West- 
ern America ; then, it would be the most impor- 
tant port of the Western Hemisphere, and in its 
harbor would be seen the flags of every nation. 

J. w. 
THE AUTOBIOGRAPHY OF A JOCKEY CAP. 

I am only a jockey cap ; 
Once I was bright and new ; 
Now I am old and worn, 
And sadly tattered, too. 

The one short year that I spent before I came 
to Lasell was very pleasant for me. In Sep- 
tember, '83, I lay on the counter of a large fur- 
nishing store in Boston, with a number of rela- 
tives and friends. Our family (the true "Har- 
vard Crimson"), though aristocratic, is social, 
and I had many pleasant chats with k ' Columbia 
Blue," who lay beside me. As one after another 
of our companions left us, we used to wonder 
where they had gone, and longed for our turn to 
come. 

One morning a young man came in and asked 
to see some jockey caps. I smiled somewhat sar- 
castically as the clerk showed him an orange and 
black one, for I knew he was a Harvard man, and 
of course he did not want those colors. He gave 
the cap a scornful glance, and cast an approving 
smile on me. As the clerk came toward me, I 
bade a hasty good-by to all my friends. I was 
sorry to leave them, but was I not going forth into 



Lasell Leaves. 



6 7 



the world for the first time ? One glance at me 
satisfied the buyer, as I knew it would. He told 
the clerk he would take me, so I was wrapped in 
paper and shoved into his overcoat pocket. I was 
then fully started on my travels. I could see 
nothing, and was almost stifled, but I did not care. 
My owner (I learned afterwards lhat his name 
was Arthur) hurried along the crowded streets of 
Boston, and finally hailing a horse car, stepped in 
and sat down. For a time I heard only "Fare, 
please!" "Providence Station,"' "Tremont Street," 
etc. 

My owner was very quiet, but at Dana Street a 
friend got on the car, and they were soon busily 
engaged in conversation. Then I learned that I 
was on my way to Harvard, and that I was the 
property of a Senior. Oh, that my companions 
might hear of my good luck ! 

" Going to the game Friday ? " 

" Yes ; are you ? " 

" Of course. Got a new cap to-day." 

"Let 's see it." 

I was then hauled out for inspection, and after 
being duly looked over and admired, I was shoved 
into his pocket again. 

The subject of the renewed conversation was 
not interesting to me, being something about " as- 
tronomical observations," and I suppose I fell 
asleep, for when I awoke I was lying on a table in 
a room in Holworthy. I was alone until evening, 
when Arthur came in and hung me on a little 
hook by the fireplace. There I remained until 
Friday, two days afterwards. Then I went to wit- 
ness a base-ball game between Harvard and 
Princeton. 

What a gay scene it was ! Yellow, black, and 
red everywhere. I paid little attention to the 
game, as I was too busily occupied in recognizing 
my friends, and watching my second cousin, 
" Brown," who was carrying on a desperate flir- 
tation with a light-complexioned Panama. Har- 
vard won the game, and as Arthur remained on 
the campus, I had the opportunity of a talk with 
the charming Miss Panama, while my cousin 
looked on, fairly green with jealousy. Then we 
went home, tired, but pleased with the day's en- 
joyment. 

After that, for two months I was in constant 
demand, until I was discarded and hung upon the 



hook to remain until class day. It seemed as if 
it would never come. 

At last the day dawned bright and clear. About 
five in the afternoon, Arthur, attired in a dilapi- 
dated suit, placed me on his head, and joined the 
rest of his class, who were assembled in front of 
Holworthy. We made the tour of the yard, cheer- 
ing every building with three times three for Har- 
vard ; then we marched into the enclosure, where 
the tree stood, and where the exercises were to 
take place. The sight of so many richly dressed 
people made me ashamed of my looks, but it was 
too late for repentance, so I hid my blushes as 
well as I could. I was so absorbed in gazing at 
the people that time passed away quickly, and 
before I realized it, I was trampled under hun- 
dreds of feet. For an hour the bustle lasted, and 
I was unable to collect my scattered senses. When 
I finally got myself together, I was alone in the 
enclosure. I was too weak to move, so I lay on 
the ground bewailing my sad fate. Suddenly a 
young man and woman entered and came toward 
me. The young woman picked me up tenderly 
and said. " I am going to keep this as a memento 
of my first class day. Perhaps Frank wore it." 

She brought me home with her and kept me all 
summer. I know she prized me highly, for she 
would exhibit me proudly to all her friends. 
When she came to Lasell, she brought me with 
her, and hung me on her closet door. My only 
companions are a box of safety matches and a 
thermometer ; but just across the way is a charm- 
ing white felt hat, who smiles at me often and 
cheers my lonely days. Oh, that I were back in the 
store where I spent so many happy hours ! " Those 
were days when I was conscious of life, and did 
not feel myself almost as 

' Dead as the bulrushes 'round little Moses, 
On the old banks of the Nile.' " 

S. K. P. 



GOING WESTWARD. 

A charming day for Boston, and friends and 
relatives to see me comfortably settled in the three- 
o'clock train bound for Worcester, Springfield, and 
the West. Such a comfortable, tastefully ap- 
pointed sleeping car, that travelling seemed alto- 
gether delightful, — quite an ideal amusement, in 
fact ! And as for being tiresome, how could one 



68 



Lasell Leaves. 



be tired sitting on the softly cushioned seat, and 
watching the ever-changing prospect, which was a 
constant delight, with its many shades of dull-red 
and golden-brown, that were beautified and soft- 
ened by the slanting rays of the afternoon sun ? 
But soon a gray cloud drifted slowly across the 
sky and hid the sunset, and so the short winter 
day ended, and I was obliged to pull down the 
shade, and look for amusement at my fellow-pas- 
sengers, who were not uninteresting. There was 
the inevitable small boy with a well-developed 
fondness for whistling, and a big Waterbury watch, 
which he consulted so often and seemed so fond of 
that I could not refrain from asking the time, 
which he told me very accurately, even to the half- 
minute. 

Then there was the omnipresent man in the long 
gray ulster and skull-cap, who always seems to 
be especially in his element as a traveller ; a fat 
lady, who assumed a protecting air towards her 
thin, bilious-looking husband ; and a young Boston 
girl who was reading, not Browning, but " King 
Solomon's Mines." 
' After an uneventful night's rest, I awoke, to 
find that we were flying rapidly along by the lake, 
which was blue and sparkling in the sunlight. 
But as we came near Cleveland the sky grew 
smoky and dull, and the sun seemed to be shining 
through a dense, black fog. Is Cleveland smoky 
always, I wonder? If so, what a struggle it 
must be to keep one's face properly clean ! 

Here comes the conductor, and I must be sure 
I 'm in the right train, so I ask, "Does this car 
go through to Fort Wayne?" "Yes, miss," he 
says, tearing off a coupon from my ticket, "stay 
right wherre you arre, and you '11 git therre." But, 
alas ! it is always the over-cautious woman with 
her thousand useless inquiries who most often 
finds herself on the wrong train after all, and this 
was my case, as I learned a few moments later 
when, as 1 was gazing complacently out on the 
blue lake watching the clucks as they floated 
along on its smooth surface, another conductor 
demanded my ticket, and, on looking at it, said, 
'You're on the wrong train, miss; have to go 
back to Cleveland and wait till night." So back 
I went, not so melancholy as I should have been 
if I could not have rejoiced in the thought that 
the mistake was an official's and not my own. 



How should a whole day be spent in Cleveland, 
where rain and smoke were doing their best to 
try the patience of the active inhabitants ? There 
was no help for it, so, ascertaining that the train 
left at 7.15 p. m., I took some parcels to the pack- 
age-room, and ventured to inquire of the boy who 
received them what was the name of the principal 
street, and how to get to it. He answered, 
" Superior Street, — superior to all others." But 
his directions were so general that it seemed be t 
to disregard them, so, picking my way carefully 
along the sticky, mud-covered sidewalks, which 
were quite as bad, if not worse, than those in 
Boston, 1 at last reached Superior Street. One 
cannot help feeling that this street, and, in fact, 
all the streets, might look much more attractive 
under a blue skv and bright sunshine than when 
darkened by clouds of black smoke which hung 
over the whole city, giving it a London-like ap- 
pearance. 

It must be that this kind of weather is not un- 
common, for in a large dry-goods store (of course 
being a woman I had a "little shopping to do ") 
a lady said to the clerk who waited on her, " Now 
this piece of linen will wash well, and that 's the 
thing for Cleveland, you know." A little farther 
on I stopped to listen to a little boy who was say- 
ing, " O mother ! see that little hor-rse with a 
har r-ness on ! " One cannot help noticing the 
politeness with which the people treat each other 
and how very accommodating and interested they 
are. Perhaps it 's on account of their lack of New 
England reserve ; at any rate, it is refreshing. 

At last it was time to bring my exploring expe- 
dition to a close. (I have n't spoken of the pub- 
lic buildings, the common, etc., because you all 
know just how they would look.) I went into a 
druggist's to inquire which was the nearest way to 
the station. A nice-looking old gentleman came 
forward, and, in reply to my question, said, " The 
police station, do you mean ? " Of all things ! for 
a young woman who considers herself circumspect! 
but I saw mv mistake in a moment, and received 
full directions when I asked for the depot. 

By the way, I was taught to say station at 
Lasell, so still feel confident that it is correct. 
After a four hours' ride in a close, stuffy, and very 
much overheated car, an hour's waiting in that 
dreary station in Toledo (at least so it seemed at 



Las ell Leaves. 



6 9 



that midnight hour), another journey in a car 
equally hot and uncomfortable (why are Amer- 
icans so fond of being half roasted on a journey ?), 
I arrived at Fort Wayne, Ind., safe, but ready to 
spend an idle week in one of the pleasantest fam- 
ilies it has ever been my lot to visit. 



A ROMANCE OF FORT SAINT LOUIS. 

La Salle and his few surviving colonisls, after 
much wandering and countless hardships, crossed 
San Bernado Bay, sailed up the Lavaca River, 
and upon its banks erected Fort Saint Louis. 

The summer months were occupied in building 
houses and making all necessary preparations 
for their stay. Some corn was planted, but they 
had to be very sparing with it, as they were afraid 
it would give out. Things went on as well as 
could be expected. Their only fear was that the 
Indians might pounce upon them and put them 
to death, or that provisions might become short. 

Early on the morning of Nov. 11, La Salle 
sent his man-servant, Beaumont, to the homes 
of his little band, telling them that he would be 
compelled to go to the French settlements in 
Illinois to obtain food, that the supplies at the 
fort were nearly exhausted. 

Despair filled the minds of all ; the very 
thought of food being scarce, their leader gone, 
and the threatening Indians, seemed almost 
greater than they could bear. 

But the saddest heart throughout all that col- 
ony was that of the little maiden Jeanne Dubois, 
for she knew full well that if La Salle went, her 
beloved Beaumont would accompany him on his 
journey. 

La Salle bade them be of good cheer, saying he 
would return to them as soon as possible. He 
also told them how hopeful he was of the future ; 
how they would settle the new country, and claim 
it for France. If all went well, they would be 
able to return to France and see their friends and 
loved ones. 

All preparations were made for the journey. 
Barbier was left in charge of the fort. 

Beaumont was seen sauntering slowly clown the 
path which led to the home of his dear Jeanne, 
who was standing in the doorway waiting for his 



coming. There are scenes which it is better not 
to attempt to describe : they are so pathetic in 
themselves, that the one who reads the awkward 
descriptions almost invariably feels a strong im- 
pulse to "dilate with the wrong emotions." 
La Salle, too, felt a slight touch of regret on say- 
m o good-by lo Margaret Congrieve, but raised 
his hat, mounted his horse and rode away at the 
the head of his companions. 

In time the spirits of the colonists brightened ; 
they soon found it would not do for them to sit 
idle : their children and wives must be cared for 
and fed. They worked faithfully, trying in every 
way possible to improve their little fort and make 
it strong against the Indians The supply of 
bread was meagre, but in the dells they could 
hunt plenty of deer and baffalo. 

Barbier made them frequent calls, dropping 
here and there words of comfort ; more especially 
did he like to linger around the door of Dubois. 
For hours he would sit under the morning-glory 
vines and converse with Jeanne about her friends 
in France. Before very many of these visits were 
made, Barbier asked Jeanne to marry him. After 
the usual amouut of blushing, and a few words 
about her lover who had gone with La Salle, she 
said her yea. 

A few days afterward, one of the neighbors was 
heard to exclaim, "Glory! did you know that we 
were to have a wedding at the fort ? " And so 
the news spread around. Invitations were sent 
to all, — verbal ones, of course. In a week every- 
thing was in readiness. The day arrived, and the 
guests assembled. The ceremony was performed 
by Fater Fontenoy. It would scarcely be fair to 
tell what the bride wore, as they had had no fash- 
ions from Paris for some years. The party 
chatted gayly, asking about La Salle, and expressing 
a word of sympathy for poor Beaumout, when to 
their great consternation they heard the war-cry 
of the Indians. Frantically they rushed out of 
windows and doors, but they could not escape the 
Indians ; they were on all sides, their long 
feathers floating in the moonlight, and their 
tomahawks raised to heaven. One by one the 
settlers were murdered. In a flash, Barbier re- 
membered his horse (Texas mustang, I suppose), 
tied to the morning-glory vines. He told Jeanne 
to be ready, leaped out of the window, slipped 



yo 



Lasell Leaves. 



around easily and untied the animal, seized 
Jeanne in his arms and placed her on the horse, 
jumped to the saddle, and away they flew. 

All night they rode, on and on. Just at day- 
break, thinking they were entirely out of harm's 
way, I hey stopped to rest, almost dead with fa- 
tigue, and, becoming conscious of their situation, 
sat down in despair. But Barbier roused himself 
and endeavored to comfort Jeanne ; soon she was 
so overcome that she fell to sleep on the grass. 
Barbier began to think what they were going to 
do and where they would get any food. By this 
time the sun had risen and lent a beautiful light 
to the prairies. Allured by the bright flowers, 
sweet songs of the mocking-bird and the lark, 
and the fresh green grass, he wandered on a lit- 
tle. As he proceeded he could but feel thankful, 
and he expressed his thanks to the Father for 
their deliverance from the Indians. Much to his 
comfort and refreshment, he soon came upon a 
small stream of water. On the bank of the 
stream, near the water's edge, he spied some rich 
red berries. How nice they would be for 
Jeanne's breakfast, he thought ! Stooping down, 
he began to pick them, and in a short while gath- 
ered as many as four great leaves pinned to- 
gether for a basket would hold. 

Thinking that Jeanne might awake, and, finding 
him gone, become frightened, he retraced his steps. 
In a large shell which he found on the brink of 
the stream he carried her a drink of water. 

For many days they wandered on through the 
woods and over the prairies, berries for food and 
the green grass for a bed. Each day they went a 
little farther, hoping to find some means of help. 
And help did come at last ; they reached the gulf, 
were taken on board of a vessel, and sailed for 
France. Of course they now tell wonderful stories 
to their children of how they escaped being mur- 
dered by the Indians on their wedding day, and 
how all at Fort Saint Louis perished. L. 



A STUDY. 

Did it ever occur to you what an interesting 
character study might be made from the ships and 
small craft passed on a trip through Long Island 
Sound or across Boston Harbor ? There is a 
deal of human nature in each one, and it is an 



entertaining study to discover the resemblances to 
different people of our acquaintance. 

There is the ocean steamer, for instance, 
just starting on her long voyage. We may see 
in her the independent business man, coming and 
going over the dangerous seas of business life, 
often bearing the wealth and trust of many 
another. 

There is the stately ship, so strong and yet 
so strangely weak ; and the ferry-boats, — great, 
warm-hearted people, always busy in helping 
others in their joys or sorrows, in their work or 
play, and never too full, too busy for one mpre. 

The pleasure yachts, we know them, too, alas ! 
fair society people, who seldom or never do any- 
thing in the world but enjoy themselves ; they 
serve to amuse for a while, but when that is over 
their day is done. 

There are the race yachts also ; they serve 
as good examples of useless ambition and wasted 
strength. 

Then there are the inquisitive little cat-boats, 
skipping along, investigating everything with 
which they come in contact ; and there are the 
grain elevators, the dredges, the scows, and the 
fishing boats, — the working men of this work-a- 
day world. 

Then, too, we have the pilot-boats, put to guide 
us over dangerous waters ; and the life-boat, in 
time of great peril and danger. 

But of all, I think the little tugs are my favor- 
ites. We all know them, — busy, cheery, inde- 
pendent ; never in the way, yet always ready 
when needed, and always lending the helping hand. 

The study is as endless and varied as the num- 
ber of crafts that haunt the waters of our lakes, 
rivers, and seas, and as interesting ; try it for 
yourselves and see. M. B. 



POLITICAL NOTES. 



The Post-Office Department has modified the 
recent ruling, by which no writing or printing can 
be placed upon the outside of second, third, and 
fourth class mail matter, without subjecting it to 
letter rates of postage, in so far as to allow the 
word " merchandise " to be printed or written on 
the wrapper of fourth-class matter. 



Lasell Leaves. 



7i 



It is stated that England and France have con- 
sented to admit a Turkish delegate to the Suez 
Canal Neutrality Commission. 

DanieljManning, ex-Secretary of the Treasury, 
died at his son's house in Albany, New York, 
Dec. 24, aged fifty-six. As a politician he was 
one of Mr. Tilden's trusted lieutenants, and made 
a national reputation by securing the nomination 
of President Cleveland in the national convention. 

Charles Stuart Parnell's health is much 
improved, and he will resume the leadership of 
the Irish party this month. 



SCIENTIFIC NOTES. 



Mr. Edison's new phonograph seems to be the 
most interesting of recent inventions. The origi- 
nal phonograph was built just ten years ago, and 
was a very rude affair, only capable of reproducing 
loud sounds, and those very imperfectly. The 
new machine, which is the result of much labor 
and study, is claimed by Mr. Edison to be as 
practical and useful as the type-writer. It can, 
if the inventor is to be believed, be made for sixty 
dollars, and maintained for fifty cents per month. 
If all that is claimed be carried out, lectures can 
be delivered by express, and the voices of great 
singers preserved for generations. 

Within the last few weeks several trials of 
electric street cars have been made in Boston and 
Cambridge. Ordinary horse-cars are fitted with 
electric motors, attached by chain belts to the car 
axles. The electricity is derived from storage 
cells, placed under the car seats. The batteries 
are charged by dynamos at a central station, and 
contain power enough for a run of several hours 
without recharging. Similar systems of street-car 
working are practically employed in several West- 
ern cities, and they are found more economical 
than horse power. The chief difficulty to be met 
in Boston seems to be ice and mud on the tracks. 

The only railway extending into the Arctic 
zone runs north from the port of Lulea, in Sweden, 
at the head of the Gulf of Bothnia, toward the 
iron mines of the Gellivara Mountains. The first 
train to cross the Arctic Circle passed over this 
road a few weeks ago. 



ART NOTES. 

M. Bartholdi, whose name is as familiar in 
America as it is in France, has his studio in Paris, 
across the Seine, on a street running between the 
Latin Quarter and the Faubourg St. Germain. 
He is very busy working on portrait busts of 
several American gentlemen, and a fountain for 
Bordeaux. M. Bartholdi is an early riser, and 
after a cup of cafe au lait he goes to work. At 
one he breakfasts, and after that he devotes an 
hour to callers. He is very methodical, and is 
very prompt, as a man of business, in answering 
his letters. 

The first likeness ever successfully obtained in 
this country by the Daguerre process was taken 
by the late Prof. J. W. Draper, in the autumn of 
1839. His camera was a cigar box, in which was 
a spectacle lens. During the next winter a small 
gallery was opened and some notable pictures 
taken. Prof. Morse, who invented the telegraph, 
succeeded Prof. Draper the next winter, and from 
this small beginning the art of photography grew. 

Adolph Sutro, of tunnel fame, is to present a 
colossal statue of Liberty to the city of San Fran- 
cisco. The figure will be of stone, and, including 
the pedestal, will be forty feet high. The site for 
the statue is nine hundred and sixty feet high, so 
that the electric-light torch, which will be held 
aloft in its right hand, will be one thousand feet 
above sea level. 

Miss Anne Whitney, the sculptor, has won 
high praise for her bronze statue of Lief Erikson, 
recently unveiled in Boston. 

The Italian residents of Washington propose to 
present to the United States a marble bust of 
Garibaldi, as "a link in the chain of sympathy 
which all free men feel for the champions of 
liberty and republican government," if they can 
induce Congress to accept it. As Congress never 
refuses anything, the bust will soon be in place. 



MAJOR AND MINOR. 

A commemorative tablet has been "affixed, 
under the auspices of the German Male Quartet 
Society, of Prague, to the house in which Mozart 
resided on the occasion of his stay at the Bohe- 
mian capital, in 1787. 



72 



Lasell Leaves. 



The wonderful boy pianist, Josef Hofmann, has 
delighted New York and Boston. It is to be 
hoped that the Lasell girls may have the privilege 
of hearing this great genius. 

In 1361 a complete chromatic keyboard was 
first made by Nicholas Faber. Before this change, 
a separate keyboard for the incomplete black keys 
was used. 

The return of Mme. Etelka Gerster to America, 
which has been looked forward to with such 
pleasure by her many friends, has not brought 
with it the enjoyment that was anticipated. To 
the astonishment of all, she made a complete 
failure upon her first appearance, it being only 
with difficulty that she managed to get through 
her programme. She sang two nights, and then 
retired. In explanation of her loss of voice, her 
brother, Dr. Gerster, states that it is purely ner- 
vous affection which attacks her when upon the 
stage ; that her voice is still there, but it is need- 
less for her to attempt to sing until she can re- 
cover from her extreme nervousness. Meanwhile, 
Mme. Gerster has retired, and will remain under 
the charge of the physician. 

A system of scale fingering, in which the thumb 
was first brought into use, was employed by Em. 
Bach, in 1753. 

1-*-, 

TEMPERANCE. 

Only three hundred of the eight thousand per- 
sons in Philadelphia engaged in the liquor busi- 
ness are native Americans. This does not look 
as though the saloon was an American institution. 

By common consent, the white water lily has 
been adopted as the emblematic flower of the 
world's W. C. T. U. If there be any objection 
to this, we should be glad to know. 

The Woman's Christian Temperance Union 
now numbers over two hundred and fifty thousand 
of the truest and best women in the land, in its 
various societies. They are consecrated by the 
most solemn vows to the cause of temperance. 
On bended knees they have sworn eternal alle- 
giance to this cause of God and humanity. They 
are possessed of a kind of holy enthusiasm that 
knows no discouragement; they are not daunted 
by defeat, nor are they thwarted by opposition. 



EXCHANGES. 

It seems rather unkind of the Oberlin Review 
to devote so many of its admirably written pages 
to matter interesting only to those immediately 
interested in the college, thus depriving its outside 
readers of the excellent literary articles, of which 
we have had occasional samples. With Oliver 
Twist, we ask ' ; for more." 

The suggestion might be made that the next 
time Ibid of the Lampoon is moved to tears by the 
coldness with which his well-known affection for 
the Crimson is met, that he find some other 
means for drying his eyes than upon the Leaves. 
We don't like the idea of being damp. It sug- 
gests mould, and finally decay. 

The editorials of the Northwestern were very in- 
teresting and well written ; but one sentence 
rather amazed us, in which some one was spoken 
of as writing "with all the flowers of rhet- 
oric without a single thorn of thought." As thorns 
are generally supposed to be disagreea^e, and 
very undesirable, it would appear that the editor 
has a decided aversion to ideas. 

The article in the Current on College Oratory 
seems especially commendable. It is not only ex- 
tremely forcible, but in designating a too common 
fault made by budding geniuses, it does not neg- 
lect to suggest the remedy. 



CHRISTMAS AT LASELL. 

Christmas vacation at Lasell was very pleasant. 
We enjoyed every moment of the two weeks, and 
wished January the 5 th far, far away. Mr. 
Bragdon and Mr. Shepherd both outdid them- 
selves in providing amusement for us, and in this 
they were ably seconded by Miss Carpenter and 
Miss Chamberlayne. To all, our thanks. 

There was sleighing for a few days, and it was 
well improved. When there was no sleighing there 
was plenty of driving in the way of taking the horse 
to Watertown to be shod. One morning was spent 
very delightfully on board the " Pavonia." We 
went to see Booth and Barrett in " Othello." (We 
do not ask you to take our word for this. We 
have the proofs. Coupons cheerfully shown on 
Tuesdays and Fridays, from 9 to 930 p. M., at 
No. 24.) We attended a charming children's 



Lasell Leaves. 



n 



entertainment at Woodland Park Hotel. It was 
a cantata by the fairies, and the lovely dresses and 
colored lights made a very pretty scene. Monday 
morning, all were awakened, bright and early, by 
the music of Christmas serenaders, who rendered 
some fine carols, and, in departing, wished us " A 
Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year." We 
enjoyed it very much, and return our thanks to 
those who so kindly favored us, — Messrs. Fred 
Plummers, George Pickard, John McLeod, and 
George Royal Pulsifer. Thursday evening, a few 
friends were very informally entertained at a 
soap-bubble party. Mr. Sweet and Miss Couts 
carried off the first prizes, Mr. Liddell and Miss 
Fowler the second, and the booby prizes were 
awarded to Mr. Hall and Miss Phelps. So you 
see, with a lake walk Friday evening, and other in- 
formal but very enjoyable affairs, and still other 
festivities, about which " I could a tale unfold, 
whose lightest breath would harrow up thy soul," 
but refrain (those curiously inclined call on 
Junior occupant of No. 70), time has not hung 
heavy on our hands. Again we thank those who 
did so much to make our vacation a happy one. 

W. B. E 



LOCALS. 

Behold, there is something new under the sun ! 
A New Year ! May it be a bright and happy one 
for all. 

On Dec. 14 an enjoyable concert was given in 
the gymnasium by the Orphean Club, assisted by 
a chorus of male voices, and by Miss Edith Es- 
telle Torrey, Miss Jennie T. Brown, Prof. Hills, 
and Mr. Waldo W. Cole. 

What a dreadful mistake ! Who could have 
made it ? Miss H , Lasell Asylum, Auburn- 
dale. 

The storm prevented our attending church on 
Dec. 18. Services were held in the chapel. Prof. 
Bragdon read one of Canon Farrar's sermons, 
and the duet by Miss Hollingsworth and Miss 
Grace Richards was fully appreciated. 

"The god of fire? — I don't know exactly, — 
but — oh, yes, of course, — Satan." 

A very delightful evening was passed at the 
musicale, which took place in the gymnasium 
Dec. 19, under the direction of Prof. Davis and 



Prof. Hills. We were glad to welcome the old 
girls and to see so many new names on the pro- 
gramme, which was as follows : — 

PIANOFORTE. Bubbling Spring .... Rive-King. 

MISS LITTLEFIELD. 

SONG. Oil, day of bliss Gdtze. 

MISS G. RICHARDS. 

PIANOFORTE. Nocturne in E flat Chopin. 

MISS THRESHER. 

SONG. Winds at rest Hofmann. 

MISS PAGE. 

PIANOFORTE. Troika Mel. Var Tocluiikowsky. 

MISS HOLDEN. 

VOCAL DUET. Estudiantina Lacome. 

MISSES PEABODY AND McBRIER. 

CHORUS. Spanish Lullaby Operti. 

ORPHEAN CLUB. 



PIANOFORTE. Theme and Variations in B flat, Op. 142. Schubert. 

MISS GRAY. 

SONG. Dusk Cowen. 

MISS GIBBONS 

PIANOFORTE. Polka de Concert Bartlett. 

MISS LAW. 

SONG. Le Tortorelle Arditi. 

MISS HOLLINGSWORTH. 

PIANOFORTE. Home, Sweet Home . . . . Thaiberg. 

MISS SPARKS. 

SONG. La Capricciosa Rizzo. 

MISS BARBOUR. 

CHORUS. But tell me, Speak again (from "Ancient Mariner"), 

ORPHEAN CLUB. Burnett. 

One Monday afternoon this fall 

There came out to Lasell 
A visitor, — a Harvard man, — 

Whose name I shall not tell. 

He rang the bell, sent up his card, 
Then walked in through the hall, 

And sat him down to contemplate 
The pictures on the wall. 

Some forty minutes passed, and then 

A voice outside the door 
Was heard to say, in accents low, 

" Miss Roseleaf, here 's your boa." 



Men are so stupid. Anything 

They hear will make them wince ; 

'T was a mistake in toto, — yet 

He has n't called here since. J. A. F. 

Tuesday evening, Dec. 20, we listened to a very 
interesting lecture by Rev. Dr. Tiffany, of New- 
tonville, on St. Francis of Assisi. 

Santa Claus was unusually generous this year, 
bestowing sixteen bags on one girl. These arti- 
cles are on exhibition at Room 41. 



74 



Lasell Leaves. 



In the dining-room : — 
" What will you have ? " 
" Stew, please." 
" Potatoes, too ? " 

In the studio : — 

Six fingers on one hand. 

Heard in the German class : — 

Teacher {translating for pupif s benefit) . "He 
frees the serf." 

Pupil. " I might have known, — He froze the 
sea." 

Jan. 5, Miss Marion Talbot gave her fourth lec- 
ture on Sanitation. 

"We are seven," sing the new girls, — Rosa 
M. Best, Portland, Me. ; Forstina Curtis, Bar 
Harbor, Me.; Caraline Ebersole, Cincinnati, Ohio ; 
Edith Ellis, Newton Centre, Mass ; Gertrude 
Gove, Cambridgeport, Mass. ; Alice Jefferds, 
Worcester, Mass. ; Cora Dawes, Harrison, Me. 

The officers of the S. D. Society are as follows : 
President, Miss Lloyd ; Vice-President, Miss Van 
Horn ; Secretary, Miss Aston ; Treasurer, Miss 
Havens ; Critic, Miss Boyen ; Usher, Miss Grace 
Richards. 

Recent Elections of the Lasell Club. — 
President, Miss Binford ; Vice-President, Miss 
Hallock ; Secretary, Miss Crosby ; Treasurer, 
Miss Dudley ; Critic, Miss Reed ; Guard, Miss 
Marsh ; Assistant Guard, Miss Beach ; Executive 
Committee, Miss Gage, Miss Thomas, and Miss 
Oliver. 

" To be or not to be " — self-governed, that 
was the question, as we gathered in the chapel on 
that last morning before the holidays. But we 
were doomed to disappointment. The Faculty, 
out of the kindness of their hearts, had decided 
to postpone the reading of the lists until we re- 
turned ; and, "Why a kindness?" some will 
ask. We know, but we dare not tell the secret 
to the cruel world. 

Lasell is more firmly supported than ever. It 
has two posts. 

If it is necessary for you to be out of your 
room after 9.30 p. m., and you have boots that 
insist upon squeaking, don't be alarmed ; just take 
them off. We Ve seen it done. The plan is a 
good one. 



CARLTON PERKINS PATILLO. 

This is the name of the little son of Mr. and 
Mrs. A. Manton Patillo of Gloucester, Mass., 
who departed this life at the beginning of the new 
year. Mrs. Patillo was Miss N. Grace Perkins, 
who was graduated at Lasell Seminary in 1877. 
Several of the present Faculty remember her as a 
dear and faithful pupil, in all respects worthy of 
esteem and affection, and these teachers tenderly 
sympathize with her and with her husband, in this 
sad loss of their only child. Many, also, of her 
fellow-pupils and friends, learning her affliction, 
possibly through this notice, will mourn for and 
with her most sincerely. The child died of a 
tumor, which could not be removed, and from the 
first the case was pronounced incurable by the 
best medical authority, so that for six weeks pre- 
vious to his death these agonized parents knew 
that there was no hope. Though the dear little 
one, who was almost two years old, was playing 
about the floor, bright and active, they knew that 
he was dying. Grace writes to Prof. Bragdon in 
deepest grief, yet in a spirit of Christian fortitude. 
She could not endure it, only that she feels about 
her " the everlasting arms." Her wounded heart 
turns heavenward, where this treasure now is, and 
she and her husband find in Christ their only con- 
solation. 



PERSONALS. 

Many will remember little Katie Bragdon, who 
was here for a few weeks at the beginning of the 
fall term, a year ago. News of her sudden death 
at the beginning of the new year called Prof. 
Bragdon to her home in the West. 

We learn that Mary Hopkins, who was here in 
1878, has married Davis R. Dewey, Ph. D., of the 
Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and we 
presume lives in Boston. 

Mary Haskell has been for some weeks in 
New York and Washington. After the holidays 
she expects to visit for some time in Chicago. 

Tine Sanford and Annie White held an exhi- 
bition and sale of Christmas art work in the 
Home Bank Building, Brockton, Mass., from Dec. 
12 to Dec. 25. We regretted very much that we 
were prevented from attendance at any time, and 
hope to hear that it was a success. 



Lasell Leaves. 



75 



Mercy S. Sinsabaugh, '87, is studying 
Paris. 



Harrie Joy spent a few days with Grace 
Seiberling during the holidays, and is now visiting 
Sue Stearns, in Boston. 

Florence Bailey, '87, made us a short call at 
Christmas time. Come again, and make us a 
longer call next time. 

We were much pleased to see among us once 
more Cora and Mabel Cogswell. It is pleasant 
to have the old girls back, and we wish you would 
come oftener. Benjie is well. So is Ida. 

A glimpse was caught of Gertrude Rice, '81, 
on the train, showing that she has returned from 
Europe. 

Blanche Jones Haskell, Monmouth Place, 
Longwood, sends a bright response to the com- 
plaint of late news, telling us of the little Mar- 
garet, always perfectly well, — such a comfort. 
God bless the child ! 

Miss Jennie Coy, of Smith College, visited 
her sister at Lasell not long ago. 

Grace Garland Etherington sends "very 
best wishes for the old school, of which I have so 
many pleasant recollections." 

Helen Underwood writes cheerfully of her 
home and social life in Chicago; finds time "in the 
rush" there to try to keep up music and an art 
class. She has also taken a class in mission 
school work. 

Caroline Ebersole, '85, is with us again as a 
post graduate. Glad to see you. 

Miss Blanche Theodora Ford, '86, was mar- 
ried to Mr. Josiah French Hill, Dec. 28, 1887, at 
Concord, N. H. At home after Jan. 10, at 
Omaha, Nebraska. 

Cards are out for the marriage of Miss Anna 
Sara Baker to Mr. William T. Jebb, Tuesday 
evening, Jan. 17, 47 Niagara Street, Buffalo. 



art in 



Married. — At Clinton, N. J., Dec. 28, 1887, 
Miss Cora E. Mills and Mr. Charles D. Larrabee. 

We learn that Blanche Lowe, '87, has been with 
her father and mother in California, where Prof. 
Lowe has made large contracts in gas mines. 

We are pained to hear that Lizzie Pennell San- 
born, of State Street, Portland, Me., lost her hus- 
band by death during the holidays, in fact, upon 
the first day of the new year. Lizzie was a pupil 
of Lasell a few years ago, and is very affection- 
ately remembered. She is left with three children, 
only one her own, she having married a widower. 
We give her much sympathy in her sudden loss. 



SHREVE. CRUMP k LOW, 

432 WASHINGTON ST. 



BOSTON. 



\)(/ atche£, ^f) iamorids, 
(jewelry, 

Miriest (rettery . 



SPECIAL ATTENTION GIVEN TO DESIGNS IN 
GOLD AND SILVER FOR PRIZES, ETC. 





iT*S 



STEEL** PENS. 

THE FAVORITE NUMBERS, 303,404, 332,351, 170, 

AND HIS ©THEJ3 STYLES 

SOLD by ALL DEALERS throughout the WORLD. 




7 6 



Lasell Leaves. 



FRENCH 

SHIRTINGS. 



CheviQts, 

jVladraSj 

English & 

French 

Flannels 

& Silk 

Shirtings, 



Fnr Tennis, 

" Eailwap Gar, 

" Steamer Trav- 
" elling, 

" Hunting, 

" Pishing, 

" Yachting, 

Always in stock or 

made to special 

measure. 



NOYES BROS. 



Washington and Summer Sts. 



BOSTON, U. S. A, 



London Tan Street Gioves, warranted, at 
$1.35, at Noyes Bros. 

Dress Shirts, for Weddings, for Receptions, 
for Dinner Parties, with Collars, Cuffs, and 
Cravats, in the latest English styles. Plain 
French Bosoms, fine Embroidered Spots, 
Figures and Cords, at Noyes Bros. 

English Cheviots, English and French Flan- 
nels, Silk and Wool and Fnre Silk Shirt- 
ings, for Tennis, for Steamer Travelling, 
for Hunting'and Fishing, for Railway and 
Yachting. Always in stock or made to 
special measure, at Noyes Bros. 

English Mackintosh Coats, .for Ladies and 
Gentlemen, at Noyes Bros. 

English Bugs and Shawls, for Steamer and 
Railway use, at Noyes Bros. 

English Flannel, Blanket and Shawl Wraps, 

for the Sick-Room, for Steamer and Railway 
Travelling. For the bath and house use they 
are indispensable. $3.25 to $65.00. 

English Neckwear, at Noyes Bros. 



Underwear and Hosiery, in Pure Silk, Lambs' 
Wool, Merino, Balbriggan and English Cotton, 
for early fall wear, at Noyes Bros. 

English Flannel Pajamas, Long Flannel 
Night Shirts and Wraps, for steamer and rail- 
way travelling, at Noyes Bros. 



Full Evening Dress Shirts, 
Collars and Cravats 

Constantly on hand, for Dimier Parties, 
Weddings , or any occasion. 

The present English Fashion of shirts made 
with Linen Cords and Spot Bosoms may be 
had of Noyes Bros. 



ENGLISH DRESSING GOWNS, 

JACKETS AND WRAPS, 



Lawn Tennis Shirts, Coats and Hose. 



TENNIS BELTS AND CAFS in Stock and 
made to measure from choice styles of ENG- 
LISH FLANNELS. 

GLOVES of Every Description, for Dress, 
Street, Driving, and the famous London Tan, 
at $1.35, at Noyes Bros. 



JURORS' A WARD for beauty of work- 
manship and design, and distinguished 
excellence in the manufacture 
of Shirts, to 

NOYES BEOS. 

Washington and Summer Streets, 
BOSTON, U. S. A, 



ESTABLISHED 181V. 



JOHN H. PRAY, SONS & CO. 

Importers. Jobbers, Retailers and Manufacturers' Agents 

Carpetings, Mattings, Oil Cloth, 

ORIiEJXTJLL RUGS, 

CARPETS AND UPHOLSTERY. 



558 and 560 Washington St., 

30 to 34 Harrison Ave. Extension, 



BOSTON. 



113 Worth. Street 



NKW YORK. 



Lasell Leaves. 



77 



A. STOWELL & CO. 

24 Winter Street, Boston. 



£orrie of our Specialties : 

Bohemian Garnet Jewelry. 

Amber Beads and Ornaments. 

Tortoise-Shell Hair Pins. 

Choice Leather Goods. 

Oxidized Silver Jewelry. 

Fans for all occasions. 

Pearl Opera Glasses. 

Fine Gold Jewelry. 

Wedding Presents in Clocks, Vases and 
Bronzes. 

LATEST NOVELTIES IN ALL DEPARTMENTS. 
Lowest Prices. 



1 



YOUNG LADIES' 

BOOTS, SHOES AND SLIPPERS, 

Stylish and Durable at Moderate Prices. 

GYMNASIUM SHOES A SPECIALTY. 

Thayer, McNeil & Hodgkins, 

47 TEMPLE PL. - - BOSTON 

ARTHUR P. SCHMIDT & CO. 

IMPORTERS OF AND DEALERS IN 

FOREIGN AND AMERICAN 

Sheet Music. 

sole Agents lor Litolffs celebrated Edition of 
Classical and Modern Music. 

13 AND 15 WEST ST., BOSTON. 

Catalogues sent free on application. 



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BOSTON FOREIGN BOOK STORE, 

BOOKS IN ALL FOREIGN LANGUAGES, 

CARL SCHOENHOF, 

144 Tremont Street - - One Flight Up. 



C. B. Woods. 



H. J. Wood. 



E> 
CO 

o 



C. B. WOODS & CO. 



MANUFACTURBRS OK 



Fine Furniture, 

Upholstery, Draperies, Wood Mantels 
and Interior Finish. 

< ) F F I C E A N 1 > W A R E R OOMS, 

105 and 107 Chauncy Street, Boston. 



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5 



JOHN J. O'BRIEN, 

Picture Frames 

01 Every Description. Wholesale anil Retail. 

OH, JO FBAMES EEGILT. 

69 CORNHILL, BOSTON. 



ESTABLISHED IS-*0. 



Isaac Locke & Company, 

Produce Commission Merchants, 

And Dealers in 

FOREIGN and DOMESTIC FRUITS 

97, 99 and 101 Faneuil Hall Market, and Basement 18 South Side, 

BOSTON - - - MASS. 

4®" Telephone Connection. 



78 



Lasell Leaves. 



^WEBER'S 



25, 27 TEMPLE PLACE 



BOSTON, 



AUNTID 33 WEST STREET, 

Ladies' and Gents' Restaurant, 

Oysters and Salads a Specialty. 

OPEN AFTER THEATRES. 

Caterer for Wedding Breakfasts, Lunches, Dinner and Evening Parties 

and Receptions. Also, Club Suppers at Short Notice 

and Reasonable Prices. 

S. W. BAILEY, 

— DEALER IN — 

WATCHES, JEWELRY, SILVERWARE, ETC. 

353 Washington Street, Boston. 

Jewelry Neatly Repaired. Also, Monograms on Coin Pieces. Personal 
Attention given to Repairing Fine Watches. 

ESTABLISHED 1847- 



AARON R. GAY & CO. 

TSTo. 122 State Street, Boston, 

STATIONERS 

AND 

BLANK BOOK MANUFACTURERS, 



First-Class Account Books of any desired 
pattern made to order. 

S. S. GAY. EDWIN W. GAY. 

JUST WHAT HAS BEEN WANTED, 

A LADIES' LUNCH ROOM 

HAS BEEN OPENED AT 

23 AVON STREET, BOSTON. 

A quiet, neat place, where a nice Lunch can be had at a very reason- 
able price. All the ladies say, " Is n't it nice ? " 

T. D. COOK, Caterer. 



ALSO, 

1 o 

Served with the Choicest Viands, and by Competent Waiters. 



"Wedding and other Parties 



SU PERIOR IC 



CREAM 



DELIVERED AT REASONABLE PRICES. 



*r~ 



THE 



-■¥ 



YOUTH'S COMPANION, 

A WEEKLY PAPER FOR 

YOUNG PEOPLE and the FAMILY, 

It aims to be a favorite in every family — looked for eagerly 
by the young folks, and read with interest by the older. Its purpose is to 
interest while it amuses; to be judicious, practical, sensible, and to have 
really permanent worth, while it attracts for the hour. 

It is liandsomely illustrated, ar.d has for contributors some of 
the most attractive writers in the country. 

Subscription Price, SI. 75. Specimen copies sent free. Please 
mention in what paper you read this advertisement. 

PERRY MASON &. CO. 

41 TEMPLE PLACE, BOSTON, MASS. 



FINE FURS. 

The best quality of all kijids of Furs in popular use. 

Seal English Jackets, 

Seal Dolman Wraps. 

Seal Sacques. 

We give particular attention to orders by measure, and using the 
richest and most durable of genuine Alaska Seals, assure the fullest 
satisfaction in quality and fit. 

The fashionable 

BLACK BEAR BOAS, 

of exquisite fineness and beauty, made from skins of rare quality. 

Fur Collars, Capes, Cuffs, Boas, 

Hats, Sleighing Hoods and Gloves, 

FUR TRIMMINGS. 

Gentlemen's Fur-lined Overcoats. 

Fur Mats and Carriage Robes. 

Joseph A. Jackson, 

412 Washington Street - - Boston. 

Established 1H25. 

NATHAN NEAT & CO. 

MANUFACTURERS OF 





BASKET TRUNKS AND STEAMER CHAIRS. 
Stateroom and Light-Weight Trunks for European Travel. 



SEND FOR ILLUSTRATED CATALOGUE. 

556 WASHINGTON ST., BOSTON, MASS. 

ELlGAlT FURNITURE 

At Popular Prices. 



F. M. HOLMES FURNITURE CO., 

116 TREMONT ST., BOSTON, MASS. 



LEVI S. GOULD. 



FRANK A. PATCH. 



Lasell Leaves. 



79 



EDWIN C. BURT & CO.'S 

FINE SHOES AND SLIPPERS 

FOR LADIES AND CHILDREN 

ARE THE BEST SHOES MADE. 



Fit Perfectly. 
Easy on the Feet. 
Superior in Style^ 



Cost no More 

Than any Other 

Fine Shoes. 



For sale by leading retail shoe dealers in nearly every city throughout the United States and 
Canada. All -widths of Lasts, any style of Shoe, Sole, Toe, or Heel. If you cannot 
get our make of shoes from your dealers, send address for directions how to procure them. 

EDWIN C. BURT & CO., Manufacturers, 

IsTEW TOUK. 

SPECIAL AGENTS IN BOSTON, 

JORDAN, MARSH & CO., WASHINGTON ST. 




Mr. JOSEPH A. HILLS 

has removed to more commo- 
dious musie rooms in 

HOTEL PELHAM, 
Cor. Tremont and Boylston Sts., 

BOSTON, MASS., 

where he will he pleased to meet 
his pupils and others for pro- 
fessional engagements. 

Competent assistants under Mr. 
Hills' s supervision will attend to 
the instruction of those less ad- 
vanced who may desire lessons 
at reduced rates. 



Conductors, Concert, Opera and 
Church Singers, Pianists, Organ- 
ists, Accompanists and Teachers 
supplied at the 

MUSIC TEACHERS' BUREAU, 

HOTEL PELHAM, 

BOSTON, MASS. 



CONOVER BROTHERS' CO. 
piai)ofort:^/T\aQufy 

14th St. and 9th Ave., New York. 

Clear, silvery, even tone through- 
out. Durable and elegant design. 
Indorsed by the profession. 

BOSTON WAREROOMS, 

Hotel Pelham. 



THE "PEERLESS" FOUNTAIN PEN 




IS THE PERFECTION OF FOUNTAIN PENS. 

Is a hard rubber holder fitted with a 16 k. gold pen of the best manufacture, and will never wear out. It will write ten thousand words with one 
filling of ink, and for taking lectures, etc., it is indispensable. There is no loss of time in dipping ink as with the ordinary pen, as the " Peerless " 
has a perfect, even and uninterrupted flow of ink, and is the best fountain pen manufactured. Price, SS2.00. 

The Cross Stylographic Pen, Stylographic Ink. All styles of Stylographic, Fountain, and Gold Pens repaired. 



THE CROSS PEN CO., 306 Washington St. 



BOSTON, MASS. 



2/rSSeS 33003=3, TO OLD SOTTTH CUTTBOK. 



8o 



Lasell Leaves. 



C. H. CODMAN & CO. 

Photographic Material, 

PICTURE and FRAME DEALERS' 

<A SUPPLIES > 
Wholesale and Retail Framing 

AMATEUR PHOTOGRAPHIC APPARATUS. 

34 BROMFIELD STREET, 

BOSTON - - - MASS. 

W. H. FRENCH & CO. 

PLUMBERS, GAS FITTERS, 



AND ■ 



SANITARY ENGINEERS, 

JUDSON'S BUILDING, OPP. RAILROAD STATION, 

WEST NEWTON. 



All Work Promptly Attended to and Warranted Satisfactory, 



LIVERY, HACK, 



■-AJSTD- 



BOARDING STABLE. 

ESTABLISHED 1861. 

S. F. CATE, WEST NEWTON. 



Barge "City of Newton." 

Boat Sleigh "Snow Bird." 

H. H. NEWELL, 

DEALER IN 

BOOTS, SHOES S RUBBERS. 

Auburn Street, Auburndale, Mass. 



ZION'S HERALD. 

A "Weekly Keligions Journal, 

The Oldest Methodist Paper in the World. 

Rev. B. K. PE RCE, D. D., Editor. 



It has more than two hundred contributors. All departments well 
organized and furnishing interesting reading matter for all classes, having 
Religious, Secular, Domestic and Foreign Intelligence, also an Agricul- 
tural Department, second to no paper of its class. 

For Business Men, it is one cf the Best Advertising Mediums. 

Read by probably 50,000 people weekly in New England. Address, 



HLONZO S. M99D, PUBLISHGR, 
36 BROMFIELD ST., BOSTON, MASS. 

House and Sign. Painters, Griazing, G-raining, 

Kalsornining and TVhitening. 

Paints, Oils and. Varnishes constantly on hand. 

WASHINGTON ST. (near R. R. Crossing), WEST NEWTON. 

C. T. Allen. D. Barry. 

EL. EC. HUNT, 

CARPENTER AND BUILDER, 

WEST NEWTON, 
Shop near E, R. Crossing, 



MASS. 

P. 0. Box 235. 



WARD ft Pfl CARRIAGE AND WAGON BUILDERS, 
lY nil!) O. UU., Cor. Elm and Washington Sta., near City Hall, 

WEST IT El -W T O 3ST . 
Fine Carriages and Wagons of any description built to order and War- 
ranted to give satisfaction. Carriage Painting and Repairing in all its 
branches promptly and thoroughly executed at fair prices. The Repair- 
ing of Fine Carriages a Specialty. 

Carriages Sent for and Returned Free of Charge. 

Boston Gossamer Rubber Co. 



MANUFACTURERS OF 

Gossamer Clothing. 

LEATHER COATS AND VESTS, 

HOOP-SKIRTS AND BUSTLES. 

611 Washington St., Boston, Mass. 

S. KLOUS, Treasurer. 

B. G. BAKER, 

COAL AND WOOD, 

Auburndale and West Newton, 



Lasell Leaves. 




THOMAS HALL, 

Electrician 



•AND- 



Optician. 



Manufacturer and Importer of 

Telegraphic, Electric, Mag- 
netic, fclalvanic, Optieal 
and Meteorological 
Instruments. 

Chemicals, Chemical and Philo- 
Bophical Apparatus of all Descrip- 
tions. Illustrated Catalogue of 
each Departmeu t. 

Hall's Pat. Medical Batteries. 
19 BROMFIELD ST., BOSTON, MASS. 

1835, D&niol Saris, Jr. 1849, Palmer & Hall. 1356, Thomas Hall. 
WADSWORTH & PICKERING, 

COMMISSION MERCHANTS, AND JOBBERS IN 

BUTTER, CHEESE, EGGS, ETC. 

STALL, 89 QUINCY MARKET, BOSTON. 

Briggs Wadsworth. F. A. Pickering. 

CHARLES H. WHITING, Formerly Hall & Whiting, 

STATIONER and BLANK BOOK MANUFACTURER 

Importer and Jobber. Publisher and Book Seller. School and Miscel- 
laneous Books. Crane's Fine Stationery. American, English, French 
and German Fancy and Staple Stationery. Weston's Ledger Papers. 

163 and 170 Devonshire Street, Eoston. 



FROST & ADAMS, 

Importers of, and Wholesale and Retail Dealers la 

ARTISTS' MATERIALS, 

DECORATIVE ART NOVELTIES, ART 
POTTERY, ETC. 



Ebonized Panels. 

Winsor & Newton's Colors. 

German Colors. 

French Colors. 

Tucker & Green's Colors. 

Sketch Blocks. 

Plaques of all kinds. 

China Colors. 

Mirrors for Decorating. 

Artists' Boxes. 

Artists' Brushes. 

Artists' Canvas. 

Handbooks on Art. 

Studies of all kinds. 

Lustra Painting Materials. 



Water-Colors. 

Bronzes. 

Brocades. 

Spangles. 

China for Decorating. 

Paper Panels. 

Tambourines. 

Repousse Materials. 

Canvas Stretched. 

Drawing Instruments. 

Plaque Rims. 

Artists' Easels. 

Drawing Paper. 

Materials for Tapestry, etc. 

Kensington Painting Materials. 



SCHOOLS & STUDENTS SUPPLIED 

AT LOW FIGURES. 

37 CORNHILL - - BOSTON. 

SEND FOR A CATALOGUE. 
F. S. Frost. H. A. Lawrencb. 



ELLIOT W. KEYES, 

APOTHECARY, 



Haskins' Block 

auburndali 



Auburn Street, 

MASS. 



FALL AND WINTER MILLINERY. 

MRS. M. H. KIMBALL, 

Dealer in FRENCH FLOWERS, HATS, BONNETS and TRIMMINGS, 

MELROSE STREET, AUBURNDALE. 

v. a^ plUtaT 

Dealer in PROVISIONS, 

Cor. Auburn and Lexington Streets. 
ALFRED BRUSH, 

APOTHECARY, 

Plummer's Block, Cor. of Auburn and Lexington Sts. 

auburndale. 

n. w. farley. g. d. harvey. a. c. farley. 

FARLEY, HARVEY & CO. 

Importers and Jobbers of 

H)^B"3T * G-OODS. 

61 and 67 Channeey, 39, 41 and 43 Bedford Sts., BOSTON. 

FARNUM &. COMPANY, 
PRODUCE COMMISSION MERCHANTS, 

Wholesale Dealers in Apples, Potatoes, Cranberries, Onions, Peas, 
Beans, Dried Apples, Oranges and Lemons. 

Nos. 108 and no Faneuil Hall Market - - BOSTON. 

Henry Farnum. W. W. Lawrence. 



GEORGE E. JOHNSON, 



■DEALER in- 



Hay, Grain and Feed, 

Lexington Street, 
auburndale, mass. 

CHARLES G. TINKHAM, 

Livery, Had anil Boarflii Silt 

Cor. of Lexington and Severn Sts., 
AUBURNDALE. 

JOHNSTON & KEYES, 

AUBURNDALE AND BOSTON EXPRESS, 



BOSTON OFFICES, 

105 Arch. Street, 
34 Court Square. 



AUBURNDALE OFFICE, 

Lexington Street, 
Near the Depot 



H. EUGENE FLEMING, PH. G. 

PHARMACIST, 

FINE CONFECTIONERY a Specialty. 

Near City Hall - . West Newton, Mass. 



FEBRUARY, 1888. 




L/^ecc lEfwfqs 



VOLUME XIII. -No. 5. 



CONTENTS. 



Editorials 83 

Pension Life in Paris 85 

Mr. Browning vs. Mrs. Browning as Poets . . .86 

Extracts from a Diary 89 

To Washington and Europe Again . . . .90 

Sanitary Lectures 90 

Books Added . 90 

Political Note* 90 



Scientific Notes 91 

Art Notes 91 

Major and Minor 93 

Temperance 9c 

Exchanges 9a 

Locals 92 

Personals 94 



Lasell Leaves. 



NOVELTIES 



OUR SPECIAL-TIES. 



•IN- 



MILLINERY 



RECEIVED DAILY FROM PARIS and LONDON, 



Ladies are invited to call and examine before purchasing 
elsewhere. Correct Styles. Popular pricet. 



HENRY M. BURR & CO. 



490 Washington Street, 



BOSTON. 



AMERICAN WATCHES, 

DIAMONDS, 

Sterling Silver Ware, French Clocks and Bronzes, Floe 
Plated Ware, Jewelry and Fancy Goods. 

Designs and estimates for class rings, pins and badges furnished 
without charge. 



N. G. WOOD & SON. 

444 Washington Street, Boston. 

LAWRENCE, WILDE & CO. 

Manufacturers of First-Class 

FURNITURE 



AND 



INTERIOR DECORATIONS, 

Nos, 38 to 48 CornMll - - Boston, 



A. Lawrence. 
Wm. H. Hull. 



Geo. B. Dabbow. 

F. 0. WlLDB. 



ESTABLISHED 1830. 



ALFRED MUDGE & SON, 

PRINTERS, 

No. 24 FRANKLIN STREET, BOSTON, MASS. 

HAVE UNSURPASSED FACILITIES FOR 

B,X>K AND MISCELLANEOUS PRINTING, 

ELECTROTYPING AND STEREOTYPING, 

MERCANTILE AND COMMERCIAL PRINTING, 

FANCY BALL AND SOCIETY PRINTING. 



LAW WORK A SPECIALTY. 

A FULL LINE OF WEDDING STATIONERY ENGRAVED OR PRINTED. 

"WEDDING OUTFITS executed in the finest manner at reasonable prices. 

Information regarding work in any department will at all times be promptly furnished, either 
personally or by correspondence. 

ALFRED MUDGE & SON, 24 FRANKLIN STREET, 



Las ell Leaves. 



81 



C. D. COBB & BROS. 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 

GROCERIES 

Of the Very Finest Quality, 

And IMPORTERS of 

^eFANCY GRIDES TEASb- 

Every Article Warranted. 



Orders of $20 and upwards Delivered at any 
point within lOO miles of Boston. 



FOR PARTICULARS, SEND FOR CATALOGUE TO 

C. D. Cobb & Bros. 

722 to 732 Washington Street, 
BOSTON - - - MASS. 



T. E. MOSELEY & CO. 



DEALERS IN 



BOOTS, SHOES, RUBBERS, ETC. 

FOR LADIES, GENTLEMEN, BOYS, 
MISSES AND CHILDREN. 

A Large Assortment for 

YOUNG LHDIES. 



GYMNASIUM SHOES 

In Great Variety 

ENGLISH LAST WALKING BOOTS, 

In CALF or GOAT, 
Are SENSIBLE, DURABLE, and REASONABLE in Price. 



COBB, BATES & YERXA, 

IMROR TJSR8 



AND 



T. E. MOSELEY & CO. 

469 Washington Street, 

BOSTON. 



GROCERS. 



Twenty-dollar orders delivered free at any station 
within 50 miles of Boston, and fifty-dollar orders at 
any station in New England, at our regular retail prices. 



COBB, BATES k YERXA, 

680 to 692 Washington Street, 
3 Bowdoin Square, 

6 and 8 Faneu.il Hail Squari 



Also in 



CHELSEA, FALL EIVER and TAUNTON. 



GOOD MUSIC FOR ALL THE YEAR ROUND. 



Is found in such books as the following, which, when kept at hand, fur- 
nish unfailing entertainment for the player or singer. 

Song Classics for Low Voices. 

(one dollar.) 
About 50 Gems of Sorig by the best modern composers; Rubinstein, 
Lassen, Grieg, Gounod and others. A true treasure for Alto, Baritone 
and Bass yoices. 

SOISTG- CLASSICS. 

(ONE DOLLAR.) 

For voices of average compass. All selected from the best sources. 
PIANO CLASSICS. 

(ONE DOLLAR.) 

An admirable collection of pieces in the best taste, by some of the best 
living composers. 

YOTJISr Gr PEOPLE'S CLASSICS. 

(ONE DOLLAR.) 

Easy pieces that will please all, young or old. 

The G-ood Old. Sonss We XJsed to Sing. 

($1.00 paper; $1.25 BDS.1 
A grand good new book, which will be received with open arms in 
every household. About 120 songs, with piano or organ accompaniment. 
Each one has been a distinguished success. Many are new to the pres- 
ent generation. Mailed for Retail Price. 

OLIVER DITSON & CO.. BOSTON. 



GEO. E. ALLEN, 

12 Winter Street ... - Boston. 

BUTTONS. LACES. YARNS, CORSETS, 



AND FANCY GOODS. 



Y 



OUNG'S HOTEL, 



EUROPEAN PLAN. 

OPPOSITE THE HEAD OF STATE STREET, BOSTON. 

Ladies' entrance, Court Street, near Washington Street. 

J. R. WHIPPLE, PROPRIETOR- 



82 



Lasell Leaves. 



HASTINGS 



\—i 



Qhe (^hotographer. 



fflc offer fo Irje (glFaeluafirjq and Llrjdep 
©lasses, and also f© irjcir- rjurnerous pierjds, 
unusual advarjfaqes, boll) Jop excellence o| 

PHOTOGRAPHIC WORK 

arjd reasonable prices. we quararjlee Irje 

rnosf e/lrfisiic lferoaucfiorjs rrjadc. 



No. 147 Tremont Street 

corner of West Street, 



BOSTON 



MASS. 



LADIES' FINE FOOTWEAR. 



We have added for Fall and Winter, many new lines, including 
specialties of which we have exclusive control. 



GYMNASIUM SHOES, 
WEDDING AND PARTY 
BOOTS AND SLIPPERS. 



HENRY H. TUTTLE & CO. 

435 Washington Street, 
BOSTON. 




THE CLASS 






PHOTOGRAPHER 



£>_i A»o-> 



W<" 



^\/^ 



For Lasell Seminary, 



hi- '88* 



Studio, 22 Winter Street, 



BOSTON. 



LASELL LEAVES. 



DUX FEMINA FACTI." 



Volume XIII. LASELL SEMINARY, AUBUpDALE, MASS,, FEBRUARY, 1 



dumber 5. 



LASELL LEAVES. 



Pztblished Monthly, /hiring the School Year, 



Lasell Publishing Association 



OF 



LASELL SEMINARY FOR YOUNG WOMEN, 



Auburndale, Mass. 



Edito r-in - Ch ief. 
MARY LOUISE COLE, '88. 

Local Editor. 
ELIZABETH M. CAMPBELL. 



Political Editor. 
GRACE C. HUNTINGTON, '89. 

Scientific Editor. 
JULIA L. COY. 

Musical Editor. 
MAUDE OLIVER, '89. 



A rt Editor. 
GRACE W. SKINNER. 

Exchange Editor. 
HELEN R. GILBERT, '8 9 . 

Business Ma nager. 

A. L1NA JONES, '88. 



Subscription Agent. 
ANNETTE V. McDONALD. 



TERMS, IN ADVANCE. 

One Copy, one year (including postage) . '. $1.00 
Single Numbers 15 cts. 

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Press of Alfred A fudge &° Son, 24 Franklin St., Boston. 



The talks on the Day of Prayer did not have 
the school motto for a text, as is said to be invaria- 
bly the case in some of the schools for "Young 
Women " in this vicinity ; nor was the woman 
question dwelt upon in any of its multitudinous 
forms, although Martha, Hannah, Dorcas, and the 
women in Proverbs furnish texts which, to many 
speakers before such an audience, seem to be ir- 
resistible. We had simply a scholarly discussion 
of practical ethics, embracing the three great fun- 
damental principles. The speakers did not limit 
themselves merely to the local aspect of the case ; 
the fact that we were citizens of a school did not 
cause them to forget for a moment that we were 
first of all citizens of the world. 

But may we not with profit follow the argument 
into some of its side issues and discuss for a time 
some of the questions connected with school 
ethics which no one but a student is likely to bear 
in mind ? 

It is always a difficult thing to define where duty 
to self should cease and that to others begin ; in 
fact, these duties are so minutely interwoven that 
finally they become merged in one. Especially 
is it hard in school to preserve anything like the 
right distinction, in spite of the fact that from all 
sides we are told that life in school is much less 
complex than out. We hear an inspiring talk on 
the natural self-centredness of student life, and 
straightway our impulses bring about a wide re- 
action in the other direction. 

In our wish to be helpful and pleasing to those 
about us, we become so over-zealous that we 
neglect ourselves, and shortly they get to exact 
from us attentions which are theirs only by right 
of courtesy. This is often the case with those 
intimately connected : one, whether consciously or 
unconsciously, over-runs the other. In the latter 
instance the effect on the character is even more 
disastrous than in the former, and it is hard to 



8 4 



Lasell Leaves. 



tell which has the worst time, the server or the 
served. When a person finds a machine to do 
what heretofore has been manual labor, he is more 
than apt to use the machine ; so we find that we 
can make use of somebody in many ways, and the 
helping and receiving become so mechanical as 
to lose much of its intended effect. 

Thus it is that the few and not the many bear 
the brunt of the burden. In clubs and societies 
of all kinds the same few are always the leaders, 
and the other members become wholly dependent 
upon them. These same leaders are often con- 
sidered bold by those to whom they would will- 
ingly surrender a part of their responsibility. 

It is at least reassuring when one feels inclined 
not to be subservient, to think that the assertion 
of one's own rights is really for the good of the 
other, even though he may not feel that proper 
respect is shown to him. 

Sometimes, too, in our young desire to reform 
the world, we condemn or praise without dis- 
crimination. We see things in strong blacks and 
whites ; the griffin's claws are either three feet long, 
or else he has n't any. Nor is it easy for anyone 
to distinguish between right and wrong, for often 
" one vice is only another virtue carried to 
excess." Stinginess is defined as " inordinate 
frugality," laziness as " a kind of immoderate good- 
nature." 

Of course there is no necessity of training one's 
self so that one will never appreciate what is 
really commendable, for a cold non-appreciation 
spirit tending towards wilful disregard is detesta- 
ble. It is not well to cultivate a practice of too 
much praising, but the almost brutal frankness 
which is promoted by the conscience, or lack of 
conscience, is a fearful blow to the young aspirant. 

Some old ideas about '' when you have anything 
to say, say it," and never "beat about the bush," 
are all very well in their place, remembering that 
their place is not that of '* extinguisher in general," 
to little flames which are trying to burn amid 
many draugh's and east winds. A good motto 
for a guide when trying to decide some of these 
perplexing questions is that of Wordsworth : — 

" Look up and not down, 
Look out and not in, 
Look forward and not back, 
And lend a hand." 



We now address you in our nat've language, 
but it will not be long, at the rate in which things 
are progressing, before we can favor you with an 
extract in the new artificial language, Volapiik, 
the would-be language of the world. 

Not only will our fellow-citizens feel more 
interest in the reading of something new, in mode 
of expression, if not in substance, but there will 
be opened to all a large field of literature which 
has hitherto been accessible but to a small portion 
of the great multitude of mankind. 

Then the foreigner can express his thoughts in' 
words which will be comprehended from pole to 
pole. Those serving as interpreters must seek 
another calling ; and as for French and German, 
what need to study them? The FrauUens and 
Madames will be succeeded by a volapukatidel, 
who will teach us to say dunonob, dunonol, duno- 
nom, for I do, you do, he does. 

This is said to be an easy language to learn, 
for the roots are nearly all taken from nouns, and 
from the English, Latin, German, and French. 

What a relief will come to the editor, when, in 
place of pondering and puzzling for, well an in- 
definite time, in search of some new mode for 
conveying the same old thought, he can resort to 
Volaptik, and when adjectives give out find 
variety in the gudik and gletik ! 

This is not meant to be a national language, 
but a language common to all nations, without ex- 
cluding the mother tongue ; but perhaps it will 
prove so musical, and especially so easy, to this 
labor-saving generation that it will be universally 
accepted. 

How dreadful would be the contemplation of 
another. Babel, should this prove to be the case ! 
More terrible still is the thought of the masses of 
slang that the c jmbined languages of the world 
can furnish if they bend all their energies to the 
effort. But all these disadvantages will be more 
than offset by the joy of those Freshmen who now 
recite il Du bist wie eine flower?" -'Jene sais the 
rest," but who will then find themselves finished 
students of the Volapiik language. 



What peaceful hours we once enjoyed, 
How sweet their memory still, — 

Those happy days when doors were shut 
And opened at our will. 



Lasell Leaves. 



85 



PENSION LIFE IN PARIS. 

We two Lasellians, who gave you in the October 
number some little account of our visit to Venice, 
make our bow again to our kind audience, and 
propose to tell you something of our life in Paris, 
hoping you will have as much pleasure in the 
reading as we shall in the telling. It is not 
through any attempt at a description of the 
wonders of that far-famed city upon which we 
shall venture this time, — that we leave to other and 
cleverer pens than ours, — but merely a few trifles 
" light as air," which yet are characteristic, and 
so, we hope, not without an interest all their 
own. 

A foreign " Pension,' 1 to begin with, is simply a 
boarding-house, nothing more, nothing less, and 
this particular one of which we write was situated 
in a very pleasant quarter of Paris, near the Rond 
Point des Champs Elysees, in the midst of many 
attractions. It was presided over by Madame, a 
gentle, dignified lady, with gray hair in soft puffs 
under her pretty lace cap, and Mademoiselle, good- 
humored, plump, and active, the business manager 
of the establishment. Other important personages 
were Jacques, a waiter, a solemn, ministerial 
looking individual ; and Eugenie, our light footed, 
fair-haired maid, whose clear, graceful French it 
was a pleasure to hear. Every morning, with a 
gentle tap at the door, Eugenie would bring into 
our room the petit dejciiner, consisting simply of 
chocolate, rolls, and butter, but all delicious, 
the rolls crisp and fresh, not hot, and the butter 
dainty and delightful in tiny twists, like delicately 
curled bits of shaving. How we enjoyed this 
simple meal, resting luxuriously in our easy-chairs, 
and " toasting our toes " at our cosey grate fire ! 

The second breakfast came at noon, and was 
quite substantial, with two courses of meat, one 
vegetable, cheese, and claret and seltzer for ac- 
companiment, for the Parisians have an unconquer- 
able dislike for pure water. But the six-o'clock 
dinner was the great affair of the day, always in 
six regular courses, including a salad, crisp and 
cool, and never concluding without the final 
course of cheese, and for the older people strong- 
coffee, with a dash of Cognac. There was, though, 
a certain simplicity, and even monotony, about the 
table, which we did not like at first, notwith- 



standing that everything was admirably cooked in 
French style ; we missed the sweet, rich dishes 
with which American tables are loaded, to the 
detriment, it must be confessed, of American 
digestions. Imagine a whole winter without a 
glimpse of cake, pie, or preserves. But they 
never appeared Did you ever read in Mark 
Twain's " Tramp Abroad " the long list of delica- 
cies indigenous to America, upon which he in- 
tended to feast as soon as he reached his dear 
native land again ? Well, without actually mak- 
ing out any list, we dimly felt that there was some- 
where in our being an aching void, which refused 
to be filled by soups, though never so skilfully 
concocted, or salads, though dressed by a 
cordon o/eu, or cheese, no matter how delightfully 
foreign its name and aspect. Think of it, good 
Americans ! No oysters, no sweet potatoes, no 
cranbeiry sauce, no pumpkin pies, and no brown 
bread and beans. Indeed, I could give quite an 
alarming list of " wants " ; these are not half. 

We soon became entirely accustomed to our 
French fare, however, and, so wonderful is force 
of habit, we even grew to prefer it. It was some 
time after my return before I could look with 
equanimity upon a great, substantial # slice of cold 
and clammy bread spread with hard, yellow, salty 
butter, such as we have upon American tables, 
and our generous tumblers of ice-water seemed 
to me long afterward an abominable and unhealth- 
ful accompaniment to any meal ; while as to our 
fashion of piling meat and vegetables indiscrim- 
inately together upon one plate, with a confused 
disregard for differences of flavor, I grew to 
wonder how we could be so barbarous as to toler- 
ate it. But wonderful force of habit again : I 
now drink my ice-water and pile up my plate with 
calm serenity, as becomes a good American, con- 
scious of being part and parcel of the "greatest 
nation on earth." 

At table there was usually a deafening clamor 
of voices, for all talked at onc(}, French fashion ; 
but do not think there was any rudeness or lack 
of breeding in this. It was remarked, in an ex- 
cellent lecture on " French Manners," given here 
in New York the other day, " When the various 
members of a French company all talk at the 
same time, it is with a desire to contribute to th„* 
general amusement, not to impress on others their 



86 



Lasell Leaves. 



own wisdom," which sentiment I heartily indorse 
from my own experience. Our society was ex- 
tremely varied, and many nations were represented 
at Madame's hospitable board. There was an 
" American " doctor, so called by her, but who 
turned out to be a Spaniard from Cuba, speaking 
not a word of English ; an American dentist, 
whose two pretty little motherless girls, placed in 
a French boarding-school, had quite forgotten 
their native tongue ; and an invalid American lady, 
who had been twenty years abroad, and whose 
dear little grandson, born in France, had a small 
copy of the Stars and Stripes to play with, but 
whose English sounded like some old-fashioned 
book, so prim and proper it was. Then there was 
a stout Danish demoiselle of a certain age, who 
smoked cigars with the gentlemen after dinner, a 
fascinating young Russian widow, and a pretty 
Bulgarian actress, with bewitching dark eyes, who 
appeared every evening in a new and resplendent 
toilet. I must not forget to mention the Princess 
from Vienna, a dark, thin, and by no means pretty 
young woman. She was accompanied by her 
chaperone, an elderly, plain person, and, beyond a 
simple inclination of the head on entering and 
leaving the room, recognized no one, for which she 
was set down as " cold " and "stiff " by her neigh- 
bors. One of the young men, who was studying 
law in Paris with his tutor, was a DeRochambeau, 
a lineal descendant of the Marquis De Rocham- 
beau, who gave such efficient and much-needed 
help to Washington at a critical time during the 
Revolution. This scion of a noble house was an 
amiable youth, a graceful dancer, and a great 
talker, whose aim in life was to " spend six months 
each in England and Germany, to master the 
languages, and then to enter upon a diplomatic 
career." 

In the evening the company always gathered 
in the salon for a social hour or two, when games 
were in order, and " kissing games " even were 
not despised by the younger and gayer members 
of the household ; but all was done heartily and 
openly, under the smiling eyes of Madame and the 
mothers of the young girls. Sometimes there was 
dancing ; but the French fashion of turning con- 
stantly in one direction, "like a top," said a 
scornful New-Yorker, soon causes an American 
head to swim. Once there was a " cotillon " or 



german, the great event of the season, when 
Madame herself, gracious and amiable, in black 
lace and fluttering lilac ribbons, opened the ball, 
and dancing continued until the " wee sma' 
hours." 

It was a cheerful household. The months that 
we spent there were happy ones, and we were 
sorry when the time came to bid good by to the 
various and interesting company who had lived 
together in such harmony under this friendly 
roof, all drawn together by the charms of beauti- 
ful Paris. Kind Madame and busy Mademoiselle 
are doubtless still at their posts, entertaining 
strangers as of yore ; and we mean to visit them 
again some day, for nowhere in all Paris, we 
think, could a pleasanter abode be found for our 
wandering country men and women on their 
travels. L. Le H. 



MR. BROWNING «,. MRS. BROWNING AS POETS. 

So much is required for duly estimating success 
in poetry that it is perhaps one of the most diffi- 
cult things to arrive at a correct and general con- 
clusion as to a poet's superiority. At the same 
time, our own convictions of the par excellence of 
national poets are sure to be mingled with much 
provincial infatuation. 

The most essential part of poetic greatness 
is the noble and profound application of ideas to 
life. Voltaire says a great poet receives his dis- 
tinctive character of superiority from his applica- 
tion to his subject, of the ideas on man, nature, 
and human life, which he has acquired for him- 
self. He also adds that, in his opinion, this appli- 
cation of ideas is the great merit of English 
poets. 

Prominent among the English poets are Mr. 
and Mrs. Browning. Which has the more claim 
to these elements of poetic pre-eminence ? 

As far as education is concerned, Mrs. Brown- 
ing had not only an equal basis with Mr. Brown- 
ing, in her masculine range of studies and mascu- 
line strictness of intellectual discipline, but she had 
an advantage over him in her choice and oppor- 
tunity for the extended study of the classics. 
Notwithstanding her poor health, she studied 
untiringly. While a confirmed and hopeless 
invalid, and imprisoned within four walls, her 



Lasell Leaves. 



87 



chosen companions were a Hebrew Bible and 
large print Greek books. She sought refresh- 
ment and oblivion from pain in these grave and 
deep tasks, which would seem to demand mascu- 
line powers in their best estate. 

Under these rigid circumstances she developed 
into the great artist and scholar. From her 
couch went forth the poems which have crowned 
her as the world's greatest poetess. During all 
her years of sickness and prostration she clung to 
literature and Greek, which were to her a source 
of relief and delight rather than an arduous and 
painful toil. 

As a person is judged by his works, let us 
notice how from such a fertile and extensive field 
of knowledge the immortal fruits of Mrs. Brown- 
ing's untiring labor compare with those of Mr. 
Browning. Meanwhile we will keep in mind the 
accepted idea that the essential part of poetic 
greatness lies in the application of an author's ideas 
on man, nature, and human life to his subject. 

One of the very finest of Mrs. Browning's early 
productions is "Lady Geraldine's Courtship," 
written in the space of twelve hours, in order that 
it might complete a volume, the manuscript of 
which was to -go to America inside the stated 
time. This delightful ballad must have been 
lying unborn in her brain and heart; but when we 
consider its length, poetic beauty, and the space of 
time in which it was put into form, it appears to 
us one of the most stupendous efforts of the 
human mind. 

Her " Casa Guidi Windows " was written dur- 
ing the time when her residence was in Florence. 
The Eureka, in the Part I. of this poem, gave vent 
to her enthusiasm at the Tuscan uprising. Dur- 
ing the Revolution of 1848 every heart from the 
Alps to Sicily, including Mrs. Browning's, was 
kindled with a passion for renewed liberty. She 
had a noble devotion to Italy, and faith in its 
regeneration was a prominent feature in her life. 
The Part II. was a sad sequel to the first part, but 
she derides not. She bows to the inevitable, still 
firm in the belief of a future living Italy. Happily, 
just before her death, she saw her beloved Italy 
free. Here in this poem is portrayed in a marvel- 
lous degree the heartiness and fervor with which 
her noble mind enters into the vital interests of a 
nation and its people. Surely there are here dis- 



played ideas that are most admirably drawn from 
life and applied to it. No patriot Italian gave 
greater sympathy to the aspirations of 1859 than 
Mrs. Browning, an echo of which the world has 
read in her "Poems Before Congress." Great 
was the moral courage of this woman to publish 
these poems, and at a time when England was 
most suspicious of Napoleon. Nor was Mrs. 
Browning so engrossed in the Italian welfare 
that she had no thought for other nations and 
other wrongs ; her interest in America was more 
than ordinary. 

" I'or poets (hear the word), 

Half poets even, are still whole democrats ; 

Oh not that we 're disloyal to the high, 

But loyal to the low, and cognizant 

Of the less scrutahle majesties !" 

In her poem "A Curse for a Nation," where 
she foretold the agony in store for America, and 
which has fallen upon us with the swiftness of 
lightning, she was loath to raise her poet's voice 
against us, pleading : — 

" For I am bound by gratitude, 
By love and blood, 
To brothers of mine across the sea, 
Who stretched out kindly hands to me." 

Many people rank " Aurora Leigh " as the 
highest and most finished expression of Mrs. 
Browning's genius. In none of her other works is 
there such variety of power, and such a blending 
of masculine understanding and feminine sensi- 
bility. She unfolds with great beauty of expression 
the truth that that is real art which assists in any 
degree to lead back the soul to contemplate God. 

Mrs. Browning has demonstrated the fact that 
the highest forms of the poetic art are within the 
scope of woman's genius. 

Let us now consider the subject on the other 
side, with regard to the writings of Mr. Browning. 

His poem, the "Sordello," the general public 
pronounced an unintelligible rhapsody, with no 
meaning at all, while the few who did take interest 
in it affirmed that there was meaning in it, if only 
patient and diligent search were put upon it. 
However, the world was not willing to take the 
trouble, and, besides, the world is so full of poetry 
that is intelligible that few can afford to spend an 
excess of time for ordinary rewards. 

A collection of Mr. Browning's dramatic and 



88 



Las ell Leaves, 



lyrical poems came out, called " Bells and Pome- 
granates, " — an affected designation which had the 
further disadvantage of having no hint as to the 
nature of its contents. One of the dramatic 
poems, " The Blot on the Scutcheon," was played, 
but without marked success. 

His volume entitled k ' Men and Women," and 
published by Ticknor & Fields, of Boston, was 
another collection of poems. In these the 
metaphysical and analytical qualities of Mr. 
Browning's genius are more distinctly displayed 
than the imaginative and purely poetical. Some 
of the selections, " Bishop Blougram's Apology," 
for instance, are as hard reading as one of Sir 
William Hamilton's lectures, or a chapter of 
Mill's Logic. Most readers have broken down on 
the early pages, and none but his most resolute 
admirers have succeeded in wading through it. 

Mr. Browning is not, moreover, a popular 
poet. He does not address the common heart, 
nor does he draw his themes from the daily paths 
of life. His sentences are often involved and in- 
tricate in construction, his parentheses too 
frequent and too long, his metaphors sometimes 
pushed to exhaustion ; his versification is lawless, 
and he has apparently little ear for rhythmical 
verse. 

The soul-slirring intimacy with nature that has 
given our lyric poets their greatest power was one 
of Mrs. Browning's strongest points. To read 
some of her minor poems, like " Isobel's Child," 
" Bertha in the Lane," and the " Swan's Nest 
among the Reeds," it is like standing in the 
forest alone, with the wailing wind and the flying 
rain as the only assurance of an existence sublimer 
than our own. Such gems as these reach the 
profoundest depths of the human heart. 

Canon Farrar in one of his lectures, two winters 
ago, remarked that, in his opinion, Mis. Browning 
wrote more true poetry in one line than Mr. 
Browning did in a whole page. 

Soon after Mrs. Browning's death a letter in 
the At/antic Monthly, written by W. W. Story, says : 
" Her life was one long, large-souled, large-hearted 
prayer for the triumph of Right, Justice, and 
Liberty, and she who lived for others was 

' Poet true, 
Who died for beauty as martyrs do 
For truth, the ends being scarcely two.'" 



Mr. Hillard, in his work, " Six Months in 
Italy," writes: "I have never seen a human 
frame which seemed so nearly a transparent vei 
for a celestial and immortal spirit." 

A noted spiritualist was travelling in Europe 
at the time when Mr. and Mrs. Browning were 
residing at Florence, and having heard much of 
Mrs. Browning's wonderful power as a poet, was 
very desirous of being presented to her. The 
spiritualist had been well received by all the 
crowned heads of Europe, and had on several 
occasions been asked to exhibit his interesting art 
before them. When he went to Florence, the 
home of the Brownings, his commendable desire 
to have a conversation with Mrs. Browning was 
gratified. Mrs. Browning and her husband were 
equally desirous to witness some professional art 
of his, but were too polite to mention it. How- 
ever, the spiritualist knew that they would be 
much pleased if he would show some evidence of 
his magic power, so when he arose and was mak- 
ing his adieus, he observed in a saucer,, on a 
stand near him, some laurel leaves. He casually 
took up one of them and twisted it around his 
finger. Then he took up another, and another, 
until he had taken all the leaves from the dish. 
By his wonderful power, as a spiritualistic medium, 
the leaves floated from his hand, and circled up in 
the form of a wreath, when it rested over Mrs. 
Browning's head just as he bowed himself from 
the apartments. 

Surely no more delicate compliment could have 
been paid her had she been the queen herself, 
and doubtless the spiritualist did the logical as 
well as the correct thing in giving the crown of 
laurels, not to Mr. Browning, but to his wife. 

E. I. Gale. 



Imogene Graham. Mr. Howells says you " let 
yourself go," Mrs. Mavering. What does he mean ? 
How did you do it ? 

Alice Pasmer Mavering. I do not know, 
I 'm sure ; or at least I do not think I could ex- 
plain it to you. But he says you ebbed away to 
the piano. Did you ebb ? 

Imogene. Well, not exactly ; I think, speak- 
ing conscientiously, Mr. Howells did not mean 
just that. 



Lasell Leaves. 



8 9 



Alice. Yes ? And we are so conscientious, 
you know ! Now, may I ask you a rude question, 
Miss Graham ? 

Imogene. Say Imogene, do .' 

Alice. Do you think Mr. Howells would ap- 
prove it ? My New England conscience makes 
me uneasy on many such points. 

Imogene. Why need you care what Mr. How- 
ells likes or dislikes? Why not '' keep clear*' of 
him ? 

.Alice. Oh ! He has been so kind to me ! I 
could n't — really. 

Imogens. Well, never mind ! What were you 
going to ask me a moment ago? Some ''rude 
question,'' I think you said. 

Alice. And you will not be angry ? Well, 
then, why did you refuse Mr. Morton, when you 
were in Florence ? 

Imogene. Mr. Morton? Oh, really. I don*t 
know! But why did you refuse Mr. Mavering that 
first time ? 

Alice. Well, he '• let himself go " one day in a 
most surprising way. and my Xew England con — 
but do tell me why you refused Mr. Morton. 

Imogene. I hardly know. — unless — yes! it 
must have been my Buffalo conscience. (SI a 
curtain.) M. A. T. S. 



EXTRACTS FROM A DIARY. 

Oct. 15. — Well. I'm here, and have brought 
a most amazing amount of merchandise in the 
shape of tears with me. The fact is. I have done 
nothing but distribute them around promiscuouslv 
ever since my arrival. As salt is beneficial, I 
think it may possibly improve my room-mate. 
Let us hope so. Now. my dear Diarv, vou know 
that, having once made up my mind concerning a 
person. I never change it, and that I always know 
immediately what I think of people. When I 
arrived I was told I was to room with a Miss 
Elsworth. The name suggested delightful possi- 
bdities. She would probably be, so I reasoned, 
poetical, soulful, sympathetic, and all things which 
are desirable in a companion. Her hrst name 
would probably be Margarete or something equally 
suitable. I pictured a grand looking girl with a 
pure Grecian profile, who read Byron, and talked 
of the ethics of sunset, and so forth. 

So I opened my room door, entered with a most 



cordal smile, which quickly disappeared when I 
beheld a tall, ungainly girl, dressed in one of those 
abominations which I subsequently discovered are 
called " gym suits." She was pale and sa low- 
looking, with small, glittering gray eyes, the only 
redeeming feature of her face being a verv win- 
ning smile, which, however, I have only seen from 
afar, and then bestowed upon two or three forlorn 
looking damsels, who. I am sure, were not half so 
well worth noticing as myself. (Outsiders would 
call this conceit, I call it truth.) But I am 
digressing. As she arose I said, " I am looking- 
for Miss Elsworth : beg pardon," and started 
to retreat, when she replied, '"I am Dianthv 
Maria Elsworth." 

It was too much. I sank in a dejected heap 
upon the floor, and when I looked up from the 
entombment of the last air-castlt, Dianthv had 
disappeared. I repeated to myself, '"What's in 
a name ? '" Evidently nothing in this case. 

I am going to write to mamma to take me home. 
I cannot live with such an unpossible person. 

Nov. 15. — "They say that Great Britain is 
going to decay." It has seemed as though the 
personality designated as Fussie Lighthead was in 
the same condition, or at least fast arriving: at the 
same stage as that most aggressive kingdom. As 
persons or things alike are either twins or a pair, 
it occurs to me what a unique specimen that blus- 
tering British lion and myself would make. As 
twins, every dime museum director in the countrv 
would be after us. I wonder what color it would 
be. — the mould I mean, — green or white? I 
should prefer the latter, as better suited to my com- 
plexion. 

But enough : I have been here a month, and 
stagnation does not express my condition. No 
parties, no gentlemen, monotony the staple article. 
The girls don't like me, neither do the teachers ; 
but then they never did, even in the infant class. 
We have nothing in common. Even our aims in 
education are different. I wish my political and 
social faculties educated ; they wish to cultivate 
in me morals and religion. Dianthv is the onlv 
person that puzzles me: she is enigmatical. A 
verv cold-hearted girl, singularly embarrassed at 
times, even with her most intimate friends; but 
she has an independence which often becomes 
p< silively aggiessive. She is generally disliked in 



go 



Lasell Leaves. 



school, and finds in me no exception to the com- 
mon judgment, as I cordially detest her ; partially 
because she shows so plainly how she despises 
some of my harmless little conceits, and my 
unconquerable love for fashion and clothes. It 
is rather bitter for me to have to look up, in many 
' things, to one whom I dislike. 

Dec. 15. — It is shocking how I forget to write 
in you. For days you have lain forgotten in my 
drawer. I made very good resolutions at first 
concerning you, but somehow, like all my resolu- 
tions, they did not amount to anything. I have 
been very ill, in fact have had pneumonia. 
Dianthy has been kindness itself. She is a lovely 
girl, so full of originality. The girls don't like 
her because they do not understand her. Her con- 
versation would always be most entertaining were 
she not prevented from letting her light so shine 
by that most unfortunate embarrassment and 
sensitiveness. She is, therefore, agreeable only 
to a few ; but she is fond of me — and — well, you 
see, I always did like her, I said so at the first, 
and I never change my mind. If there is one 
thing I do admire it is consistency ; and Dianthy 
is going home to spend Xmas with me. 

FUSSIE LlGHTHEAD. 



TO WASHINGTON AND EUROPE AGAIN. 

The popular tours of Lasell girls are so suc- 
cessful that many inquiries are being made as to 
what is proposed this year. Mr. Shepherd has al- 
ready issued a circular announcing the Washington 
excursion during the spring vacation, and a num- 
ber of engagements have already been made for 
that very pleasant trip in the sweet springtime 
of that climate, and there will soon be sent to you 
all a sketch of a tour of Europe which Mr. Shep- 
herd invites you to share with him. The party 
will sail by Cunard steamer u Pavonia," from 
Boston, June 14, and return by same line to 
Boston about Sept. 10. The route includes 
almost every principal point from Edinburgh to 
Mt. Vesuvius, and with the kind advice and assist- 
ance of Mr. Bragdon in the details throughout, a 
most perfect plan will be presented to you. Any 
correspondence in regard to either excursion will 
have prompt attention. Address, Wm. T. Shep- 
herd, Supt., Lasell Seminary, Auburndale, Mass. 



SANITARY LECTURES. 

The last, but not least, of Lasell's many inde- 
pendent departures is the department of Sanitary 
Science. No subject is, perhaps, so important 
and yet so little understood as that of healthful 
sanitation. 

In a course of seven lectures by Miss Talbot, of 
Boston, the topics Plumbing, Drainage, Ventila- 
tion, and Home Decoration were successively 
treated in a graceful and practical manner. 

By means of descriptive charts and ingenious 
mechanical contrivances, a thorough explanation 
of the subject treated was made, and the simplest 
methods of research and remedy for all sanitary 
evils suggested. 

Too much cannot be said as to the practica- 
bility and utility of such a course of lectures in 
preparing young women to be thorough, intelligent 
housekeepers. 



BOOKS ADDED TO THE LIBRARY OF LASELL SEMI- 
NARY IN JANUARY, 1888. 

Hill, David J. Elements of Psychology, 140.2 
Nuttall. Standard Dictionary . . 423.3 
O'Hagan, John. Translation of the Song 

of Roland ...... 841. 1 

Richardson, D. N. A Girdle Round the 

Earth ....... 913.6 

Smith, Gerard W. Spanish and French 

Painters ...... 756.3 



POLITICAL NOTES. 

The treaty of alliance between Italy and Ger- 
many stipulates that if France attacks either of 
the contracting powers, the other is to send three 
hundred thousand men to the French frontier 
immediately. 

Senor Castellar, in a speech in the Spanish 
Congress, said that he believed the hostility be- 
tween Russia and Germany was permanent, and 
that war, sooner or later, was inevitable. 

The King of the Greeks has conferred the 
Grand Cross of the Order of the Redeemer upon 
the Sultan, the insignia being set in diamonds. 
This is the first time that any sultan has accepted 
a Greek order. 



Lasell Leaves. 



9i 



The Moscow Gazette says Russia can no 
longer confide in allies whose hostility has been 
proved, and says an alliance between Russia, 
England, and France must be effected to counter- 
balance this "peace league." 

Ex-Senator David Merriwether of Ken- 
tucky, the appointed successor of Henry Clay, 
has recently been visiting Washington. He is 
eighty years old. 



SCIENTIFIC NOTES. 



Joseph Webber, a young telegrapher of New 
York, has invented an apparatus by which a 
piano may be played by electricity. It is de- 
scribed as quite simple and inexpensive, consid- 
ering its accomplishment. It may be attached to 
any piano, though an upright is best suited to it, 
having a good place to stow away the batteries. 
These electric piano players are recommended as 
an admirable substitute for the ordinary amateur, 
for they can play with much more force and quite 
as much expression. 

Excavations at Pompeii are giving the most 
interesting results. A wooden case was recently 
dug up containing a complete set of surgical in- 
struments, many of which are similar to those 
used at the present day. Many silver vases and 
urns were found, also gold ornaments, besides a 
beautiful statue of Jupiter seated on his throne. 
The excavations are being rapidly pushed for- 
ward. 

Great advances have been made during the last 
few years in the science of metallurgy. Many 
new metals have been discovered, and improved 
means have been devised to separate them from 
the ores in which they are found. Many metals 
would be of great value in the arts and manufac- 
tures if they could be produced cheap enough. 
Of this class is aluminum, a valuable but little 
known metal, which would revolutionize the 
whole manufacturing industry if it was not so ex- 
pensive. Although aluminum cannot yet be pro- 
duced at such a price that it can take the place of 
iron, the time may not be far distant when such 
will be the case, as it can already be obtained 
much cheaper than it could a few years ago. 



The month of February, 1866, was in one 
respect the most remarkable in the world's history : 
it had no full moon ! January had two full moons, 
and so had March, but February had none. Do 
you realize what a rare thing in nature that was ? 
It had not occurred since the time of Washington, 
nor since the discovery of America, nor since the 
beginning of the Christian era, nor since the crea- 
tion of the world. And it will not occur again, 
according to the computation of astronomers, for 

— how long do you think ? — two and a half million 
of years I Was not that truly a wonderful month ? 

— Golden Days. 



ART NOTES. 

Artists will be interested in this fact, for which 
we are indebted to the London correspondent of 
the Book Buyer : — 

" Within a stone's throw of the Langham Hotel, 
behind All Souls' Church, may be found the 
oldest sketching club in the world. Here, every 
week, on a Friday evening, a subject is chalked 
upon a slate. After coffee and chat, pipes are 
lit, and every one sets to work to carry out his 
own idea of the subject. At the end of three 
hours the sketches are gathered together and 
made the subject for friendly criticism ; and I can 
call to mind certain merry suppers and songs that 
occasionally took place subsequently." 

Most of the foremost London artists have be- 
longed to this club. 

A portrait of Count Leof Tolstoi, painted 
from life last summer, represents the aristocratic 
socialist ploughing in the fields with an unwieldy 
plough pulled by a white horse. The Count's 
gray beard streams across his blue blouse and 
half-bared breast, and his soft cap is pulled down 
over his eyes. The picture is characteristic, and 
is valuable from the fact that it was painted out 
in the fields while the Count was ploughing. 

The arguments in favor of the remission of the 
duty on foreign works of art, presented to Con- 
gress by Mr. William Schaus, a New York art 
dealer, have been often brought forward by Ameri- 
can artists and art patrons. Mr. Schaus says that 
the government of the United States is the only 
government in the world which appears to con- 
sider art as a superfluous luxury instead of a 



9 2 



Las ell Leaves. 



refiner and educator ; that the instruction to be 
derived from European art work is lessened by the 
tariff : that as American artists have long been wel- 
comed to European schools and to the use of Euro- 
pean collections, the tariff has conduced to a feeling 
abroad against American art students, and that 
as the tariff is prejudicial to the interests of Ameri- 
can artists, so it is highly antagonistic to the wishes 
and convictions of the most intelligent among 
them. In conclusion, it is stated that the revenue 
derived from the tariff levied upon important 
works of art is of trifling importance. 



MAJOR AND MINOR. 

Karl Klindworth seems to find most hearty 
and honest appreciation in the American Art 
Journal critic. Boston did not place him among 
the great pianists, although as an editor and critic 
he stands eminently high. 

Boston prides herself in having a lady whistler, 
Miss Ella Chamberlayne, and now Mrs. Alice 
Shaw sustains the reputation of New York in that 
line. 

Chopin was the most romantic piano-forte 
writer. 

It seems to be the general impression through- 
out this country that Boston is spoiling the boy 
Hofmann It is said that in no city has he 
created so much enthusiasm. He has given up- 
wards of a dozen concerts there, and the cry is 
still for more. 

Mr. Frank Stockton's tantalizing story, 
"The Lady or the Tiger," has been selected as 
the plot of an operetta. 

A Liszt Society has been formed in Vienna for 
L he presentation of this master's works. Liszt's 
known works are said to number 1,233, on ty 
206 of which have ever been performed. 



TEMPERANCE. 

The winecup is an opaque affair, at best, and 
God can never be seen through it. 

One of the strange delusions of social drinking 
is the belief that to offer a glass of intoxicating 
liquor to a fellow-mortal is a friendly act, that it 
draws men together, quickens social feelings, etc. 
This value of alcohol is false. Its failure is glar- 



ingly evident as soon as we trace it beyond the 
feelings. The value of a gift should not be esti- 
mated by its transient but by its lasting effects. 
Estimated by this standard, is the tender of in- 
toxicating liquor as an aid to sociability a friendly 
act ? Let facts speak. 

If the money spent for liquor by wage-earners 
were saved, the hard times would be at an end ; 
if used in business, it would no longer be possi- 
ble for speculators to organize a panic. 

7em/>erance, cleanliness, and industry! This is 
the hygiene of the Bible. A " pathy " as old as the 
race. A system of medication, applicable to all- 
climes and all constitutions ; always safe, always 
efficient, and to which human sagacity, in the 
space of six thousand years, has not added one 
radically new idea. 



EXCHANGE NOTES. 

It has too often proved true that "good be- 
ginnings make bad endings," but it is hoped that 
the High School Annual will keep up the standard 
which it has adopted in its first number, and prove 
one of our most enjoyable exchanges. The tone 
of the paper is remarkably good and the locals 
especially bright. 

We are at a loss to discover whether The Beacon 
took our college news " boiled, roasted, or rare," 
as their choice seems to have caused them so 
much distress. We will endeavor to have the 
cooking improved next time. They certainly 
made hash of it ultimately. We would say that 
we enjoyed — but no, anything, even a compli- 
ment, "evoked by the feminine mind when left to 
itself," would scarcely interest The Beacon. 

Those affected with melancholia and wishiug 
for enlivenment should visit "the new genius" 
of The Reveille. The paper is fortunate in its 
poetry, especially a very amusing bit styled "The 
Photograph." 

Noticeable among other good things in The 
Tech is an exceedingly good article on Books that 
have Hurt Me. That idea was unique and well 
carried into effect. 

After reading An Argument for Cremation, 
in The Advocate, we gladly turn even to Foe's 
stories to quiet our nerves. The writer should be 
complimented on his genius for vividly portraying 
the horrible. 



Las ell Leaves. 



93 



LOCALS. 

" It was only a glad good-morning, 
As she passed along the way, 
But it spread the morning's glory 
Over the livelong day." 

Attention, girls, every one who is inter- 
ested in ihe Lasell Leaves. Do not rest until 
you have read the advertisements in this paper, 
and we beg you to profit by them. 

Poor overworked Seniors ! One member of 
that grave and reverend band tried to shake off 
this mortal coil — a drop more and — " the end 
is really too sad to tell." 

The law lecture delivered by Mr. Hemenway 
on the evening of Jan. 18 was the first one of a 
course of ten. Much may be gained from these 
lectures, as they are both interesting and in- 
structive. 

Authority, not Webster : — 

Harpies. — Harp-players. 

A military tribune. — An editor. 

We did not go to the concert at Wellesley. 
Why? Because we heard of the invitation just a 
day too late. 

The day of prayer for colleges was observed at 
Lasell on Jan. 20. The regular school exercises 
were entirely suspended. The programme was 
as follows: 7 45, morning prayer; 9 00, teachers' 
prayer-meeting; 9.00, students' prayer-meeting, 
Miss Gray; 11.00, morning service; addresses, 
Dr. Ela, Dr. McKeown ; 4.00, vesper service, 
Rev. George S. Butters ; 7.30, students' Christian 
Endeavor meeting, Mrs. Cassedy. 

She came to Lasell to learn, and she found to 
her surprise that Lot was not the wife of 
Gomorrah. , 

On the evening of the moon's eclipse, 

A teacher chanced two maids to see, 

Who at the window side by side 

Gazed at the moon most earnestly. 

We blush to say, — Alas ! alas ! 

They viewed the moon through smoked glass. 

Mr. Willard Small, of No. 24 Franklin Street, 
presents us with a translation of " The Song of 
Roland," by John O'Hagan. Mr. Small is the 
publisher of the American copy. 



On Feb. 3, Miss Talbot gave her last lecture on 
Sanitation. The subject was house furnishing. 

The generous heart of Mabel Williams is but a 
copy of her father's, who has sent us a dozen soap- 
stone foot-warmers and hand-warmers, which are 
all ready in the heater, smoking hot, waiting for 
that big sleigh-ride. Do you hear the bells jingling 
now? Mr. Bragdon takes two of them every 
morning and puts them under his desk, and thinks 
he hears sleigh-bells. 

By the kindness of E. C. Thayer of Keene, 
one of the Board of Trustees, we have received a 
handsome book containing an account of the 
dedication of the splendid building of the Mur- 
dock School, at Winchendon, Mass. The town 
of Misses Best, Brown, Converse, and French 
evidently has a school budding to be proud of. 
May its teaching be as good as its architecture ! 
Oh for a Murdock for Lasell ! 

Many of the girls attended one of little Josef 
Hofmann's concerts, and joined in the general 
admiration. Several added to their list of enjoy- 
ments a musicale at the Riverside school. 

What is a swallow? A swallow is a bird. 
What is a bird ? A bird flies. What is a fly ? 
A fly is a bore. What is a bore ? A bore is a 
cooking lecture. Therefore, a cooking lecture is 
equal to one swallow. 

A Senior said it : — 

"Just think! If I only had a voice like Miss 

I could go to C, and then I 'd be happy." 

" What has voice to do with going to sea ? " 

The best thing of all is yet to come : military 
drill for the Lasell girls, — officers, swords, gold 
braid, and all. 

Sunday, Feb. 5. we had the pleasure of 
listening to one of Miss Bessie Gordon's inspiring 
talks. She spoke especially of woman's influence 
in the world and her consequent responsibility. 
After telling us of the work that had been already 
done, and giving us a glimpse of the work still 
before us, she invited non-members in behalf of 
the Lasell Y. M. C. T. U. to join the white- 
ribbon army, and the society is now rejoicing in 
ten new members. 



94 



Lasell Leaves. 



PERSONALS. 

Four weeks ago Prof. Bragdon was called West, 
for the third time in four months ; this time to 
attend the funeral of Mrs. George Bragdon, the 
mother of little Katie, who died but a short time 
ago. The circumstances were very sad, and much 
sympathy for the bereaved ones is felt by all the 
girls. 

Miss Call came back to us after the holidays, 
and we were delighted to see her again. 

There are now on exhibition at Williams & 
Everett's two pictures, painted in Paris, by Miss 
Elizabeth J. Gardiner. The one of " A Farmer's 
Daughter" won a medal, — the first medal given 
to an American woman. Lasell is much in- 
terested, and is proud of Miss Gardiner's success, 
because she began her art studies here, and was 
graduated in '56. 

Miss Mamie Peck, who was here last year, 
kindly sent a Christmas gift to the library of a 
book, by D. W. Richardson, called "A Girdle 
Round the Earth." It is a book of travels, said 
to be very interesting by those who have read it. 
Dr. Peck, Mamie's father, was one of the company 
of travellers. 

Lucy Harvey spent Sunday recently with 
Mary Beckwith. 

Miss Keith, Miss Sheldon's cousin, has been 
at Lasell for a few weeks. 

Miss Helen Westheimer has been for two 
months in the "great whirl " of New York life, 
and is now visiting in Baltimore, before returning 
to her home in St. Joseph, Mo. She writes : 
"Although, naturally, so many new faces must 
drive away the memory of older ones, I please 
myself with imagining that in some' children's 
hour one little thought is given to those who were 
so contented and happy in dear old Lasell. 

Lester Winfield Dann has made glad the 
hearts of Mr. and Mrs. Lyman Dann (Lou 
Fribley) since Dec. 8. 

Miss Louise Dietrick has been visiting Ella 
Race at her home in Decatur, 111. 

Lulu Walston, '85, surprised us by a short 
morning call not long ago. She is still at Smith 
College, but has been the guest of Etta Stafford 
for a few days. 



We learn that Lena Foster has been travelling 
most of this winter, and is now in Grand Rapids, 
Mich. 

Mary Witherbee is still teaching near her 
home in Laurel, Del. She is very useful in both 
places, as those who know her cannot doubt. 

The many friends of Miss LeHuray will be glad 
to learn that her youngest sister, who had for 
weeks been dangerously ill, is a very little better, 
— on the way to recovery, it is hoped. Mr. 
LeHifray, the father, is, as yet, no better. Miss 
Eleanor LeHuray has left the Mission station in 
Mexico, where she has done very efficient service, 
and is at home for a few months' vacation before 
going to a mission field in South America. 

We hear indirectly that Dora Walston was 

married to Mr. Johnson, and is now 

living at 628 W. Monroe Street, Chicago, but we 
don't know whether she wants anyone to know it 
or not. She will surely want to join the " Chicago 
Lasell Club." How we tremble for poor Mr. 
Johnson ! ! ! 

Miss Mary E. Brown, of Winchendon, Mass., 
here in '83, has recently lost her father, Mr. 
William Brown, Sr. Mr. Brown was a well-known 
citizen of Winchendon, preserving the homestead 
inherited from his father, and leaving it for his 
family as a part of the large estate for which he 
had cared with wise success. The sympathy of 
old friends here is not wanting for the bereaved 
daughter in her great sorrow. 

Mrs. John P. Dunsmore (John P. is the artist 
brother of our Alice of '78) called in December. 
She reports Mr. Dunsmore's work in considerable 
demand in London, where he is now working. 

A pleasant meeting was had at Ruggles 
Street Church with Mamie Colson Curtis here in 
1880. She introduced her husband as if she was 
not ashamed of him, spoke motherly of her year- 
old babe, and looked as if she was happy and 
well and strong. It did our eyes good to look at 
her. We liked her husband too. She still lives 
at Somerville. 

Alice Hyde, here in 1874-75, also greeted 
us that day. She is well. 

Florence Bailey took her sister back to Erie 
without showing her Lasell ! This is simply incom- 
prehensible. 



Lasell Leaves. 



95 



Miss Lillie Potter, of Chicago, a graduate of 
Lasell in '80, and since abroad for some years, is 
doing herself and her alma mater much credit by 
her lectures. They are given to private classes. 
They cover a wide range of topics, but all relate 
to Germany, its history, geography, literature, 
and social life. Miss Potter is fitted to do ex- 
cellent work of this sort. Her personal presence, 
tact, culture, and sincerity will not fail to make 
their way. Qa va sans dire. The lectures are 
given weekly, from October to May. Chicago 
Lasell girls would do well to join these classes, 
which include many prominent ladies of the Gar- 
den City. 

Mr. Edward Page gave a coming-out party to 
his daughter, Miss Lilla M. Page, the evening of 
February 1. It was a pleasant social event, and 
brought together the prominent young society 
people of the city. Nearly two hundred guests 
were present and participated in the festivities. 

Miss Nellie Packard, '83, came back again 
for a ^hort visit. 

On the evening of January n, Miss Ada 
Langley gave a reading in the Hawthorne Rooms, 
Boston. It was her first appearance in public, 
and a great success. Miss Langley was a late 
pupil at Lasell, and studied elocution with Miss 
Call. 

We caught a glimpse of Miss Jennie Brown in 
chapel, two weeks ago. She is at present in New- 
tonville, where she studies elocution with Miss 
Call. 

Tassie Johnson came to see her old friends 
one afternoon last month. 

Married at Elizabeth, N. J., Feb. 1, 1888, 
Miss Susan S. Griggs and Dr. Norton L. Wilson. 
" At home," 228 Elizabeth Avenue. 

At Gardner, Mass., January 3, Miss Emma 
Fiske Eaton was married to Mr. Charles Leslie 
Bent. 



Saw Lucy Phelps waiting for a street car Jan. 
17 in Boston. She is there a few days with her 
father. May come out. Looks well. Later : 
Did come and see and conquer. 

Alice Howard, of Boston, here in '79, is 
spending the winter at Hotel Hunnewell, Newton. 
She looks taller than she used, although she de- 
clares she has not grown any. Her short hair is 
becoming, and she studies music and French in 
Boston. 

AMATEUR PHOTOGRAPHIC OUTFITS, 

All Sizes and Styles at Lowest Prises. 

BENJ. FRENCH cSt, CO. 

319 Washington Street - - Boston, Mass. 

SHREVE, CRUMP & LOW, 

432 WASHINGTON ST. 

BOSTON. 



\)(/ atches, ^jj iamerids, 
(Jewelry ; 

Honest vr otter u. 



SPECIAL ATTENTION GIVEN TO DESIGNS IN 
GOLD AND SILVER FOR PRIZES, ETC 




SEPHf*iLL©¥TS 

STEEL** POtS. 



<§y THE FAVORITE NUMBERS, 303,404, 332, 351, 170, 
*' AN D HIS OTH Eft STYUES 

SOLD by ALL DEALERS throughout the WORLD. 




96 



Lasell Leaves. 



FRENCH 

SHIRTINGS. 



Chevints, 

English & 
French 

Flannels 
& Silk 
Shirtings, 



Fpr Tennis, 

" Railway Car, 

" Steamer Trav- 
" elling", 

" Hunting, 

" Pishing, 

" Yachting. 

Always in stock or 

made to special 

measure. 



NOYES BEOS. 

Washington and Summer Sts. 

BOSTON, U. S. A, 



at 



London Tan Street Gloves, warranted, 
$1.35, at Noyes Bros. 

Dress Shirts, for Weddings, for Receptions, 
for Dinner Parties, with Collars, Cuffs, and 
Cravats, in the latest English styles. Plain 
French Bosoms, fine Embroidered Spots, 
Figures and Cords, at Noyes Bros. 

English Cheviots, English and French Flan- 
nels, Silk and Wool and Pure Silk Shirt- 
ings, for Tennis, for Steamer Travelling, 
for Hunting and Fishing, for Railway and 
Yachting. Always in stock or made to 
special measure, at Noyes Bros. 

English Mackintosh Coats, for Ladies and 
Gentlemen, at Noyes Bros. 

English Bugs and Shawls, for Steamer and 
Railway use, at Noyes Bros. 

English Flannel, Blanket and Shawl Wraps, 

for the Sick-Room, for Steamer and Railway 
Travelling. For the bath and house use they 
are indispensable. $3.25 to $65.00. 

English Neckwear, at Noyes Bros. 



Underwear and Hosiery, in Pure Silk, Lambs' 
Wool, Merino, Balbriggan and English Cotton, 
for early fall wear, at Noyes Bros. 

English Flannel Pajamas, Long Flannel 
Night Shirts and Wraps, for steamer and rail- 
way travelling, at Noyes Bros. 



Full Evening Dress Shirts, 
Collars and Cravats 

Constantly on hand, for Dinner Parties, 
Weddings, or any occasion. 

The present English Fashion of shirts made 
with Linen Cords and Spot Bosoms may be 
had of Noyes Bros. 



ENGLISH DRESSING GOWNS, 

JACKETS AND WRAPS. 



Lawn Tennis Shirts, Coats and Hose. 



TENNIS BELTS AND CAPS in Stock and 
made to measure from choice styles of ENG- 
LISH FLANNELS. 

CLOVES of Every Description, for Dress, 

Street, Driving, and the famous London Tan, 
at $1.35, at Noyes Bros. 



JURORS' A WARD for beauty of work- 
manship and design, and distinguished 
excellence in the manufacture 
of Shirts, to 

NOYES BEOS. 

Washington and Summer Streets, 
BOSTON, U, S. A. 



ESTABLISHED 1817- 



JOHN H. PRAY, SONS & CO. 

Importers. Jolliers, Retailers and Manufacturers' igents. 

Carpetings, Mattings, Oil Cloth, 

ORIENTAL r tjg-s, 

CARPETS AND UPHOLSTERY. 



558 and 560 Washington St., 

30 to 34 Harrison Ave. Extension, 



BOSTON. 



113 Worth Street 



NKW YORK, 



Lasell Leaves. 



97 



A. STOWELL & CO. 

24 Winter Street, Boston. 



^orcie of our. Specialties : 

Bohemian Garnet Jewelry. 

Amber Beads and Ornaments. 

Tortoise-Shell Hair Pins. 

Choice Leather Goods. 

Oxidized Silver Jewelry. 

Fans for all occasions. 

Pearl Opera Glasses. 

Fine Gold Jewelry. 

Wedding Presents in Clocks, Vases and 
Bronzes. 

LATEST NOVELTIES IN ALL DEPARTMENTS. 
Lowest Prices. 



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E 



YOUNG LADIES' 

OOTS, SHOES AND SLIPPERS, 

Stylish and Durable at Moderate Prices. 

GYMNASIUM SHOES A SPECIALTY. 

Thayer, McNeil Sc Hodgkins, 



47 TEMPLE PL 



BOSTON. 



ARTHUR P. SCHMIDT & CO. 

IMPORTERS OF AND DEALERS IN 

FOREIGN AND AMERICAN 

Sheet Music. 

Sole Agents lor Litolffs celebrated Edition of 
Classical and Modern Music. 

13 AND 15 WEST ST., BOSTON. 

Catalogues sent free on application. 

BOSTON FOREIGN BOOK STORE, 

BOOKS IN ALL FOREIGN LANGUAGES, 

CARL SCHOENHOF, 

144 Tremont Street - - - - One Plight Up. 



C. B. Wo .ids. 



H. J. Wood. 



C. B. WOODS & CO. 



MANUFACTURERS OF 



Fine Furniture, 

Upholstery, Draperies, Wood Mantels 
and Interior Finish. 

OFFICE AND WAREROOMS, 

105 and 107 Chauncy Street, Boston. 



JOHN J. O'BRIEN, 

Picture Frames 

Of Every Description, Wholesale and Retail. 

OLD FRAMES IR IE G- 1 31, T . 

69 CORNHILL, BOSTON. 



ESTABLISHED IS40. 



Isaac Locke & Company, 

Produce Commission Merchants, 

A nd Dealers fit 

FOREIGN and DOMESTIC FRUITS 

97, 99 aim 101 Faneuil Hall Market, and Basement 18 Sontli Side, 

BOSTON - - - MASS. 

Telephone Connection. 



9 8 



Lasell Leaves. 



xWEBERS^- 

25, 27 TEMPLE PLACE BOSTON, 

J±NT> 33 "WEST STREET, 

Ladies' and Gents' Restaurant, 

Oysters and Salads a Specialty. 

OPEN AFTER THEATRES. 

Caterer for Wedding Breakfasts, Lunches, Dinner and Evening Parties 

and Receptions. Also, Club Suppers at Short Notice 

and Reasonable Prices. 

S. W. BAILEY, 

— DEALER IN — 

WATCHES, JEWELRY, SILVERWARE, ETC. 

353 Washington Street, Boston. 

Jewelry Neatly Repaired. Also, Monograms on Coin Pieces. Personal 
Attention given to Repairing Fine Watches. 

ESTABLISHED 1847- 



AARON R. GAY & CO. 

No. 122 State Street, Boston, 

STATIONERS 



AND 



BLANK BOOK MANUFACTURERS, 



First-Class Account Books of any desired 
pattern made to order. 

S. S. GAY. EDWIN W. GAY, 

JUST WHAT HAS BEEFWANTED. 

A LADIES' LUNCH ROOM 

HAS BEEN OPENED AT 

23 AVON STREET, BOSTON. 

A quiet, neat place, where a nice Lunch can be had at a very reason- 
able price. All the ladies say, " Isn't it nice ?" 

T. D. COOK, Caterer. 

ALSO, 

Wielding and. other Parties 

Served with the Choicest Viands, and by Competent Waiters. 

SUPERIOR ICE-CREAM 

DELIVERED AT REASONABLE PRICES. 



•+- 



THE 



YOUTH'S COMPANION, 

A WEEKLY PAPER FOR 

YOUNG PEOPLE and the FAMILY, 

It aims to be a favorite in every family — looked for eagerly 
by the \oung folks, and read with interest by the older. Its purpose is to 
interest while it amuses; to be judicious, practical, sensible, and to have 
really permanent worth, while it attracts for the hour. 

It is handsomely illustrated, ar.d has for contributors some of 
the most attractive writers in the country. 

Subscription Price, SI. 75. Specimen copies sent free. Please 
mention in what paper you read this advertisement. 

PERRV MASON &. CO. 

41 TEMPLE PLACE, BOSTON, MASS. 



FINE FURS. 

The best Quality of all kinds of Furs in popular use. 

Seal English Jackets, 

Seal Dolman Wraps. 

Seal Sacques. 

We give particular attention to orders by measure, and using the 
richest and most durable of genuine Alaska Seals, assure the fullest 
satisfaction in quality and fit. 

The fashionable 

BLACK BEAR BOAS, 

of exquisite fineness and beauty, made from skins of rare quality. 

Fur Collars, Capes, Cuffs, Boas, 

Hats, Sleighing Hoods and Gloves, 

FUR TRIMMINGS. 

Gentlemen's Fur-lined Overcoats. 

Fur Mats and Carriage Robes. 

Joseph A. Jackson, 

412 Washington Street - - Boston. 

Establixhed IS 25. 

NATHAN NEAT & CO. 

MANUFACTURERS OF 







BASKET TRUNKS AND STEAMER CHAIRS. 
Stateroom and Light-Weight Trunks for European Travel. 



SEND FOR ILLUSTRATED CATALOGUE. 



55 6 WA SHI NGTON ST., BOSTON, MASS. 

ELEGANT TOMlfi! 

At Popular Prices. 



F. M. HOLMES FURNITURE CO., 

116 TREMONT ST., BOSTON, MASS. 



LEVI S. GOULD. 



FRANK A. PATCH. 



Lasell Leaves. 



99 



EDWIN C. BURT & CO.'S 

FINE SHOES AND SLIPPERS 



FOR LA 

ARE THE 

Fit Perfectly. 
Easy en the Feet, 
Superior in Styta 



DIES AND CHILDREN 

BEST SHOES MADE. 

Ccst no More 

Than any Other 

Fine Shoes. 




Mr. JOSEPH A. HILLS 

has removed to more commo- 
dious music rooms in 

Hotel Pelham, 

Cor. Tremont and Boylston Sts., 

BOSTON, MASS., 

where he will be pleased to meet 
his pupils and others for pro- 
fessional engagements. 

Competent assistants under Mr. 
Hills' s supervision will attend to 
the instruction of those less ad- 
vanced who naty desire lessons 
at reduced rates. 



For sale by leading retail shoe dealers in nearly every city throughout the United States and 
Canada. All widths *of Lasts, any style of Shoe, Sole, Toe, or Heel. If you cannot 
get our make of shoes from your dealers, send address for directions how to procure them. 

EDWIN C. BURT & CO., Manufacturers 

NEW YORK. 

SPECIAL AGENTS IN BOSTON, 

Jordan, Marsh & Co., Washington St. 

THE "PEERLESS" FOUNTAIN PEN 



Conductors, Concert, Opera and 
Church Singers, Pianists, Organ- 
ists, Accompanists and Teachers 
supplied at the 

MUSIC TEACHERS' BUREAU, 

HOTEL PELHAM, 

BOSTON, MASS. 



CONOVER BROTHERS' CO. 
piai^ofort^ /T)apuf y 

14th St. and 9th Ave., New York. 

Clear, silvery, even tone through- 
out. Durable and elegant design. 
Indorsed by the profession. 

BOSTON WAREROOMS, 

Hotel Pelham. 




IS THE PERFECTION OF FOUNTAIN PENS. 

Is a hard rubber holder fitted with a 16 k. gold pen of the best manufacture, and will never wear out. It will write ten thousand words with one 
filling of ink, and for taking lectures, etc., it is indispensable. There is no loss of time in dipping ink as with the ordinary pen, as the " Peerless " 
has a perfect, even and uninterrupted flow of ink, and is the best fountain pen manufactured. Price, $>2.00. 4 

The Cross Stylographic Pen, Stylographic Ink. All styles of Stylographic, Fountain, and Gold Pens repaired. 



THE CROSS PEN CO., 306 Washington St. 



BOSTON, MASS. 



1TEST DOOIS TO OLID SOT^T!! CHITECH. 



IOO 



Lasell Leaves, 



C. H. CODMAN & CO. 

Photographic Material, 

PICTURE and FRAME DEALERS' 

O SUPPLIES I> 
Wholesale an,/ Retail Framing 

AMATEUR PHOTOGRAPHIC APPARATUS, 

34 BROMFIELD STREET, 

BOSTON - - - MASS. 

W. H. FRENCH & CO. 

PLUMBERS, GAS FITTERS, 

AND 

SANITARY ENGINEERS. 

JUDSON'S BUILDING, OPP. RAILROAD STATION, 
WEST NEWTON. 



All Work Promptly Attended to and Warranted Satisfactory. 

Overt , hack, 



A.ND 



BOARDING STABLE. 



iSTABLISHED IS6I 



S. F. CATE, WEST NEWTON, 



Barge "City of Newton." 

Boat Sleigh "Snow Bird." 

H. H. NEWELL, 

DEALER IN 

BOOTS, SHOESi RUBBERS, 

Auburn Street, Auburndale, Mass. 



New York and Beyond, 

via FALL RIVER LINE. 



ONLY $3 FOR FIRST-CLASS LIMITED TICKETS. 



SPECIAL EXPRESS leaves Boston from Old Colony Station daily 
(Sundays excepted i at 6 p. m., connecting at Fall River (49 miles) in 75 
minutes with the steamers Bristol and Providence. Heated throughout 
by steam and lighted by electricity. An orchestra on each steamer. Due 
to arrive in New York about 7.30 a. m ; connection to Brooklyn and Jersey 
City by annex boat. Returning, leave New York daily (Sundays ex- 
cepted) at 4.30 p. m. Baggage checked from hotel or residence in Boston 
to destination. Tickets, State-rooms, etc., secured at the Line office, No. 
3 Old State House, and at the Old Colony Station. 



L. H. PALMER, 

Agt., 3 Old State House. 



J. R. KENDRICK, 

General Manager. 



ALLEN &c BARRY, 

House and. Sign .Painters, Grazing, Graining, 

Kalsoinining and. "Whitening. 

Paints, Oils and Varnishes constantly on hand. 

WASHINGTON ST. (near R. R. Crossing), WEST NEWTON. 



C. T. Allen. 



D. Barry. 



BL . H . HUNT, 

CARPENTER AND BUILDER, 

WEST NEWTON, MASS. 
Stop near E. E. Crossing, P. Box 235. 

WAPI1 l, Pfl CARRIAGE AND WAGON BUILDERS, 
\1 illlU «UU.| Cor. Elm and Washington Sts., near City Hall, 

■WEST NEWTON. 

Fine Carriages and Wagons < f any description built to order and War- 
ranted to give satisfaction, ("arrage Painting aid Repairing in all its 
branches promptly and thoroughly execuied at fair prices. The Repair- 
ing of Fine Carriages a Specialty. 

Carriages Sent for and Returned Free of Charge. 

Boston Gossamer Rubber Co. 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

Gossamer Clothing. 

LEATHER COATS AND VESTS, 

HOOP-SKIRTS AND BUSTLES. 

611 Washington St., Boston, Mass. 

S. KLOUS, Treasurer. 

B. G. BAKER, 

COAL AND WOOD, 

Auburndale and West Newton, 



Lasell Leaves. 




THOMAS HALL, 

MAHUFACTS3IN& 

Electrician 



■AND- 



Optician. 



Manufacturer and Importer of 

Telegraphic, Electric, Mag- 
netic, Galvanic. Optical 
aud Meteorological 
Instruments. 

Chemicals, Chemical and Philo- 
sophical Apparatus of all Descrip- 
tions. Illustrated Catalogue of 
each Department. 

Hall's Pat. Medical Batteries. 
19 BEOMFIELD ST., BOSTON, MASS. 

1835, Eaalsl DstIs, Jr. 1849, Palmer k Hall, 1856, Thomas Ball. 

WADSWORTH & PICKERING, 
COMMISSION MERCHANTS, AND JOBBERS IN 

BUTTER, CHEESE, EGGS, ETC. 

STALL, 89 QUINCY MARKET 



Briggs Wadsworth. 



BOSTON. 

F. A. Pickering. 



CHARLES H. WHITING, Formerly Hall & Whiting, 
Stationer and Blank book manufacturer 

Importer and Jobber. Publisher and Book Solter. School and Miscel- 
laneous Books. Crane's Fine Stationery. American, English, French 
and German Fancy and Staple Stationery. Weston's Ledger Papers. 

163 and 170 Devonshire Street, Boston. 



FROST & ADAMS, 

Importers of. in! Wholesale and Eetatl Dealers la 

ARTISTS' MATERIALS, 

DECORATIVE ART NOVELTIES, ART 
POTTERY, ETC. 



Ebonized Panels. 

Winsor & Newton's Colors. 

German Colors. 

French Colors. 

Tucker & Green's Colors. 

Sketch Blocks. 

Plaques of all kinds. 

China Colors. 

Mirrors for Decorating. 

Artists' Boxes. 

Artists' Brushes. 

Artists' Canvas. 

Handbooks on Art. 

Studies of all kinds. 

Lustra Painting Materials. 



Water-Colors. 

Bronzes. 

Brocades. 

Spangles. 

China for Decorating. 

Paper Panels. 

Tambourines. 

Repousse Materials. 

Canvas Stretched. 

Drawing Instruments. 

Plaque Rims. 

Artists' Easels. 

Drawing Paper. 

Materials for Tapestry, etc. 

Kensington Painting Materials. 



SCHOOLS rfP STUDENTS SUPPLIED 

AT LOW FIGURES. 

37 CORNHILL - - BOSTON. 

SEND FOR A CATALOGUE. 
F. S. Fro9t. H. A. Lawbewob. 



ELLIOT W. KEYES, 

APOTHECARY, 



GEORGE E. JOHNSON, 



Haskins' Block - - 

auburndali 



Auburn Street, 

MASS. 



FALL AND WINTER MILLINERY. 

MRS. M. H. KIMBALL., 

Dealer in FRENCH FLOWERS, HATS, BONNETS and TRIMMINGS, 

MELROSE STREET, AUBURNDALE. 

v. aT pluta, 
DUO PPxOVISIONS, 

Cor. Auburn and Lexington Streets. 
"AL FRED BRUSH, 
APOTHECARY, 

Plummer's Block, Cor. of Auburn and Lexington Sts. 
auburndale. 

"nTwTfARLEY. G. D. HARVEY. A. C. FARLEY. 

FARLEY, HARVEY & CO. 

Importers and Jobbers of 

sTDsES-Z" * G-OODS. 

61 anil 67 Channeey, 39, 41 and 43 Bedford Sis,, BOSTON. 

~FARNUM &, COMPANY, 
PRODUCE COMMISSION MERCHANTS, 

Wholesale Dealers in Apples, Potatoes, Cranberries, Onions, Peas, 

Beans, Dried Apples, Oranges and Lemons; 

Nos. so8 and no Faneuil Mall Market - - BOSTON. 

Ha^RY Farnum. W. W. Lawrence. 



•DEALER IN- 



Hay, Grain and Feed, 

Lexington Street, 

AUBURNDALE, MASS. 

CHARLES G. TINKHAM~ 

Lifery, Hack null Broil Stalin, 

Cor. of Lexington and Severn Sts., 
AUBURNDALE. 

"Johnston & keyes, 

AUBURNDALE AND BOSTON EXPRESS. 



BOSTON OFFICES, 

10S Arch Street, 
34 Court Square. 



AUBURNDALE OFFICE, 
Lexington Street, 
Near the Depot 



H. EUGENE FLEMING, F>H. Q. 

PHARMACIST, 

FINE CONFECTIONERY a Specialty. 

Near City Hall - . We3tNewtcn.Ms.8S. 




^w^^IP^bPH 



MARCH, 1888 




Lfl$ECC LE/U/^S 



VOLUME XIII. -No. 6. 



CONTENTS. 



Editorials 103 

Some Phases of Society 104 

A Romance of the Lone Star State . . • .105 

Diamond Hill School-House 107 

The Fate of a Flower 10S 

The Eighth Wonder of the World . . . .109 

Lasell in Europe, 1888 109 

Political Notes no 



Scientific Notes 
Art Notes 
Major and Minor 
Temperance Items 
Exchanges 
February 22 . 
Locals 
Personals 



no 
no 
in 
in 
in 
112 
112 
114 



Lasell Leaves, 



NOVELTIES 



OUR SPECIALTIES. 



•IN- 



MILLINERY 



RECEIVED DAILY FROM PARIS and LONDON, 



Ladies are invited to call and examine before purchasing 
elsewhere. Correct Styles. Popular prices. 



HENRY M. BURR & CO. 



490 'Washington Street, 



BOSTON. 



AMERICAN WATCHES, 

DIAMONDS, 

Sterling Silver Ware, French Clocks and Bronzes, Fine 
Plated Ware, Jewelry and Fancy Goods. 

Designs and estimates for class rings, pins and badges furnished 
without charge. 



N. G. WOOD & SON, 

444 Washington Street, Boston. 

LAWRENCE, WILDE & CO. 

Manufacturers ef First-Class 

FURNITURE 



AND 



INTERIOR DECORATIONS, 

Nos. 38 to 48 CornMl - - Boston. 



, A. Lawrence. 
Wm. H. Hull. 



Geo. B. Darrow. 
F. D. Wilde. 



ESTABLISHED 1830. 



ALFRED MUDGE & SON, 

PRINTERS, 

No. 24 FRANKLIN STREET, BOSTON, MASS. 

/HAVE UNSURPASSED FACILITIES FOR 

B^K)K AND MISCELLANEOUS PRINTING, 

ELECTROTYPING AND STEREOTYPING, 

MERCANTILE AND COMMERCIAL PRINTING, 

FANCY BALL AND SOCIETY PRINTING. 



LAW WORK A SPECIALTY. 

A FULL LINE OF WEDDING STATIONERY ENGRAYED OR PRINTED. 

WEDDING OUTFITS executed In the finest manner at reasonable prices. 

Information regarding work in any department will at all times be promptly furnished, either 
personally or by correspondence. 

ALFRED MUDGE & SON, 24 FRANKLIN STREET. 



Lasell Leaves. 



101 



C. D. COBB & BROS. 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 

GROCERIES 

Of the Very Finest Quality, 

And IMPORTERS of 

^8FANCY GRADES TEAS 9- 

Every Article Warranted. 



Orders of $20 and upwards Delivered at any 
point within lOO miles of Boston. 



FOR PARTICULARS, SEND FOR CATALOGUE TO 

C. D. Cobb & Bros. 

722 to 732 Washington Street, 
BOSTON - - - MASS. 



COBB, BATES & YERXA, 

IMPORTERS 



AND 



GROCERS. 



Twenty-dollar orders delivered free at any station 
within 50 miles of Boston, and fifty-dollar orders at 
any station in New England, at our regular retail prices. 



COBB, BATES k YERXA, 

680 to 692 Washington Street, 
3 Bowdoin Square, 

6 and 8 Faneuil Hall Square 



Also in 



CHELSEA, FALL EIVEE and TAUNTON. 



T. E. MOSELEY & CO. 



DEALERS IN 



BOOTS, SHOES, RUBBERS, ETC. 

FOR LADIES, GENTLEMEN, BOYS, 
MISSES AND CHILDREN. 

A Large Assortment for 

YOUNG LHDIES. 



GYMNASIUM SHOES 

In Great Variety. 

ENGLISH LAST WALKING BOOTS, 

IN CALF or GOAT, 
Are SENSIBLE, DURABLE, and REASONABLE in Price. 



T. E. MOSELEY & CO. 

469 Washington Street, 

BOSTON. 



GOOD MUSIC FOR ALL THE YE AR ROUND. 

Is found in such books as the following, which, when kept at hand, fur- 
nish unfailing entertainment for the player or singer. 

Song Classics for Low Voices. 

(one dollar.) 
About 50 Gems of Song by the best modern composers: Rubinstein, 
Lassen, Grieg, Gounod and others. A true treasure for Alto, Baritone 
and Bass Voices. 

SONG- CLASSICS. 

(ONE DOLLAR.) 

For voices of average compass. All selected from the best sources. 
JPIAJNJ-O CLASSICS. 

(ONE DOLLAR.) 

An admirable collection of pieces in the best taste, by some of the best 
iving composers. 

YOUNG PEOPLE'S CLASSICS. 

(ONE DOLLAR.) 

Easy pieces that will please all, young or old. 

The GJ-ood. Old Songs "We Used to Sing. 

($r.oo paper; $1:25 bds.) 
A grand good new book, which will be received with open arms in 
every household. About 120 songs, with piano or organ accompaniment. 
Each one has been a distinguished success. Many are new to the pres- 
ent generation. Mailed for Retail Price. 

OLIVER DITSON & CO., BOSTON. 

GEO. E. ALLEN, 

12 Winter Street - - - - Boston, 

TRIMMINGS, BUTTONS, LACES, YARNS, CORSETS, 



AND FANCY 



GOODS. 



VOUNG'S HOTEL 

EUROPI 



ROPEAN PLAN. 

OPPOSITE THE HEAL OF STATE STREET, BOSTON. 

Ladies' entrance. Court Street, near Washington Street. 

J. R_ WHIPPLE, PROPRIETOR. 



102 



Lasell Leaves. 



hastings, 
Qhe (Photographer. 



ffize offer fo ii)c (^raduafirjq ar)d U.r)dep 
Slersscs, arjd also fo frjcir rjurnerous pierjds, 
unusual ad"$ar)fages, Botrj |oj? excellence o[ 

PHOTOGRAPHIC WORK 

ctr)0 reasonable prices. we guararjfee frje 

rrjosf e/lrfisfic lfreducfiorjs rrjade. 



No. 147 Tremont Street 

corner of West Street, 



BOSTON 



MASS. 



LADIES' FINE FOOTWEAR. 



We have added for Spring and Summer, many new lines, in- 
cluding specialties of which we have exclusive control. 



GYMNASIUM SHOES, 
WEDDING AND PARTY 
BOOTS AND SLIPPERS. 



HENRY H. TUTTLE & CO. 

436 Washington Street, 
BOSTON. 




THE CLASSY 






PHOTOGRAPHER 



••-«- 






For Lasell Seminary, 



*'88* 



Studio, 22 Winter Street, 



BOSTON. 



LASELL LEAVES. 



DUX FEMINA FACTI." 



Volume XIII 



LASELL SEMINARY, AUBUpEALE, MASS, MARCft 1BBB. 



{lumber G, 



LASELL LEAVES. 

Published Monthly, during the School Year, 

BY THE 

Lasell Publishing Association 

OF 

LASELL SEMINARY FOR YOUNG WOMEN, 
Auburndale, Mass. 

Editor-in-Chief. 
MARY LOUISE COLE, '38. 

Local Editor. 
ELIZABETH M. CAMPBELL. 



Political Editor. 
GRACE C. HUNTINGTON, '89. 

Scientific Editor. 
JULIA L. COY. 



Art Editor. 
GRACE W. SKINNER. 

Exchange Editor. 
HELEN R. GILBERT, '89. 



Musical Editor. 
MAUDE OLIVER, 



Business Ma nager. 

A. LINA JONES, '88. 
Subscription Agent. 
ANNETTE V. McDONALD. 



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One Copy, one year (including postage) . . #1.00 
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Press of Alfred .Under &» Son, 24 Franklin St., Boston. 



Before folding our tent and quietly stealing 
from the scene of action, we wish to add our tes- 
timony to that of the last editorial board, that 

" Strange mistakes do oft combine 
To so change the strongest line, 
That words and sense refuse to jine." 

For instance, in the last number the Wadsworth 
motto from '' Ten Times One " was by some mis- 
take attributed to Wordsworth. We might go on 
with our enumeration, but doubtless the current 
number will furnish illustrations all its own. 

When statements become tangled it is not easy 
to fill in vacant spaces and correct ideas, espe- 
cially when the author of an article has herselffor- 
gotten the thought which she wished to convey. 
The editor could readily furnish new material to 
that part of a grammar which contains sentences 
to be filled out, only the poor students who had 
the sentences to complete would be fit subjects for 
pity. 

As may have been noticed, the suggestion about 
" Egypt's oldest mummy " has been carried out 
extensively, and has proved a never-failing source, 
for the editor ; but alas ! we shrink from describ- 
ing its effect upon our patient readers. Still, we 
cannot forbear brief mention of the very oldest 
mummy of all, thinking that, however tough and 
impervious it has previously shown itself, an ad- 
ditional exposure must surely cause it to crumble 
and fall away. We refer to the receipt of the 
usual letter from the South, with its interesting 
details of age, height, weight, complexion, and 
mental ability, all of which details the writer sums 
up in the comprehensive term " profile." 

When one receives such an epistle, she almost 

feels that she has truly entered the literary realm, 

and that soon her autograph and photograph will 

become staple articles in the market. 

Thus my soon-to-be successor, 
Should you find yourself possessor 
Of a similar epistle, 



104 



Lasell Leaves. 



It will be but repetition 

Of an earlier edition 

From a well-known Southern college. 

Howsoe'er your name be shapen, 

It will always strangely happen 

That some one will soon discover 

His to be exactly like it ; 

And to you he '11 surely write it, 

With a Gamp-like " bragian " boldness. 

There are things less amusing which will prob- 
ably occur, especially before you are fairly en- 
tered upon your duties. But do not be discour- 
aged, even if you meet at almost every turn a 
friend who will inform you that yours is not an 
enviable position. Having exhausted what little 
talent we possess, we humbly surrender to those 
whom we hope will prove more efficient. 



It is but a small figure which indicates the 
sum total of Lasell's deficiencies, but three of the 
component parts of this figure seem to us quite 
necessary. 

The first, which reflects upon our name as patri- 
ots, is a picture of George Washington ; then, of 
course, that of Martha must follow. It was 
really sad to attempt the celebration of Feb. 22, 
without the presence of their faces among us. To 
be sure, we had good substitutes who partly com- 
pensated for the deficiency. 

The other two '• wants" are of local rather than 
national significance. First, we need a school 
song ; now that we are learning various songs, 
why not appoint a school poet to furnish us with 
one which shall be handed down from year to year, 
and be to us " a thing of beauty " and " a joy for- 
ever." The new military drill and the heroic strug- 
gles over " America" ought surely to inspire some 
one among us with a theme both loyal and brave. 

The last we scarcely dare to mention, but 
tremblingly suggest that the Lasell pin, which has 
heretofore united us only in mind, may soon appear 
in less shadowy form, and unite us as a body. 



Every little while we receive gentle suggestions 
from different members of the Faculty, that, if less 
time were spent in perusing the papers and maga- 
zines, a taste for better and more lasting reading 
might be acquired. We also find, with regret, 
that some of our home papers have lost their 
place in our library. 



But, like Rosa Dartle, we "ask for informa- 
tion," whether a liking for the most solid litera- 
ture is not obtained by first reading the best peri- 
odicals ? We contend that it is only the few who 
can plunge at an early age into any deeper 
depths of the world's problems than those repre- 
sented on the pages of our best magazines. These 
contain some of the very choicest current litera 
ture. A man's largest work, or that on which he 
has spent the most time, is not necessarily his 
best. It is said that when mental power is equal, 
that literary work is surest of immortality which 
occupies the least space. In periodicals the arti- 
cles are short, concise, brilliant, and therefore 
attractive. 

It is an actual fact, that in class-work, students 
will often fail to grasp the idea of an article, 
unless it be put in an interesting and attractive 
manner. The mind needs training in order to be 
able to discover abstruse and hidden beauties. 



SOME PHASES OF SOCEITY. 

Some months ago, any one passing through one 
of the busiest streets at the South End of Boston 
might have seen the sign (and, perhaps, it may still 
be seen there), " Meta — and Regular Physician." 
Of course, this would have impressed him, espe- 
cially if he were fresh from the study of the 
history and methods of advertising. He would 
have seen further example of the science of sign- 
making if he had happened to be going in the 
direction of the unpretentious shingle on which 
was printed, in assorted capitals, 



J I m dONoVaN DeLE- 
Rin POp CoRn. 



But both these signs seem aesthetic in the high- 
est degree, as compared with that of the " Seven 
Sutherland Sisters," or with the one which dis- 
plays the wardrobe of the poor little midget baby. 
But laying aside all question of external appear- 
ance, there is food for thought in the various 
motives which brought these signs into exist- 
ence, or not so much in the motives as in 
the effects which each was intended to produce. 



Lasell Leaves. 



105 






Each of the four seems to us typical. Each 
appeals to its own peculiar class of patrons, and 
the number of these can be predicted by an un- 
varying law of statistics. 

The first is hung out solely to attract the gaze 
of Mrs. Credulous and her numerous family. 
Mrs. Credulous is the dear lady who never enters 
into any conversation in which ' the Doctor" also 
is not speedily introduced. She gives the word 
the, preceding the title, that unconscious little 
emphasis with which many another woman says 
he, when referring to her husband. Is the measles 
raging in your family? Mrs. C. and all her chil- 
dren had " them " years ago ; and very " pretty " 
cases they presented, too, — something unique 
about each one of them. Are you speaking of pneu- 
monia ? She has that every season, and has it each 
time so abundantly that you blush with shame 
that you should have remembered even for a 
moment your one poor little commonplace attack. 
Nervous prostration is her specialty. Neuralgia 
and inflammatory rheumatism are but the diver- 
sions of her lighter moments. She always has 
"the latest new thing " in diseases, if not in bon- 
nets. She has tested every known form of powder, 
pill, and liquid medicine, and has so many times, 
in her " marvellous recoveries," monopolized the 
one chance out of a thousand, that you are 
sometimes tempted to wonder why she does not 
try the sole experience still left untried — dying. 

The poorly spelled and worse written pop- 
corn sign speaks its pathetic message straight to 
the sentimental hearts of all the Boffins who are 
old fashioned enough still to reside in the 
"Bower." But Mr. Wegg and other political 
economists, who know that poetry is a dearer com- 
modity than prose, are not to be deceived in that 
manner. They know, though just how they 
know is a secret kept carefully locked in their 
own breasts, that every apparently half-starved 
and evidently thin and shivering little seller of 
papers, matches, and pop-corn is in reality the 
opulent heir of some Back Bay family. The ex- 
planation, presumably, is that the prodigal son, as 
illustrated in the Sunday-school papers of these 
young scions, proved so attractive that they have 
started out thus early in life, in the hope of getting 
their full share of those delicious husks. Or, if 
that explanation prove unsatisfactory, take this : 



The little pop-corn stand is a Vatoldi restaurant 
on a modest scale ; and Mr. Stull (the proprietor 
who keeps in the shady background) is, in this 
case, the father of the young clerk. Explain it 
as you will, only don't forget that " there is 
wealth in the family." 

We have said that the Seven Sutherland Sisters 
and the midget baby appeal to two different classes 
of people. This is true, although the motive 
appealed to in both cases is the same, — nothing 
•higher than mere idle curiosity. However, there 
is a fundamental difference in the method of grati- 
fying this curiosity. In the one case, the people 
are willing to block the sidewalk and gaze openly 
at a "free show"; in the other, after looking 
carefully to the four points of the compass, to see 
that there chance to be passing no acquaintances 
who may take note of their apparent liking for 
the abnormal, they slip quietly into the "paid 
exhibition." Verily, when we consider the vast 
multitude who help to make up one or other of 
the social phases thus hastily discussed, we are 
tempted to cry out, "Which of us is wise; or 
which of us, being wise, is willing to allow his 
neighbor the inestimable privilege of being foolish ?" 

Composita. 



A ROMANCE OF THE LONE STAR STATE. 

In one of our Western States there is a little 
town called Palo Pinto (spotted pole), where the 
events of the story I am going to relate occurred. 

The settlements made by the pioneers were few 
and far between. This town, like most others 
during the Indian occupation of the State, re- 
sembled a fort rather than a dwelling for peaceful 
men. The entire place had a warlike aspect, and 
was continually on the lookout for Indians. The 
women and children knew how to use fire-arms as 
well as the men. 

Palo Pinto is a very beautiful town, built on a hill, 
and surrounded by hills, between which are level 
plains dotted over with fertile farms and groves of 
pecan, walnut, and oak. Even to-day some of 
the old Indian monuments and relics remain. 

I have in mind a house, a double log-cabin, 
weather-boarded ; in fact, quite a mansion for 
those days. To the back was a cellar dug in the 
ground, and a little log-cabin with dirt roof, which, 
I have been told, the Indians built. 



io6 



Lasell Leaves. 



One bright fall day the people were beginning 
to feel more secure than they had for some time, 
and the children were allowed to play out in the 
sun and breathe the fresh air. By the red brick 
chimney there stood a tall swing ; in it was a very 
pretty little girl about six years old, and wearing 
the homespun dress of the time. As she swung 
back and forth, humming in her childish voice a 
sweet old song, while her light curls waved in the 
soft breeze, she made a pretty picture. Her 
mother was sitting by the open window, with a 
shadow of care on her brow, because it had been 
announced by the scouts that a fresh Indian trail 
had been discovered ; but they assured the people 
that no immediate attack was to be feared. De- 
spite their assurances, Mrs. Parker could not con- 
ceal her anxiety. 

While the child was swinging and the mother 
sat knitting at the window, the awful cry, ' ' The 
Indians ! the Indians !" spread from door to door. 
And indeed the alarm proved to be only too well 
grounded. One of the white men had slain a red 
brave, and the warriors had come in their paints 
and feathers to be avenged. All the men were 
away, so Mrs. Parker had to care for the house. 
She hastened to close the doors, and had almost 
succeeded in doing this, when she thought of the 
peril of her darling child. She rushed to the door 
only to find herself face to face with the blood- 
thirsty savages, who immediately seized her. 

Meanwhile the men and soldiers of the town 
were in arms to meet the attack. A fearful en- 
counter ensued. The whites were either massacred 
or taken prisoners. Scarcely a man was left to tell 
the horrible story. When the Indians turned from 
the town they left it a mass of burning ruins. 

The poor mother, who had clasped her child to 
her bosom, and would not let it go, was struck 
down and scalped. The trembling Cynthia stood 
by, scarcely realizing in her terror that she was a 
motherless captive. The Indians tied her to a 
horse which they had stolen, and in this manner 
they travelled for a number of days, over prairies 
and through the narrow passes between the moun- 
tains blue with cedar. They paid little attention 
to the utter exhaustion of our poor little friend. 
But at last she reached a resting-place. In the 
western part of the country there is a beautiful 
stream flowing through a cave. On approaching 



this spot, one can scarcely discover the entrance ; 
in fact, it is like that of Tom Sawyer's. It is not 
a dark cave, but massive walls enclose a grassy 
place, which is shaded from the burning sun by 
huge oak-trees, and at night it is lighted by the 
stars — "lamps of heaven," in the Indian 
phraseology. 

Here in the banquet hall, as we now call it, the 
victorious warriors met the body of the tribe, who 
were waiting to hear them relate their adventures. 
The squaws, wrapped in their blankets, either 
listened to their stories, or examined, with glitter- 
ing eyes, some queer ornaments which had been 
brought from the sacked town ; a group of chil- 
dren were playing at one side. One of them would 
have attracted attention anywhere. He was 
about ten years old, and was a fine specimen of 
nature's children He was not playing in the dirt, 
like his little companions, but was examining a 
tomahawk, which one of the warriors had laid aside. 

A little bird came chirping into the room to a 
spring. Emanuleta watched it with vigilant eyes, 
and just as it was about to dip into the water, he 
seized a gun which was standing near by, and be- 
fore any one could deter him the bird was lying 
dead. The warriors were delighted with his ac- 
curate aim, but some of the old squaws shook their 
heads, and said he would be punished for his 
cruelty. 

After all was quiet again, Emanuleta sat regard- 
ing the pale face of little Cynthia, and appeared to 
be very much interested in her. Finally he got up, 
and went to the spring, where the fern was grow- 
ing, and where the cool water gushed out from the 
moss-covered wall. A tall elm-tree, with out-spread 
branches, shaded the spring. He took a gourd 
dipper, filled it with the clear water, and took it to 
the little captive. This was the first meeting of 
Emanuleta and Wah-ta-Wah, as she was called by 
the tribe. Thenceforth these children lived over 
again the wild, beautiful lives of Paul and Virginia, 
or rather such lives as the little Hiawatha and 
Laughing Water would have lived could one im- 
agine them as growing up together and minus the 
stern guardianship of old Nokomis. Doubtless if 
Besant could have observed their apparent satis- 
faction in each other, he would have found material 
for another social study more perplexing than that 
involved in " The Children of Gibeon." 



Lasell Leaves. 



107 



Ten years passed. The uncle of the lost child 
had never ceased to mourn her ; nor had the father 
retracted his vow of vengeance. But the maiden 
herself had only a faint remembrance of her home 
and friends. During all these ten years the In- 
dians had eluded all attempts at capture. 

At the feast of the Harvest Moon, a looker-on 
would have known that something unusual was to 
take place. Since Geronimo, the old chief, was 
dead, of course his son succeeded to the head of 
the tribe ; and it was in honor of his marriage that 
the extra preparations were made. 

The marriage rites were performed, and Wah-ta 
Wah became the loved squaw of the brave Eman- 
uleta. Eight weeks were allowed for the honey- 
moon (do Indians have a honeymoon ?),and then 
he was to say good by, and go on the war-path to 
make a name for himself, as his forefathers had 
done. The night before his leave-taking a crowd 
of Indians were performing their war-dance before 
their chief. At the height of the dance forms 
might have been seen moving stealthily among the 
trees. When the dance was over, and the camp 
was quiet, the only lights visible were the dying- 
blaze of the camp-fires. Then were heard from 
the trees cries like those of the loon and the 
panther. These were answered from different parts 
of the forest by the cries of other animals and 
birds ; then the whole forest seemed to be full of 
men. The alarm was spread throughout the Indian 
camp. The Indians, who were few when com- 
pared to the colonists, fell fighting bravely ; nor 
did they cease offering courageous resistance until 
every warrior lay dead, with his face towards the 
enemy. The foremost warrior was Emanuleta. 

At the early dawn the soldiers went to search 
for the missing Cynthia. They found a beautiful 
girl, with soft curling hair, and gentle, pleading 
gray eyes, kneeling over the body of the dead chief. 
She had changed greatly, but love told the parent 
that she was his child. As she turned her fright- 
ened face to her father, a flood of memory came 
over her, but nothing was distinct, except the burn- 
ing houses. The words, which finally came to her 
lips, " Me Cynthia, me Cynthia," completed her 
little remembrance of her early childhood. 

They took her from the body of Emanuleta back 
to the cave, to prepare her for her homeward jour- 
ney. Meanwhile the men had buried the bodies of 



the fallen warriors, with bows and arrows, and 
placed a rough stone at the head of Emanuleta. 

Cynthia was taken back to her home ; but she 
had lived too long that free, out-door life. After 
lingering a few weeks she went to join her chief in 
the hunting-grounds. 

Mr. Parker, her uncle, still lives in the county 
which bears his name. The leader, who was sent 
by the governor to recover Cynthia, was then 
scarcely known, save among troops, but to-day 
he is governor of the Lone Star State. 

L. T. C. 

» ♦-♦ 

DIAMOND HILL SCHOOL-HOUSE. 

In the memories of childhood nothing is more 
vivid, nothing sweeter, than this dear old school- 
house, where I first entered the path of knowl- 
edge. It still stands just as it did a score of 
years ago, at the foot of the hill, bearing the sig- 
nificant name, from the fireside story handed 
down from generation to generation, that here in 
days gone by the sparkling gem had been found. 

A small one-story building, with slanting roof 
and tiny chimney, through which the curl of smoke 
from the little round stove within escaped ; two 
great stone steps leading to the entry, one side of 
which was for the boys' caps and coats, the other, 
the girls', while beneath were the benches, where 
one might see a row of lunch baskets, carefully put 
up by the loving hands of the mother. 

It was roughly built within, a few small windows 
with smoky glass admitting a scanty supply of 
warmth and sunlight, but quite enough fresh air 
on a zero morning. In front stood a little plat- 
form, with its teacher's desk and two chairs, one 
of which was the terror of mischievous boys and 
girls, it being their punishment to sit by the 
teacher if she had found them guilty of any mis- 
demeanor. The rude desks and benches were 
placed about the sides of the room, and the stove 
in the centre completed the furnishings. Severe 
simplicity indeed, scarcely more than has nour- 
ished illustrious characters in history. 

To just this little humble school-house, when 
scarce five and a half years old, I came, tripping 
down the hill, hand in hand with my sister, in 
hieh "lee that I had become so advanced in life. 
It was yet very early in the fall ; the wild flowers 
had not all faded, and I plucked them along the 



io8 



Las ell Leaves. 



way " for my teacher." No lark was happier that 
morning or sang more gleefully than I in my de- 
light. The sun never seemed so bright, and the 
birds never sang so gayly ; but alas ! my good 
grandmother's fears of " high heels" proved true, 
and my joy was soon turned to grief. A " horrid 
mean " stone tripped me, and I fell, soiling my 
hands and clean white apron, and I came into 
school with head hung down and blushing face. 

Then I felt sure that those great boys were 
staring at me, and I was afraid to lift my eyes 
All too soon the tears came, and increased to piti- 
ful childish sobs. Nothing would comfort me : 
no words, no pictures, and my first day ended with 
a sorrowful returning home. I poured out all my 
griefs to my dollies, told them just how those 
ugly boys treated me, and they looked very indig- 
nant, and gave me all the sympathy I desired. 

Quite soon I went again, and this time the big 
girls took me under their protecting wing, gratify- 
ing me much by their attention, so that I soon 
grew to love school, and to feel badly when the 
weather or illness kept me at home. 

How well I remember the innocent sports of 
those days ; the rocks just in the school-yard, 
where we took our lunch and held grand feasts ; 
the princes and princesses that graced our table ; 
the sumptuous b.mquets that we prepared ! Then 
we had such good times gathering the wild straw- 
berries in the fields near by, and the whortleber- 
ries in their time. Then the frost came, and 
opened the chestnut burs ; there were the glossy 
brown nuts to gather. But the best fun came with 
winter. The hills resounded with the shouts and 
laughter of the school children as they whizzed 
over the glassy surface, making quite a fantastic 
scene with their gay-colored scarfs and hoods. 

It was all pleasure then ; and now, when years 
have passed and cares have come upon me, and 
each day I look into the faces of just such happy 
children, whose various temperaments, queer re- 
marks, and puzzling questions perplex me, my 
thoughts so often go back to my own childhood 
days, and my heart goes out in sympathy towards 
them as they go through the " how-I-was-edu- 
cated " period of their lives. 

Chancing to be of a summer near my early 
country home, I was permitted to revisit the 
" scenes of my childhood," to look again upon the 



little school-house, still unchanged through so 
many years. As of old, I travelled the familiar 
road, crossed the little bridge, with its gurgling 
stream beneath, passed the country farm-houses, 
where again and again a kind face had appeared 
with its hearty " Good morning, little girl " ; then 
a quick descent of Diamond Hill led to the dear 
old school-house, just Ihe same, with its steps and 
chimney, its uncurtained windows, its rough 
walls ; the same rocks, the same trees shaded it ; 
there were the very whortleberry fields, and 
there the little brook, where we filled our cups 
with pure cold water. The winter winds and 
storms have left their weather-beaten tracks upon 
it, but still it opens its doors each morning to the 
country children who are forming there just the 
associations which linger so sweetly in my memory. 

B. W. G. 



THF FATE OF A FLOWER. 

Far away in a corner of the great green-house 
the rosebud rejoiced in the sunshine and warmth. 
Daily it grew in strength and beauty, and at last 
the gardener plucked it. The poor rose sorrowed 
bitterly, but held up its proud head as it was 
placed carefully in the white paper and handed to 
the boy. Several times on the way home the lad 
looked in on the beauty, and at last wrapped it 
warmly in his thick coat. 

Its head began to droop, and soon is was uncon- 
scious. A few hours later it heard a sweet voice 
say, " Oh, my beautiful rose has revived ■ how 
pretty it is !" and -before the rosebud realized 
who had spoken it found itself the centre of an ad- 
miring group. 

" What are they saying? Am I going to a real 
party ?" Yes, it was going to a parly, and it grew 
happier each moment as it found itself on the way. 

It arrived at last. Everything was new and 
strange ; but how pleasant it all was — to be car- 
ried by the loveliest lady at the ball ! it seemed a 
very charm. 

Suddenly it heard a voice say, " Beware, Miss 
Rosebud ! life is not what it seems." Looking 
around, it discovered an old companion, a faded 
chrysanthemum. 

" Thank you," returned Miss Rosebud, haughtily ; 
and off it was whirled among the merry dancers. 

" What is my lady saying?" thought the rose- 



Lasell Leaves. 



109 



bud. " I must listen sharply. Did I not hear my 
name ?" 

" I will keep it always," said an earnest voice ; 
and the poor rose trembled, for it knew then that 
it would never again adorn the fair lady. The hours 
flew on, and the rosebud found itself being care- 
fully laid away in a little book of poems. How its 
pride fell ! 

The morning came, and again it heard voices — 
two deep voices. Miss Rosebud had heard them 
both the evening before. She remembered that 
her lady had danced with their owners, and each 
had whispered tender, loving words to her. Now 
one said, " She is pretty, no mistake about that ; 
but she has not one spark of sincerity." " No," 
said the other. " How much did she mean last 
evening when she gave me the rose, and said, with 
that smile, ' For you, and only you ' ? An hour 
later I heard her tell Jack, in the most concerned 
manner possible, that she had lost her flower, 
and could not imagine when or where she had 
dropped it." 

And so the conversation went on. What did 
they mean ? Could it be that her lady was un- 
true ? And why did they speak when with her of 
her charms, and then with scorn when she was ab- 
sent ? 

At last the rosebud slept — slept, never to wake 
again ; died, repeating softly to herself, " No, life 
is not what it seems "; and yet its " companion rose 
on the stem " at the green-house was the very one 
of which McDonald afterward wrote : " It had the 
highest honor ever paid to any flower : two lovers 
smelled it together, and were content with it." 

*•»■ 

THE EIGHTH WONDER OF THE WORLD. 

Such is the title applied to Seattle, the city of 
Puget Sound. It is a city of perhaps fifteen 
thousand inhabitants and wonderful activity. 

Possessing one of the finest harbors in the 
world, and being the terminus of the Northern 
Pacific R. R., its ultimate size can scarcely be 
estimated. At present, Seattle occupies the sides, 
summit, and base of a hill three hundred feet in 
height, and a mile in length, and of wonderful 
steepness. Real estate brings fabulous prices, 
lots twenty-five feet front selling from $10,000 to 
$25,000. The old buildings are mere shells, but 



fine brick blocks are being rapidly erected, and 
occupied as soon as finished. There are six 
churches, representing the Catholic, Methodist, 
Congregational, Presbyterian, Unitarian, and Epis- 
copal denominations. The saloons are said to 
number two hundred and ninety. There is one 
hotel of first-class pretensions, namely, the Occi- 
dental. 

At the termination of Noah's flood, the water 
supply above Seattle was not shut off, conse- 
quently it has rained ever since. The sun is 
visible twelve times a year. There has been one 
clay's sleighing since my arrival, and sleighs and 
snowballs flew incessantly while the snow lasted. 
Kvery one who dared venture out was snowballed 
without mercy, regardless of age, sex, or previous 
conditions of servitude. The snow, ten inches 
deep two days since, has entirely disappeared. 
The streets are filled with roughs, who hoot and 
howl at the feeble Salvation Army, which, however, 
holds a meeting every night. These meetings are 
verv late, from the fact that the leaders of the 
Army are cooks, and must finish their day's work 
before attending to the souls of their benighted 
brethren. 

Altogether, Seattle is a tpyical live town, 
busy, dirty, jolly, immoral, and of the g >ing- 
away-next-week aspect characteristic of Leadville. 
School teachers, clerks, musicians, etc., throng 
the place, and are unable to obtain work, while 
house servants cannot be had for love nor money. 
I have not been able to utilize my knowledge of 
shorthand ; in fact, have seen but few persons who 
know what it means. Alas ! we sadly lack the 
culture and learning which are acquired at Lasell. 

Belle Anderson. 



LASELL IN EUROPE, 1888. 

The elegant circular, which is descriptive of the 
tour planned for our girls this summer, is out, 
and the promises there made are rich and com- 
prehensive If any of you want to go, it will be 
difficult to find a more attractive programme for 
the time allowed. 

The date of sailing has been changed to June 
16, by Cunard steamer " Pavonia," from Boston. 
The trip will include the following places, in about 
the order given, allowing time in each for a 
good view of the principal attractions, carriage 



I IO 



Lasell Leaves. 



rides often, the best hotels, first-class everywhere 
on the cars and steamer, three meals a day; in 
fact, the very best of everything, everywhere, and 
good company all the way. We land at Liver- 
pool about June 25, thence to London, Rotter- 
dam, the Hague, Amsterdam, Antwerp, Cologne, 
the Rhine, Wiesbaden, Frankfort, Heidelberg, 
Munich, Linz, the Danube, Vienna, Venice, 
Florence, Naples, Vesuvius, Pompeii, Rome, 
Pisa, Genoa, Milan, Lake Como, Lugano, 
Locarno, St. Gothard Pass, the Rigi, Lucerne, 
Brunig Pass, Brienz, Giessbach, Interlaken, Grin- 
delwald, Lauterbrunnen, Lausanne, Vevay, Mar- 
tigny, Tetenoire Pass, Chamouni, Geneva, Paris 
London, Melrose, Abbotsford, Edinburgh, Stir- 
ling, the Scottish Lakes, Glasgow, returning 
to Liverpool and sailing for home on 30th of 
August, by the Cunard Line. 

Circulars and details furnished on application, 
which should be made very soon in order to 
secure choice rooms on the steamers. 

Address, W. T. Shepherd, 

Lasell Seminary, Anburndale, Mass. 



POLITICAL NOTES. 

The address sent to the Crown Prince from 
Berlin on the occasion of his thirtieth wedding 
anniversary contained no less than 180,000 signa- 
tures. It was most sumptuously gotten up, in a rich 
leather binding studded with precious stones, and 
artistically ornamented, the cover bearing the 
initials " F" and "V," surrounded by the imperial 
and municipal coat-of-arms. 

The new Chinese treaty, it is understood, ab- 
solutely prohibits the importation of Chinese 
laborers into this country. It permits any China- 
man who has made the United States his home 
and has acquired possession of property valued at 
$1,000 to visit China and return. This feature is 
expected to arouse the opposition of the Pacific 
Coast senators. 

The Italian, Austrian, and English governments 
have replied to Russia's proposals touching Bul- 
garia. They concur in the opinion that Prince 
Ferdinand's position is illegal, but they decline to 
take steps likely to disturb the peace of Bulgaria. 

Arrangements are being made for the open- 
ing of an "Irish. Village" in London, for the 



purpose of exhibiting Irish products in process of 
manufacture. The exhibition will be held in the 
site of the late Japanese Village, in connection 
with the Irish and Scotch cottage industries, and 
will be made under most distinguished patronage. 

The negotiations between France and Italy for 
a treaty of commerce have been put off. 



SCIENTIFIC NOTES. 
The sun crosses the equator, and spring begins 
on March 19 at n p. m. 

What is believed to be a meteorite has just been 
dug out of the ferry harbor of Hokjobing, in Den- 
mark. The stone, which weighs about half a ton, 
was found in soft mud, and no other stones were 
near it. It is very dark in color, contains iron, 
and is of unusual weight for its size, the work of 
moving it being very laborious. It has now been 
blasted into pieces, which will be examined scien- 
tifically. 

The terrible lessons taught by the railroad hor- 
rors of the past year have taken hold upon the 
public mind, as evinced by the safety-heating de- 
vices now flooding the market, designed to prevent 
fire in case of accident. A Chicago man has 
brought the proverbial Yankee ingenuity to bear 
upon the subject, and has evolved an indestructible 
stove. The stove was tested by dropping it from 
the top of a seven-story building into the street. 
It was not quite so symmetrical as before, but 
otherwise uninjured. 

It has been estimated that the amount of water 
passing into the Lake of Geneva is about eighteen 
hundred cubic feet per second. At this rate it 
would require about fifteen years for the river to 
fill with water the basin occupied by the lake. 



ART NOTES. 

The panorama of the Battle of Gettysburg, 
now on exhibition in New York City, is the third 
painted by M. Philippoteaux, who considers it the 
greatest effort of his life. Unlike the first two, 
it was painted in America, and is consequently 
more thoroughly American in its character. The 
portraits of the principal officers were in some 
cases studied from life. 

Mr. Thomas Nast, who has lately visited Col- 
orado, has been honored by having a hitherto 



Las ell Leaves. 



1 1 1 



nameless peak called after him. Mt. Nast is on 
the Colorado Midland Railroad, and is a com- 
manding feature of the Pike's Teak route. 

The late Mrs. John Jacob Astor left a collec- 
tion of old lace which she herself had gathered, 
buying most of the pieces in France and Italy, 
between 1845 and 1855. It is valued at be- 
tween $40,000 and $50,000, and has been pre- 
sented by Mr. Astor to the Metropolitan 
Museum of Art. 

The Lick Monument to Frances Scott Key, 
author of " The Star Spangled Banner," de- 
signed by N. W. Story, at Rome, has arrived at 
San Francisco. 

Munkacsy's latest work is a gigantic compo- 
sition for the adornment of the ceiling of the 
Historical Museum of Arts, at Vienna, to rep- 
resent the Apotheosis of the Renaissance. 

An exhibition of rather unique interest is the 
collection of drawings and engravings, some 350 
in number, by Hamilton Gibson, the well-known 
magazine contributor and illustrator. The exhi- 
bition will open in the American Art Galleries, 
March 14, to continue a week, and to conclude 
with a sale. 

The painting by Henry Orne Rider, called 
"Anxious Moments," which has been on exhi- 
bition at Williams & Everett's, in Boston, is now 
in the Seminary again. Four new water colors 
by the English artist, Thompson, have been 
recently added to the collection. Three of them 
are marines. The fourth is a scene in Epping 
Forest. 

MAJOR AND MINOR. 

Wagner came well to the front during the re- 
cent season of German Opera in New York, one 
half of the works presented having been by him. 

A few days ago Manager H. O. Abbey signed 
a contract with the father of Josef Hofmann, the 
wonderful boy pianist, by the terms of which the 
lad will give one hundred concerts, under the 
management of Abbey, Schoeffel, and Grau, next 
season. The new series will begin in October, 
and the tour will include this country, Mexico. 
Havana, and the large cities of Canada. The 
present Hofmann season will close in San Fran- 
cisco next May. The boy will not return home at 



the close of his engagement, as originally con- 
templated. He is delighted with America, and is 
looking forward with pleasurable anticipations to 
his summer's vacation. His sister will be sent 
for, and the family will take a cottage in some 
quiet place in the White Mountains, where they 
will spend the summer months. 

Berlin has just named a street in memory of 
Richard Wagner. 

Jenny Lixd's teacher, Herr Berg, who is 86 
years of age, still gives lessons in London. 

TEMPERANCE ITEMS. 
A W. C. T. U. has been organized at Huntsville, 
Texas. This is the only Christian association in 
the city or in that section of the country. 

The National Union has been organized twelve 
years. 

Sam Jones never misses to pour in hot shot for 
prohibition. At Lakeside, the other day, he told 
his audience of four thousand people: "To say 
prohibition does not prohibit in Atlanta is one of 
the Devil's blackest lies. I '11 give any one of you 
fifty dollars for every drink you can buy in my 
town ; and if you are 'short,' and would like to try 
it, I '11 pay your fare down there. I 've been mak- 
ing this offer for nigh unto two years, and had to 
pay only fifty dollars as yet. But I got the worth 
of my money out of that fifty dollars, for the fel- 
low who won it had to come into court and swear 
he bought the whiskey, and where he got it, and 
we have the fellow who sold it in prison." 



EXCHANGES. 

The minds of the different college editors 
must all be very great, if running in the same 
channel has anything to do with it, as there is 
always some article or bit of poety which seemingly 
enjoys the favor of all ; sometimes a really good 
thing, often a nonsensical jungle. A few charm- 
ing verses, entitled " Identity," from the Advocate, 
have recently enjoyed popular favor, and, not to 
be altogether behind the times, we give the last 
verse : — 

" Our actions on the world's stage tend 

To find a mark, to reach an end ; 

Yet in the broad immensity 

Of life — itself a tossing sea — 

They seem to lose identity." 



I 12 



Lasell Leaves. 



It is quite enough of a task to publish a 
paper once a month, and when the proof-sheets 
are really in, what a load is off the poor little 
chief's mind, — that is, for about a week until 
next month's work imperiously demands atten- 
tion ; but what will become of the boards of the 
Varsity and North Western is painful to contem- 
plate. They each issue a weekly magazine upon 
a par with many of the monthlies. Looking, 
during the examinations, for a pardonable de- 
crease in reading matter, we were most agreeably 
disappointed in both instances, as the papers 
have been, if anything, better than usual. 

The Dartmouth for this month, of course, is 
good, and the editorials particularly pointed ; tut 
could not at least two of those four pages of 
"Memoranda Alumnorum " be employed to bet- 
ter advantage ? 

We walked into the room of one of our asso- 
ciates the other day, and seeing the Phillipean 
adorning the wall about six feet from the floor, 
inquired the '' wherefore." She replied that the 
Phillipean needed elevating. Receiving the paper 
that evening, and glancing over its otherwise at- 
tractive pages, we thought it would be a good 
idea once in a while, say once a month, to start 
with, to have something, either an essay or story, 
in that paper. 

The King's College Record 'was laid down with 
regret, as the treat of reading its exceedingly inter- 
esting pages was over for this month, at least. The 
literary part of the Record is beyond criticism, and 
the only improvement that could be suggested is 
that the pink paper upon which the magazine is 
printed, although a very tasteful shade, is exceed- 
ingly trying to the eyes. 

Among the numerous good things in the Bates 
Student, the article on " Nature and Art " is decid- 
edly the best. As the author truly says, — 

" Artlessness is the greatest of arts." 



FEBRUARY 22. 
The fancy dress party which took place on the 
evening of the 22d was a grand success. The 
gymnasium was artistically trimmed, thanks to 
the industrious Seniors. Every one looked her 
best — or her worst. There was no half-way 
work about it. 



George and Martha Washington received and 
gave a cordial greeting to all. A small boot- 
black was seated near the stately George, offering 
in a most engaging manner " A shine for only five 
cents." 

Among the distinguished guests were two cow- 
boys fresh from the West, a Turkish princess from 
the East, and four darkies up from the South. 

Night and day danced gayly together, and won 
the hearts of several cavaliers. 

Gypsy queens planned happy futures for all. 

John Alden and Priscilla, of Plymouth, gazed 
on the scene with prim disapproval. 

A general, with his sword and buckler, endeav- 
ored to k«ep the girls in order. 

All was going merrily when a bugle call was 
heard, and a band of travellers appeared, led by an 
organ-grinder and his monkey. The usual num- 
ber of beggars and tramps fo 1 lowed. The Suth- 
erland Sisters came last, with their flowing hair and 
dazzling complexion. 

With music and dancing, the evening passed 
pleasantly, and it was not until the half past nine 
bell rung and darkness fell upon us, that we 
realized the fact that our revels must come to an 

end. 

*-*-« 

LOCALS. 

" And the spring comes slowly up this way." 

The latest Leap Year greeting, " Ich liebe 
dich ! " Call at No. 37 for translation and further 
particulars. " Where ignorance is bliss," etc. 

Why does Minneapolis object to the reading of 
the Bible in the public schools ? Because it men- 
tions St. Paul, and not Minneapolis. 

" Choice Bits." Professor. — " Name some hot 
springs near the Sea of Galilee. 

Yonng Attentive. — " Siloam." 

Professor. — "By cool Siloam's shadv rill ! " 

The snow came with no moon. The moon 
came with no snow. The sleigh-ride never came ! 

" Our sewing-machine has the very latest im- 
provement : runs without a bobbin, has a tension 
instead." 

Brilliant Junior. — " Don't charge me with 
electricity: I intend to enter free." 

" In the spring a young girl's fancy lightly 
turns to thoughts of dress." 



Lasell Leaves. 



113 



The present officers of the Lasellia Club are as 
follows : President, Miss H. White ; Vice Presi- 
dent, Miss M. Raum ; Secretary, Miss Lee ; 
Treasurer, Miss Day ; Critic, Miss Harris ; Guard, 
Miss D. Fowler; Assistant Guard, Miss Reed; 
Executive Committee, Mi s Mathews. Miss Gray, 
and Miss A. Gardner. 

The star of the ancient history class has set, 
and the brilliancy of the United States history 
class shines forth. Listen. 

To say that we were delighted to have Judge 
Parks visit us again would be expressing but half 
of what is in our hearts. He gave us a half- 
hour's talk, and very short half-hour it was too ! 
After dinner he held a little reception in the par- 
lor for his old Lasell friends. 

A list of pleasures : The Irving and Terry 
reading of Feb. 15 was enjoyed by many of the 
girls. The Waltham Watch Works were visited 
Feb. 27, and a few fortunate girls attended the N. 
H. S. drill on the 2 2d. 

Night by night that fiend of music 

Sat within her chamber small, 
Night by night the sounds came floating, 

Floating gayly down the hall, 
Till at last upon a midnight 

Came a knock upon that door, 
And that music-box was silenced, 

Silence kept forevermore. 

The Lasell method of teaching elocution is 
evidently not appreciated by the French. We 
have one Annex, why not have another in the 
shape of a lunatic " Institution " ? It would save 
" some people's " feelings, to say the least. 

On the morning of the 22d, Prof. F. H. Bailey- 
gave two lectures on astronomy. A large trans- 
parent globe of the heavens stood upon the plat 
form, and the various constellations of the northern 
and southern hemispheres were traced upon it. 
The first lecture showed the different positions of 
the earth in its daily and yearly revolutions. In the 
second lecture the reasons for the variations in 
length of day and night were explained. The lec- 
turer ended by the poetry of the heavens as given 
by writers of all ages. 

Some one asks for a remedy for this irresistible 
desire to converse after 9.30 p. m. Every means 
has failed so far. We suggest a dose of Broma 
Caffine. 



A very novel entertainment for Lasell was 
given by the S. D. Society, on the evening of 
March 10. It was a concert by the Wesleyan 
Glee Club, and all pronounced it " the event of 
the season." After the concert, the S. D 's 
received in the parlors. 

The programme was as follows : — 

PROGRAMME. 



1. WEIMAR . 

2. LITTLE DOG 



Liszt 
Wesleyan Songs 



WHISTLE. 

3. SEA HATH PEARLS* Camfi 

4. DAYLIGHT College Songs 

5. MEDLEY IVes'eyan oor/gs 

6. WALTZ Lamothc 

PART II. 

OLD KING COAL hides 

TALE OF WOE College Songs 

CREDO Glee 

IN ABSENCE Buck 

R. R. R. (ascents) Paine 

SCHNIDER College Songs 

SOLO, MR. GRIFFIN. 

7. GoOD NIGHT Buck 

Wednesday evening, March 7, Rev. Francis 
Tiffany gave an interesting lecture on Venice. 

It was a kind thought of Mabel Williams to 
send a whiff of Florida's fragrant orange groves 
up into our New England March. We all enjoyed 
it, and send many a grateful thought to her, with 
regret for her loss from among us by this en- 
forced vacation. 

To My Girls: 

Mr. Shepherd's itinerary for 1888 seems to me very 
desirable and delightful. It takes the cream of Central 
Europe. 

The conductor who will be with the party from start to 

finish is one of the best in Europe. The Bo-ton Cunard 

boats are the most comfortable on the ocean, and have the 

best people as passengers. Lasell people of recent years 

need no guarantee that Mr. and Mrs. S. will do all that is 

promised, and more. For those who do not know them, I 

offer my guarantee. I am getting too old to take young 

people over Europe. So go with Mr. Shepherd and take 

my blessing. 

Your friend, 

C. C. Bragdon. 
After the lecture : — 

Learned Damsel. — u That man read the ' Rise 
of Venice ' just as if it was the r-i-c-e of it." 

Electric lights in the chapel, library, and halls. 



* Composed for and dedicated to Wesleyan Club, 



ii4 



Lasell Leaves. 



PERSONALS. 

The old girls were glad to have Lizzie Atwater 
with them again, though it was only for a few 
days. She spoke of her mission school. Oh, to 
be one of her scholars ! 

Miss Jennie and Miss Jessie Flint came back 
to see their friends for a few days. It seemed 
like old times to see them with us, and we hope to 
see them again very soon. 

Miss Ada Langley made Lasell a little visit 
March 3. 

Mamie Congden and her mother are spending 
the winter at Aiken, S. C. 

We see Sue Stearns here quite often. We are 
glad that she still remembers us. 

Thursday, Feb. 16, was a red-letter day. 
Irene Sanford made a very pleasant little call. 
She looks well, and talks " prosperously." In 
the afternoon met Lena Tidd in the New York 
and New England station. The very same Lena. 
She, with her parents, returned in October, but 
is anxious to go again. She says Stella 
Toynton is in Europe yet, but Jennie Wilbur has 
returned. Just after, in Broad Street, Emma 
Cardell Clarke and her clear little girl ; I guess 
she 's six years old, I know she is a sweet-looking 
child. Emma is " keeping " well, and says Lou 
Barker Worcester is in Washington now, but 
soon to be back in Boston, when she promises to 
bring her out to see the " new Lasell." 

Sarah Burk Proctor has returned from her 
home in England and settled at Millbury. 

Anna Curtis Beaver's little girl is called 
Olive. 

Bernice Langworthy McFadden, here in 
1876, hopes soon to visit Lasell friends, for whom 
there is always a very warm corner in her heart 
The number of her home in Baltimore is changed 
to 16 1 1 John Stieet. Dear Mrs. Langworthy still 
cares for the two little children of Carrie Glover 
Langworthy, her daughter-in-law. but is in her 
old home in Dubuque, Iowa. 

Twenty pictures recently purchased for the 
Seminary have arrived here safely by Witte's 
agency from Berlin They combine valuable ori- 
ginals by Professor Meyer, of Bremen ; Stade 
mann, Tillnayr, and Gall, of Munich ; Graeb, 
Hoynet, Von Hafften, Kay, Schraybach, Hend- 



rich, and Wilberg, of Berlin ; also very valuable 
sepia drawings by Simeon, Fort, and Fritz, and a 
landscape by David Vinckelboore, a celebrated 
painter in the Netherlands. Further details will 
be given in the next number. 

Mr. Hill says that he has never enjoyed teach- 
ing at Lasell so much as he does this year. 

Mr. Alfred Hemenway, our lecturer on law, 
has declined an offer of a seat on the Supreme 
Bench on account of the illness of his wife. The 
governor's tender of the honor was a suprise to 
him. 

Bertha Morrisson has met with a great loss in 
the death of her father, Mr. Robert Morrisson, of 
Chicago, 111. He died March 6, after an illness 
of four weeks. He was honored and beloved, 
commanded high respect as one of the sterling 
business men of Chicago, and his death will be 
widely felt. 

Since October, May Clarke, in her home at 
Trappe, Md., has been in great sorrow, on account 
of the very distressing and hopeless illness of her 
father, who is now apparently lying at the point of 
death. Her many friends here desire to express 
their deep sympathy for her. 

Sophie F. Crandon, who was a Lasell girl in 
1882, is now in Thomasville, Georgia. 

Miss Maude Newcomb and her friend, Miss 
Day, made Lasell a little visit Feb. 13. Maude 
was very enthusiastic over the improvements made 
since she was here as a student, in 1879. 

Miss Lufkin is continuing art studies in New 
York. 

Miss Alice E. Thayer's many friends here re- 
joice in the good news that she is regaining her 
health. May we see her again at Lasell ! 

A former Lasell girl, Miss Lula Devnell, was 
one of the sweet young ladies who tendered me such 
a beautiful compliment — to use Mrs. Cleveland's 
words — "at Jacksonville, Florida." 

A bevy of these accompanied Mrs. Cleveland and 
the party to the receiving parlors and stood near 
her. "What did they wear?" Oh! Our girl 
wore "heliotrope ottoman silk, brocaded skirt, 
feather trimmings and diamonds," according to 
Jacksonville reporters. 

Hora M. Greenough, crayon artist, Beacon 
Street, Newton Centre. Miss Greenough has the 



Lasell Leaves. 



US 



good wishes of Lasellians for her success in a 
work for which she has taste and talent. 

Miss Helena Pfau is attending school in New 
York. 

Kitty Youngs isather home in Summit, N. J., 
this being within convenient distance of New York. 
She is taking lessons there in music and painting. 

Pleasant letters have recently been received 
from Jessie Godfrey, of Pittsburg, Pa. ; Mrs. Al- 
bert L. Gould (Grace White) . now of 194 Lark 
Street, Albany, N. Y. ; Mrs. E. W. Lewis (Nellie 
Parker), now of 186 Webster Street, East Boston, 
Mass. ; and May Clark, of Trappe, Maryland. We 
are glad to hear you often think of the " old home," 
and when you find time to make the promised visit 
you may be assured of a hearty welcome. 

Miss Lida Curtis is well and happy at her 
home in Hoboken, N. J. 

Miss Mabel Bliss has been visiting friends in 
Boston. We are glad that she did not forget the 
Lasell friends, who are always ready to welcome 
her. 

Laura Munger is housekeeping at home, and 
continuing studies in German literature. 

A long-contemplated school album of auto- 
graphs has at last been completed, and is open 
for examination by the pupils. It is naturally of 
especial interest to the classes in literature. We 
will not mention the names gathered. A number 
are well known. to us all, loved and honored. 
Some English names of Shakespearian scholars, as 
F. H. Heard, F. G. Fleay, Daniel, Collier, 
Ingleby, and Staunton, are much less familiar. 
This book will help us to an acquaintance with 
them ; and some German scholars also, as Elze, 
Leo, Schmidt, and Snider. For these and many 
others we are indebted to our Shakespearian teach- 
er, Prof. W. J. Rolfe. Indeed, without his help the 
album could hardly have existed, and it is fitting 
to give thus publicly our grateful tribute of thanks 
to him. 



Married, in Providence, R. I., Feb. 22, 1888, 

Miss Jennie B. Goff and Mr. Frederick R. Martin. 

At home, after March 21, at 9 Princeton Avenue, 

Providence. 

«-♦-» 

LASELL'S GRANDCHILDREN! 

Will former pupils please send photographs of 
their children as may be convenient ? We are 
making an album for the little folks. Write full 
name and date of birth on the back. 



C. C. B. 



AMATEUR PHOTOGRAPHIC OUTFITS, 

All Eizen : ; r.i Styles at Lowest Fri:ea. 

BENJ. FRENCH & CO. 

319 Washington Street - - Boston, Mass. 



SHREVE, CRUMP k LOW, 



4^2 WASHINGTON ST. 



BOSTON. 



°\)! / at cries, ^u i amends, 
(j ewelr y, 

Miriest lottery. 




JOSEPH Q! LLOTT5 

1 SaiEEL Pt&trJ^® 

THE FAVORITE NUMBERS, 303,404, 332,351, 170, 

AND HIS OTHER STYLES 

SOLD by ALL DEALERS throughout toe WOKL&) 




n6 



Lasell Leaves. 



FRENCH 

SHIRTINGS. 



Cheviots, 

Madras, 

English & 

French 

Flannels 

& Silk 

Shirtings, 



Far Tennis, 

" Bailwajj Gar, 

" Steamer Trav- 
" elling, 

" Hunting, 

" Pishing, 

" Yachting. 

Always in stock or 

made to special 

measure. 



NOYES BEOS. 

Washington and Summer Sts. 

BOSTON, U. S. A, 



London Tan Street Gloves, warranted, at 
$1.35, at Noyes Bros. 

Dress Shirts, for Weddings, for Receptions, 
for Dinner Parties, with Collars, Cuffs, and 
Cravats, in the latest English styles. Plain 
French Bosoms, fine Embroidered Spots, 
Figures and Cords, at Noyes Bros. 

English Cheviots, English and French Flan- 
nels, Silk and Wool and Pure Silk Shirt- 
ings, for Tennis, for Steamer Travelling, 
for Hunting and Fishing, for Railway and 
Yachting. Always in stock or made to 
special measure, at Noyes Bros. 

English Mackintosh Coats, for Ladies and 
Gentlemen, at Noyes Bros. 

English Rugs and Shawls, for Steamer and 
Railway use, at Noyes Bros. 

English Flannel, Blanket and Shawl Wraps, 

for the Sick-Room, for Steamer and Railway 
Travelling. For the bath and house use they 
are indispensable. $3.25 to $65.00. 

English Neckwear, at Noyes Bros. 



Underwear and Hosiery, in Pure Silk, Lambs' 
Wool, Merino, Balbriggan and English Cotton, 
for early fall wear, at Noyes Bros. 

English Flannel Pajamas, Long Flannel 
Night Shirts and Wraps, for steamer and rail- 
way travelling, at Noyes Bros. 



Full Evening Dress Shirts, 
Collars and Cravats 

Constantly on hand, for Dinner Parties, 
Weddings , or any occasion. 

The present English Fashion of shirts made 
with Linen Cords and Spot Bosoms may be 
had of Noyes Bros. 



ENGLISH-DRESSING GOWNS, 

JACKETS AND WRAPS. 



Lawn Tennis Shirts, Coats and Hose. 



TENNIS BELTS AND CAPS in Stock and 
made to measure from choice styles of ENG- 
LISH .FLANNELS. 

GLOVES of Every Description, for Dress, 

Street, Driving, and the famous London Tan, 
at $1.35, at Noyes Bros. 



JURORS' AWARD for beauty of work- 
manship and design, and distinguished 
excellence in the manufacture 
of Shirts, to 

NOYES BEOS. 

Wash in v ton and Summer Streets, 
BOSTON, U. S. A. 



ESTABLISHED 1817. 



JOHN H. PRAY, SONS & CO. 

Importers, Jobbers, Retailers and Manufacturers' Agents 

Carpetings, Mattings, Oil Cloth, 

ORIENTAL RUGS, 

CARPETS AND UPHOLSTERY. 



558 and 560 Washington St., 

30 to 34 Harrison Ave. Extension, 



BOSTON. 



113 Worth Street 



NEW YORK. 



Las ell Leaves. 



1 17 



A. STOWELL & CO. 

24 Winter Street, Boston. 



£oirie of our Specialties : 

Bohemian Garnet Jewelry. 

Amber Beads and Ornaments. 

Tortoise-Shell Hair Pins. 

Choice Leather Goods. 

Oxidized Silver Jewelry. 

Fans for all occasions. 

Pearl Opera Glasses. 

Fine Gold Jewelry. 

Wedding Presents in Clocks, Vases and 
Bronzes. 

LATEST NOVELTIES IN ALL DEPARTMENTS. 
Lowest Prices. 



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YOUNG LADIES' 

BOOTS, SHOES AND SLIPPERS, 

Stylish and Durable at Moderate Prices. 

GYMNASIUM SHOES A SPECIALTY. 

Thayer, McNeil & Hodgkins, 



47 TEMPLE PL 



BOSTON. 



ARTHUR P. SCHMIDT & CO. 

IMPORTERS OF AND DEALERS IN 

FOREIGN AND AMERICAN 

Sheet Music. 

Sole Agents lor Litolffs Celebrated Edition of 
Classical and Modern Music. 

13 AND 15 WEST ST., BOSTON. 

Catalogues sent free on application. 

BOSTON" FOREIGN BOOK STORE, 

BOOKS IN ALL FOREIGN LANGUAGES, 

CARL SCHOENHOF, 

144 Tremont Street - - - - One Plight Up. 



C. B. Woods. 



H. J. Wood. 



C. B. WOODS & CO, 



MANUFACTURERS OF 



Fine Furniture, 

Upholstery, Draperies, Wood Mantels 
and Interior Finish. 

OFFICE ANT) WAREROOMS, 

105 and 107 Chauncy Street, Boston. 



JOHN J. O'BRIEN, 

Picture Frames 

Of Every Description, Wholesale and Retail. 

OLD IF 1 IR, J^ ZMI IE S EEGILT. 

69 CORNHILL, BOSTON. 



ESTABLISHED IS-4-O- 



Isaac Locke & Company, 

Produce Commission Merchants, 

A nd Dealers in 

FOREIGN and DOMESTIC FRUITS 

97, 99 and 101 Faneull Hall Market, and Basement 18 south Side, 

BOSTON - - - MASS. 

4SF" Telephone Connection. 



u8 



Lasell Leaves. 



^WEBERSx 



25, 27 TEMPLE PLACE 



BOSTON, 



.AND 33 WEST STREET, 

Ladies' and Gents' Restaurant, 

Oysters and Salads a Specialty. 

OPEN AFTER THEATRES. 

Caterer for Wedding Breakfasts, Lunches, Dinner and Evening Parties 

and Receptions. Also, Club Suppers at Short Notice 

and Reasonable Prices. 

S. w7 BAILEY," 

— DEALER IN — 

WATCHES, JEWELRY, SILVERWARE, ETC. 

353 Washington Street, Boston. 

Jewelry Neatly Repaired. Also, Monograms on Coin Pieces. Personal 
Attention given to Repairing Fine Watches. 

ESTABLISHED 1847- 



AARON R. GAY & CO. 

No. 122 State Street, Boston", 

STATIONERS 



AND 



BLANK BOOK MANUFACTURERS, 



First-Class Account Books of any desired 
pattern made to order. 

S. S. GAY. EDWIN W. GAY, 

JUST WHAT HAS BEEN WANTED, 

A LADIES' LUNCH ROOM 

HAS BEEN OPENED AT 

23 AVON STREET, BOSTON. 

A quiet, neat place, where a nice Lunch can be had at a very reason- 
able price. All the ladies say, " Is n't it nice ? " 

T. D. COOK, Caterer. 

ALSO, 

Wedding and other Parties 

Served with the Choicest Viands, and by Competent Waiters. 

SUPERIOR ICE-CREAM 

DELIVERED AT REASONABLE PRICES. 



-3- 



THE- 



-~&* 



YOUTH'S COMPANION, 

A WEEKLY PAPER FOR 

YOUNG PEOPLE and the FAMILY, 

It aims to be a favorite in every family — looked for eagerly 
by the young folks, and read with interest by the older. Its purpose is to 
interest while it amuses; to be judicious, practical, sensible, and to have 
really permanent worth, while it attracts for the hour. 

It is handsomely illustrated, and has for contributors some of 
the most attractive writers in the country. 

Subscription Price, $1.75. Specimen copies sent free. Please 
mention in what paper you read this advertisement. 

PERRV MASON &, CO. 

41 TEMPLE PLACE, BOSTON, MASS. 



FINE FURS. 

The best quality of all kinds of Furs in fiopnla?- use. 

Seal English Jackets, 

Seal Dolman Wraps. 

Seal Sacques. 

We give particular attention to orders by measure, and using the 
richest and most durable of genuine Alaska Seals, assure the fullest 
satisfaction in quality and fit. 

The fashionable 

BLACK BEAR BOAS, 

of exquisite fineness and beauty, made from skins of rare quality. 

Fur Collars, Capes, Cuffs, Boas, 

Hats, Sleighing Hoods and Gloves 

FUR TRIMMINGS. 

Gentlemcris Fur-lined Overcoats. 

Fur Mats and Carriage Robes. 

Joseph A, Jackson, 



412 Washington Street 



Boston. 



Established 1825. 

NATHAN NEAT & CO. 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

-••-^o^k^- ZEnilLSriL! -i*>'0&^*- 

TIES Al TRAVELLING BAGS. 

BASKET TRUNKS AND STEAMER CHAIRS. 
Stateroom and Light-Weight Trunks for European Travel. 



SEND FOR ILLUSTRATED CATALOGUE. 



556 WASHINGTON ST., BOSTON, MASS. 

iLffiAIT FURNITURE 

At Popular Prices. 



F. M. HOLMES FURNITURE CO., 

116 TREMONT ST., BOSTON, MASS. 



LEVI S. GOULD. 



FRANK A. PATCH. 



Lasell Leaves. 



119 



EDWIN C. BURT & CO/S Mr. JOSEPH A. HILLS 

FINE SHOES AND SLIPPERS 



ha§ removed to more commo- 
dious music rooms in 



FOR LADIES AND CHILDREN 

ARE THE BEST SHOES MADI 



Fit Perfectly. 
Easy on the Feet, 
Superior in 



Cost no More 

Than any Other 

Fine Shoes. 




HOTEL PELHAM, 
Cor. Tremont and Boylston Sts., 

BOSTON, MASS., 

where he will be pleased to meet 
his pupils and others for pro- 
fessional engagements. 

Competent assistants under Mr. 
Hilis's supervision will attend to 
the instruction of those less ad- 
vanced who may desire lessons 
at reduced rates. 



For sale by leading retail shoe dealers in nearly every city throughout the United States and 
Canada. All widths of Lasts, any style of Shoe, Sole, Toe, or Heel. If you cannot 
get our make of shoes from your dealers, send address for directions how to procure them. 

EDWIN C. BURT & CO., Manufacturers, 

ItTIErW" YORK. 

SPECIAL AOENTS IN BOSTON, 

Jordan, Marsh & Co., Washington St. 



Conductors, Concert, Opera and 
Church Singers, Pianists, Organ- 
ists, Accompanists and Teachers 
supplied at the 

MUSIC TEACHERS' BUREAU 

HOTEL PELHAM, 

BOSTON, MASS. 



CONOVER BROTHERS' CO. 
piapofort^/Tlapufy 

14th St. and 9th Ave., New York. 

Clear, silvery, even tone through- 
out. Durable and elegant design. 
Indorsed by the profession. 

BOSTON WAREROOMS, 

Hotel Pelham. 



THE "PEERLESS" FOUNTAIN PEN 




IS THE PERFECTION OF FOUNTAIN PENS. 

Is a hard rubber holder fitted with a 16 k. gold pen of the best manufacture, and will never wear out. It will write ten thousand words with one 
filling of ink, and for taking lectures, etc., it is indispensable. There is no loss of time in dipping ink as with the ordinary pen, as the " Peerless " 
has a perfect, even and uninterrupted flow of ink, and is the best fountain pen manufactured. Price, $'3.00. 

The Cross Stylographic Pen, Stylographic Ink. All styles of Stylographic, Fountain, and Gold Pens repaired. 



THE CROSS PEN CO., 306 Washington St. 



BOSTON, MASS. 



1TEXT XJOOX3. TO ©LTD SOTTTH CIXTTSeCIT. 



120 



Lasell Leaves. 



C. H. CODMAN & CO. 

Photographic Material, 

PICTURE and FRAME DEALERS' 

«1 SUPPLIES O 
Wkolesale and Retail Framing 

AMATEUR PHOTOGRAPHIC APPARATUS. 

34 BROMFIELD STREET, 

BOSTON - - - MASS. 

W. H. FRENCH & CO. 

PLUMBERS, GAS FITTERS, 

■ — AND 

SANITARY ENGINEERS. 

JUDSON'S BUILDING, OPP. RAILROAD STATION, 
WEST NEWTON. 



All Work Promptly Attended to and Warranted Satisfactory. 



LIVERY, HACK. 



J±NT> 



BOARDING STABLE. 

ESTABLISHED 1861. 

S. F. CATE, WEST NEWTON. 



Barge " City of Newton." 

Boat Sleigh "Snow Bird." 

H. H. NEWELL, 

DEALER IN 

BOOTS, SHOESI RUBBERS, 

Auburn Street, Auburndale, Mass. 



New York and Beyond, 

via FALL RIVER LINE. 



ONLY $3 FOR FIRST-CLASS LIMITED TICKETS. 



SPECIAL EXPRESS leaves Boston from Old Colony Station daily 
(Sundays excepted) at 6 p. m., connecting at Fall River (49 miles) in 75 
minutes with the steamers Bristol and Providence. Heated throughout 
by steam and lighted by electricity. An orchestra on each steamer. Due 
to arrive in New York about 7.30 a. m; connection to Brooklyn and Jersey 
City by annex boat. Returning, leave New York daily (Sundays ex- 
cepted) at 4.30 p. m. Baggage checked from hotel or residence in Boston 
to destination. Tickets, State-rooms, etc., secured at the Line office, No. 
3 Old State House, and at the Old Colony Station. 



L. H. PALMER, 

Agt., 3 Old State House. 



J. R. KENDRICK, 

General Manager. 



House and. Sign. Painters, GTazing, Grraining, 
Kalsomining and "Whitening. 

Paints, Oils and. Varnishes constantly on hand. 

WASHINGTON ST. (near R. R. Crossing), WEST NEWTON. 

C. T. Allen. D. Barry. 

H. H. HUNT, 

CARPENTER AND BUILDER, 

WEST NEWTON, MASS. 
Shop near R, E. Crossing, P. 0. Box 235. 

WAPH % PR CARRIAGE AND WAGON BUILDERS, 

W A1UJ (X UUi, Cor. Elm and "Washington Sts., near City Hall, 

WEST NEWTON-. 

Fine Carriages and Wagons of any description built to order and War- 
ranted to give satisfaction. Carriage Painting and Repairing in all its 
branches promptly and thoroughly executed at fair prices. The Repair- 
ing of Fine Carriages a Specialty. 

Carriages Sent for and Returned Free of Charge. 

Boston Gossamer Rubber Co. 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

Gossamer Clothing. 

LEATHER COATS AND VESTS, 

HOOP-SKIRTS AND BUSTLES. 

611 Washington St,, Boston, Mass. 

S. KLOUS, Treasurer. 

B. G. BAKER, 

COAL AND WOOD, 

Auburndale and West Newton. 



Lasell Leaves. 



THOIAS HALL, 

MAOTFACTUBINOr 

Electrician 

— AND~— 

Optician. 

Manufacturer and Importer of 

Telegraphic, Electric, Mag- 
netic, dalvanic. Optical 
and Meteorological 
Instruments. 

Chemicals, Chemical and Philo- 
sophical Appnrutus ofaliDescrip- 
tions. Illustrated Catalogue of 
each Department. 

Hall's Pat. Medical Batteries. 
19 BItOMFIELD ST., BOSTON, MASS. 

1S35, Daniol Davis, Jr. 1849, Palmer & Hall, 1356, Thomas Ball. 

V/ADSWORTH & PICKERING, 

COMMISSION MERCHANTS, AND JOBBERS IN 

BUTTER, CHEESE, EGGS, ETC. 

STALL, 89 QUINCY MARKET, BOSTON. 




Briggs Wadsworth. 



F. A. Pickering- 



CHARLES H. WHITING, Formerly Hall k Whiting, 

STATIONER and BLANK BOOK MANUFACTURER 

Importer and Jobber. Publisher and Book Seller. School and Miscel- 
laneous Books. Crane's Fine Stationery. American, English, French 
and German Fancy and Staple Stationery. Weston's Ledger Papers. 

163 and 170 Devonshire Street, Bost:n. 



FROST & ADAMS, 

Importers of, and Wholesale and Retail Dealers In 

ARTISTS' MATERIALS, 

DECORATIVE ART NOVELTIES, ART 
POTTERY, ETC. 



Ebonized Panels. 

Winsor & Newton's Colors. 

German Colors. 

French Colors. 

Tucker & Green's Colors. 

Sketch Blocks. 

Plaques of all kinds. 

China Colors. 

Mirrors for Decorating. 

Artists' Boxes. 

Artists' Brushes. 

Artists' Canvas. 

Handbooks on Art. 

Studies of all kinds. 

Lustra Painting Materials. 



Water-Colors. 

Bronzes. 

Brocades. 

Spangles. 

China for Decorating. 

Paper Panels. 

Tambourines. 

Repousse Materials. 

Canvas Stretched. 

Drawing Instruments. 

Plaque Rims. 

Artists' Easels. 

Drawing Paper. 

Materials for Tapestry, etc. 

Kensington Painting Materials. 



SCHOOLS fp STUDENTS SUPPLIED 

AT LOW FIGURES. 

37 CORNHILL - - BOSTON. 

SEND FOR A CATALOGUE. 
F. S. Frost. H. A. Lawrence. 



ELLIOT W. KEYES, 

APOTHECARY, 



Raskins' Block - 

auburndale, 



Auburn Street, 

MASS. 



FALL AND WINTER MILLINERY. 

MRS. M. H. KIMBALL., 

Dealer in FRENCH FLOWERS, HATS, BONNETS and TRIMMINGS, 

MELROSE STREET, AUBURNDALE. 

V. A. PLUTA, 
Dealer in PROVISIONS, 

Cor. Auburn and Lexington Streets. 

ALFRED BR U S H , 

APOTHECARY, 

Plummer's Block, Cor. of Auburn and Lexington Sts. 

auburndale. 
n. w. farley. g. d. harvey. a. c. farley. 

FARLEY, HARVEY & CO. 

Importers and Jobbers of 

ID^S"3T • O-OOJDS. 

61 and 67 Ckiinccj, 39, 41 and 43 Bedford Sts., BOSTON. 

FARNUM &. COMPANY, 
PRODUCE COMMISSION MERCHANTS, 

Wholesale Dealers in Apples, Potatoes, Cranberries, Onions, Peas, 

Beans, Dried Apples, Oranges and Lemons. 

Nos. jo3 and no Faneuil Hall Market - - BOSTON. 

Henry Farnum. W. W. Lawrence. 



GEORGE E. JOHNSON, 



■DEALER in- 



Hay, Grain and Feed, 

Lexington Street, 
AUBURNDALE, MASS. 

CHARLES G. TINKHAM, 

Lifuir, M and Boards Stable. 

Cor. of Lexington and Severn Sts., 
AITBURNDALE, ' 

JOHNSTON & KEYES, 

AUBURNDALE AND BOSTON EXPRESS. 



boston offices, 

105 Arch. Street, 
34 Court Square. 



AUBURNDALE OFFICE, 
Lexington Street, 
Near the Depot 



H. EUGENE FLEMING, PH. G. 

PHARMACIST, 

FINE CONFECTIONERY a Specialty. 

Near City Hall - • West Newton, Mass. 








■■ ■■. ■ ■ .■ ■■■ ■ 



PRIL, 1888 




L^ECC LE/U/^S 



VOLUME XIII. -No. 7. 



CONTENTS. 



Editorials 123 

A Lasell Girl in the South 125 

Sanitary Science 127 

The Washington Trip 127 

Charles Reade 128 

Foreign Visitors . . 130 

A New Book on Temperance • . . . . 130 



Scientific Notes 131 

Political Notes 131 

Art Notes 131 

Major and Minor 132 

Exchanges 132 

Locals 133 

'Personals 134 



Lasell Leaves. 



NOVELTIES 



■IN 



MILLINERY 

RECEIVED DAILY FROM PARIS and LONDON, 



Ladles are invited to call and examine before purchaaiag 
elsewhere. Correct Styles. Popular prices. 



HENRY M. BURR & CO. 



490 Washington. Street, 



BOSTON. 



ARTHUR P. SCHMIDT & CO. 

IMPORTERS OP AS* DBALBES IN 

FOREIGN AND AMERICAN 

Sheet Music. 

Sole Agents lor Litolffs Celebrated Edition or 

Classical and Modern Music. 

13 AND 15 WEST ST., BOSTON. 

Catalogues sent free on application. 

LAWRENCE, WILDE & CO. 

Manufacturers */ Fir tt-C lent 

FURNITURE 

AND 

INTERIOR DECORA TIONS, 

Nos. 38 to 48 Cornhill - - Boston. 



A. I.AWRHMCa. 

Wm. H. Hull. 



Gbo. B. Dabsow 
F. D. Wuj>8. 



ESTABLISHED 1830. 



ALFRED MUDGE & SON, 

PRINTERS, 

No. 24 FRANKLIN STREET, BOSTON, MASS. 

HAVE UNSURPASSED FACILITIES FOR 

BOOK AND MISCELLANEOUS PRINTING, 

ELECTROTYPING AND STEREOTYPING, 

MERCANTILE AND COMMERCIAL PRINTING, 

FANCY BALL AND SOCIETY PRINTING. 



LAW WORK A SPECIALTY. 

A FULL LINE OF WEDDING STATIONERY ENGRAVED OR PRINTED. 

WEDDING OUTFITS executed In the finest manner at reasonable prices. 

Information regarding work in any department will at all times be promptly furnished, either 
personally or by correspondence. 

ALFRED MUDGE & SON, 24 FRANKLIN STREET. 



Lasell Leaves. 



12 



C. D. COBB & BROS. 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 

GROCERIES 

Of the Very Finest Quality, 

And IMPORTERS of 

->6FANCY GRIDES TEAS 9*- 

Every .Article Warranted. 



Orders of $20 and upwards Delivered at any 
point within lOO miles of Boston. 



FOR PARTICULARS, SEND FOR CATALOGUE TO 

C. D. Cobb & Bros. 

722 to 732 Washington Street, 
BOSTON - - - MASS. 



T. E. MOSELEY & CO. 



DEALERS IN 



BOOTS, SHOES, RUBBERS, ETC. 

FOR LADIES, GENTLEMEN, BOYS, 
MISSES AND CHILDREN. 

A Large Assortment for 

YOUNG LHDIES. 



GYMNASIUM SHOES 

In Great Variety. 

ENGLISH LAST WALKING BOOTS, 

In CALF or GOAT, 
Are SENSIBLE, DURABLE, and REASONABLE in Price, 



COBB, BATES & YERXA, 

I MP OR TJSR S 



AND 



GROCERS. 



Twenty-dollar orders delivered free at any station 
within 50 miles of Boston, and fifty-dollar orders at 
any station in New England, at our regular retail prices 



T. E. MOSELEY & CO. 

469 Washington Street, 

BOSTON. 



COBB, BATES & YERXA, 

680 to 692 Washington Street, 
3 Bcwdcin Square, 

6 and 8 Faneuil Hall Square. 



Also in 



CHELSEA, FALL RIVEE and TAUNTON. 



GOOD MUSIC FOR ALL THE YEAR ROUND. 

Is found in such books as the following, which, when kept at hand, fur- 
nish unfailing entertainment for the player or singer. 

Song Classics for Low Voices. 

(one dollar.) 
About 50 Gems of Song by the best modern composers; Rubinstein. 
Lassen, Grieg, Gounod and others. A true treasure for Alto, Baritone 
and Bass Voices. 

SONG- CLASSICS. 

(one dollar.) 
For voices of average compass. All selected from the best sources. 

ZPIAHNTO CLASSICS. 

(ONE DOLLAR.) 
An admirable collection of pieces in the best taste, by some of the best 
living composers. 

YOUNG- PEOPLE'S CLASSICS. 

(ONE DOLLAR.) 
Easy pieces that will please all, young or old. 

The Good Old Songs We Used to Sing. 

($1.00 paper; $1.-25 BDS.1 
A grand good new book, which will be received with open arms in 
every household. About 120 songs, with piano or organ accompaniment. 
Each one has been a distinguished success. Many are new to the pres- 
ent generation. Mailed for Retail Price. 

OLIVER DITSON & CO.. BOSTON. 

GEO. E. ALLEN, 



12 Winter Street 



Boston. 



BUTTONS. LACES. YARNS, CORSETS, 



AND FANCY GOODS. 



VOUNG'S HOTEL 

EUROPI 



PEAN PLAN. 

3F' : 0.rITE THE HEAD OF 3TATF STREET, 30 
Ladies' entrance, Court Street, near Washington Street. 
J. R. WHIPPLE, PROPRIETOR. 



122 



Lasell Leaves. 



HASTING 



S 



LADIES' FINE FOOTWEAR. 



q^E op 



HOTOGRAPHER. 



I We have added for Spring and Summer, many new lines, in- 
cluding specialties of which we have exclusive control. 



Wc offer fo Ir)c ©raduafirjcf and (Etrjder , p y IV f AT A Q T T T ]\ /[ CUACC 
glasses, arjd also fo irjei* ^urgerous friends, ! VJ 1 1V1 1\ AO 1 U IVl OflUDO, 

unusual adwanfaqes, bom Top excellence ol 

WEDDING AND PARTY 

PHOTOGRAPHIC WORK 

and reasonable prices. Wc quararjfee fl;e JjUU 1 O AND oLlll dKo. 

rnosf e/lriisfic If roduciiorjs rnadc. 



No. 147 Tremont Street I HENRY H - TUTTLE & CO. 

i 

comer of west street, 436 Washington Street, 

BOSTON - - MASS. BOSTON. 

THE CLASSi 







PHOTOGRAPHER 



*\,\ /J' 






For Lasell Seminary, 



*♦— - 



*'88« 



Studio 22 Winter Street, 



BOSTON. 



LASELL LEAVES. 



DUX FEMINA FACTI. 



Volume XII , 



LASELL SEMINARY, AUBUpDALE, MASS,, APRIL, 1BBB. 



{lumber 7, 



LASELL LEAVES. 



Published Monthly, during the School Year, 



Lasell Publishing Association 



LASELL SEMINARY FOR YOUNG WOMEN, 



Auburndale, Mass. 



Editor-in- Ch iff. 
DAISY E. LLOYD. 

Local Editor. 
ALLIE GARDNER. 



Political Editor. 
SUSAN J. DAY. 

Musical Editor. 
LUCY SARGEANT. 

Exchange Editor. 
IRENE CUSHMAN. 



.Si ientific Editor. 
MABEL RAUM, '89. 

Art Editor. 
EDITH A. ELLIS. 

Business Manager. 
LINA A. JONES, '88. 



Subscription Agent. 
BLANCHE PRUYME. 



TERMS, IN ADVANCE. 
One Copy, one year (including postage) . . $1.00 
Single Numbers ic cts. 



ADVERTISING RATES. 



SPACE. 


3 MONTHS. 


6 MONTHS. 


9 MONTHS. 


I-I2 Col 


umn .... 


(1.50 


#2.50 


#3-5° 


1-6 




3.00 


S.OO 


7.00 


1-4 




4.00 


6.5O 


9.00 


1-2 




6.50 


II.OO 


15.00 


3-4 




9.00 


I5.OO 


20.00 


1 




12.00 


I9.OO 


25.00 



Press of Alfred Madge & Son, 24 Franklin St., Boston. 



Spring vacation over, we find ourselves prepar- 
ing work planned for the last term of the year. 
The end of that seemingly endless winter term 
has been reached. None but ourselves can real- 
ize how rapidly the clays pass away here, without 
the least urging on our part. The adage, " Time 
waits for no man," comes upon us in a new and all 
too real light. We are constantly overcome with 
the thought of how little, on the whole, we have 
accomplished during the past months, and we 
blindly wonder how we are to cram our poor 
brains with the knowledge we covet in these few 
remaining weeks. There is food for much thought 
here. 

An education is not an easy thing to acquire ; 
the more we know, the better we realize how much 
there is that we do not know, and probably never 
will. If we can learn to seize all the opportunities 
offered to us now in our youth, during our school 
days, and to utilize our time to the best advantage 
here at Lasell, we will have taken some steps on 
the " royal road," and may never have to regret 
that we were too economical of ourselves and of the 
gifts given us. 

It is not our minds alone we are called upon to 
train : " a true education consists even more 
largely in the training of the character and of the 
will than in book knowledge." 



We offer thanks from the bottom of our boots to 
the former editor for her bright suggestion of 
appointing a school poet. We acted upon that 
suggestion at once, and now that the poet really 
is, the entire school is thrown into a state of ex- 
pectancy. What effusion this poet will bring forth 
first is the question which agitates us. It seems 
to be a generally established custom nowadays 
for every one to believe that, "In the spring a 
young man's fancy," etc. ; and we are in a 
tremble, fearing a young woman may be taken 



124 



Lasell Leaves. 



that way too. We have a superfluity of spring 
poetry on hand now, besides being almost ill from 
wading through poems of this sort published by 
our contemporary over the way. 

We modestly ask our poet not to allow her feel- 
ings to be hurt if we beg her to overlook spring 
emotions, and breathe forth a theme sage, loyal, 
and inspiring, for the benefit of her breathless 
listeners. Breathe it soon, please, for we are 
thinking of forming a glee club, and are willing to 
put most anything to music. 



A "Lasell Battalion" has been formed in 
our midst, and we are bursting with pride. Lasell, 
with her proverbial go-aheadativeness, has risen 
above others of her kind by adding this to the 
many attractions already offered. We have a 
wild desire to witness the battalion in full play ; 
therefore we make our bow — a very low one this 
time — to the major and the several under officers, 
and beg that as soon as they get the companies or 
a company drilled down to a fine point they invite 
the editorial staff to a review of said company or 
companies. A pardonable curiosity on the staff's 
part will thus be gratified, and the whole Battalion 
brought into prominence. We purpose to make 
all their military accomplishments visible to the 
naked eye through the columns of our paper, if 
our desire is acceded to with good grace, and at 
an early date. If it is ignored, our vengeance will 
pour forth. We will cause the Battalion to lan- 
guish and sink into insignificance. How? By the 
power of our pen, mightier than that of their best 
diamond-hilted sword. Attention !! 



That Pin once more! We are going to adopt 
extreme measures if we have to say anything here- 
after upon this already worn-out subject, excepting 
that we are the happy possessors of a Lasell pin. 

When the last design was exhibited, we congrat- 
ulated ourselves, thinking we had certainly hit it 
this time, but alas ! Frankly, now, don't you 
think we have been rather hard to please in this 
matter and let too much responsibility rest upon 
one generous friend's shoulders ? As a rule, we 
are pretty sensible here at Lasell, and once in a 
century or so do a neat thing, but in this instance 



we have fallen short of the mark and exhausted 
even our own patience. Some of us, it is true, 
have spent a tremendous amount of thought upon 
this subject, — parts of sleepless nights racking 
our brains for designs,— parts of busy mornings in 
vain attempts to put upon paper the ideas which 
had bubbled up to overflowing during the night. 
Friends from afar have been asked to contribute to 
our happiness by forwarding original designs; in 
fact, we have thought of many ways to fill this com- 
mon want. All useless, however ; and what a thrill- 
ing sigh of relief we would heave if some one 
would settle the question ! 

The staff is now ready to receive any and all 
designs, without asking questions. If some one 
wants to make this festive body think life worth 
living, they have only to submit a sketch. If their 
efforts do not meet with our approval, it will be 
kept secret. The design will be carefully pre- 
served, and later, when the donors' modesty per- 
mits, it shall be framed, and given a place high up 
in the Art Gallery. Think of the glory ! 

For ourselves, if we maybe permitted to send 
our sentiments to print, we very much like the idea 
of a book in plain gold, but think the present de- 
sign could be improved upon. The book could be 
made a prettier shape ; it opens awkwardly. If the 
corners are rounded a little they will not be liable 
to catch upon everything catchable ; otherwise 
they will be a source of annoyance. The lettering 
might be more elaborate — oddly shaped letters, 
etc., to give the general appearance of the pin a 
more finished look. If " Lasell " has to be en- 
graved upon both leaves, in order to get the word 
on, perhaps it would look well engraved diago- 
nally. 

We do not like the idea of having both the old 
and new designs. As it is to be a pin for all Lasell 
girls past, present, and future, we would like the 
pin decided upon by the majority of the present 
Lasell girls to be the one worn as the " Lasell- 
pin" henceforth. 

Any further information upon the subject will 
be imparted at special rates, furnished on appli- 
cation at the sanctum. 



Concentration is the secret of strength in 
all management of human affairs. — Emerson. 



Lasell Leaves. 



125 



We must apologize for an omission in the 
March number of the Leaves. Through some 
carelessness, the concert by the Wesleyan Glee 
Club was barely mentioned. We do not under- 
stand this, as the concert was quite an event, and 
the so-called " novel " entertainment must have 
charmed the most prosaic soul among us. At the 
appointed hour, we dislike to say that the ap- 
pointed hour was some twenty minutes later than 
was announced, for promptness is an admirable 
virtue in the eyes of Lasell girls, — the sixteen 
men composing the Glee Club passed through the 
gymnasium to the temporary stage. Finding the 
quarters there somewhat close, they proceeded, 
with a promptness not hitherto manifested, to 
remove the objectionable front row of chairs, and 
after a few more preliminaries the leader gave his 
head a graceful swerve, and the club rendered the 
first selection upon the programme with a vigor 
and charm which won them enthusiastic applause. 
The next selection, " Little Dog," a whistle, by 
Mr. Richards, was well received and much 
enjoyed. The far from woful "Tale of Woe," 
by Mr. Gill and the club, was rendered in such a 
charming manner that the audience insisted upon 
two recalls. Many songs followed these, all of 
which the club sang with pleasing effect. Their 
voices harmonized beautifully, and the men sang 
with a volume and precision most creditable, call- 
ing forth many encores. The solo, "Schnider," 
by Mr. Griffin, had been looked forward to with 
pleasant anticipation ; and we were not disap- 
pointed : the noise he made would alone have been 
sufficient to win him an encore. We were unani- 
mous in pronouncing that solo one of the gems 
of the evening. Our kind-heartedness alone pre- 
vented us from asking him to sing the rest of the 
evening. 

After the concert the S. D. Society, with a few 
invited guests, retired to the parlors, where they 
had the gleasure of beaming upon eight of the 
Glee Club men, who beamed upon them in return. 
We were sorry not to have met the other eight, 
who, unfortunately, belonged to numerous church 
choirs in the vicinity of Middletown, and were 
obliged to hie away on the first train. We embrace 
the opportunity here presented to say that we re- 
ceived their " regrets," sent from South Framing- 
ham. Some may be interested to know that these 



" regrets " were not things of beauty when they 
reached Lasell. Written upon the club's last, lone 
postal, with a soft pencil, and having travelled 
some distance, this postal, when it came to us, 
looked as if it had been through a spring freshet, and 
it took us several valuable seconds to decipher the 
letters. We mildly suggest that, even though the 
men were so financially embarrassed, they might 
have used some of the " above the average " col- 
lege man's cheek, and borrowed a small amount of 
ink and paper. This is only some sisterly advice 
we offer. 

After the reception we had the good fortune to 
again hear the voices of the club, in a serenade. 
We highly appreciated this generosity, and were 
loath indeed to hear the notes die away in the 
distance, as the members of the club wended 
their way to the hotel. The S. D. Society pro- 
nounced the concert a success that reflects great 
credit upon — the Wesleyan Glee Club. So be it ! 



A LASELL GIRL IN THE SOUTH. 

Away down here in sunny North Carolina, far 
from Boston's literary delights and searching east 
winds, we are obliged to look for much of our 
amusement to mother Nature. A walk in the 
pine woods has always something new for those 
who watch a bird that comes with the spring 
and makes the woods echo with his clear, joyful 
notes. We must find out his name. But there is 
no mistaking the jolly robin redbreast, that hops 
so cheerily about, almost at our feet. He is not a 
new-comer, though, for he spends his winter here, 
like a sensible bird ; and the climate must agree 
with him, for such a fat robin was never seen in 
the North. 

Perhaps you have never been walking serenely 
along in some quiet wood path, steeping yourself 
in the warm piny sunshine, and suddenly, with- 
out any warning, found yourself surrounded with 
a cloud of brown rushing forms, that flew away 
with a loud whir-r whir-r, that made your heart 
stand still from fright. Nothing but quails; but 
we are not sportsmen, and the sensation was de- 
cidedly novel. 

One day it occurred to me that house plants 
would flourish finely in our south window, so I 
began to experiment with various seeds and some 
bulbs. But it took so long for all these things to 



126 



Lasell Leaves. 



grow, that I determined to call on a "pore white" 
family that lived " beyond the hill," and ask for 
some geraniums. 

The house was built in the real Southern style: 
walls made of rough boards, unpainted, and put 
together so carelessly that I could actually see 
daylight through the cracks in the opposite side ! 

Not a window, of course, for the wide-open 
door furnished the ventilation and light not sup- 
plied by the cracks aforesaid. 

By the way, no matter how cold or stormy the 
weather may be, a true Southerner never closes 
the door. A bigger fire is kept in the great smutty 
fireplace, and the family gathers round, not 
minding how cold their backs are, if their faces 
are fast toasting into a glowing red. 

As I went through an opening in the rail fence 
and up to the little shed-like room that contained the 
basin and dipper that were used in the morning 
ablutions of the whole family, I could look into 
the kitchen and see the young wife as she sat on 
a little stool near the door. 

A pretty, black-eyed young woman she was, not 
more than twenty years old. If her fine black 
hair had not been drawn so tightly back from her 
low forehead, and if her strong teeth had not been 
disfigured by the " snuff-dipping" that she, like 
most of the country women of her class, indulges 
in. one would not have wished for a more comely 
little creature. 

She was dressed in a gown of drab homespun, 
faded and much darned, but very clean. 

" How-dy," she said, as I came up to the 
door. " Come in and hev a seat. How 's yer 
folks ? We 've hed right smart er damp weather 
lately, hev n't we ? " Her voice was low and 
sweet, but she drawled a good deal. 

As I sat down in the little inner room — there 
were only two — I could not help wondering why 
so much space was wasted in that enormous chim- 
ney, which was in itself a room, large enough for 
two children, besides the fire. The room was fur- 
nished with beds mostly, though there was a chair 
and a table, both home-made. There were two 
beds — one little and one big — placed against 
the wall, so that at night the occupants could gaze 
through the cracks at the stars and moon. No 
lack of fresh air there ! 

The table was ornamented with a broken china 



mug filled with a bouquet of faded red paper 
flowers. 

Mistress Spain sat on the large bed, with her 
arms folded. 

" Thear 's er heap er geranums thar," she said, 
when I made my request. " Fred knows how tuh . 
make um grow. Will ye come out tuh see 
urn ? " 

So I went with her through the crowd of hens 
that gathered around, clamorous for food, to the 
back of the yard, where, in a pit several feet below 
the surface of the ground, the plants were kept. 

Beautiful ones they were, not only geraniums, 
but many choice varieties of roses, and other 
plants that I did not know. 

" Heah 's ez many ez ye kin tote, I reckon," she 
said, as she climbed up with her arms full of green 
things. I " reckoned" so, too, as I took the plants 
from her, and started homeward. 

As I reached the road, a very lean gray kitten, 
with great, bulging, yellow eyes, and a tail without 
any hair on it, rubbed herself up against me, as if 
asking me to take her up. Poor cat ! I'm afraid 
she did n't flourish on hoe-cake, or whatever she 
was fed with in the Spain mansion. 

On my way, the plants grew so heavy that I sat 
down to rest, and was entertained for a whole half- 
hour by some pigs that were grunting and squeal- 
ing about in search of roots. There was one full 
grown, and a half a dozen little yellow ones, that 
would have made Charles Lamb shed tears, they 
were so very, very thin. No wonder they are so, 
poor things, turned loose and obliged to roam 
the woods in search of food, which is not abun- 
dant after the persimmons season is over. 

But it was n't long before the pigs betook them- 
selves to fresh hunting grounds, and I took up the 
plants and picked my way back over the hill by a 
" short-cut," which is, after all, not much shorter 
than the road, being covered with the long, matted 
grass, which is yellow at this season, but which 
grows green again in the summer time. 

This town in which I am spending such a pleas- 
ant winter is a new health resort, in which you 
may be interested ; not because you need to visit 
such a place, but because it was founded, and 
caused to grow and flourish largely by the influence 
of Mr. Goodridge, formerly teacher of Greek and 
Latin at Lasell. 



Las ell Leaves. 



127 



When he came here, three years ago, there was 
only one house in the place; now the town bids 
fair to become one of the most desirable health 
resorts in the South. There are two hotels, a 
school-house, a town hall, and many neat, new 
houses are being built. 

The climate is charming; instead of the cold 
storms and winds of the North, we have a warm, 
dry air, bright sunshine, and a soil that is never 
muddy, (can't you realize the delights of that, you 
girls who have just come from a day's shopping 
in Boston town?) not even after the heaviest rain- 
storms. 

The long-leaf pines, so celebrated for their 
curative properties, grow abundantly here ; and 
there is a plentiful supply of pure soft water. 

I have often wished that New England could 
be gently laken up some stormy night when it 
was fast asleep and carefully set down in this 
delightful State of North Carolina. 

Amid the many favorable conditions, it would 
soon surpass itself. Boston would be more than 
ever the Athens of America, and Johns Hopkins 
would send its professors to Lasell to take a 
special course ! 

Mary E. Coe, 
Southern Pines, N. C. 



SANITARY SCIENCE. 

As a corollary to the interesting lectures on 
sanitary science, a few of our number gladly ac- 
cepted the kind offer of Mr. French, Lasell 
Seminary's master plumber, to inspect, under his 
guidance, the fine, new residence of Mr. Young, 
the fitting of which has been clone by Mr. French. 

On March 8 sixteen of us, after a pleasant ride 
of half an hour, reached the beautiful hill on 
which stands the house, where Mr. French was 
waiting to escort us over the building. 

First to the cellar, where the drainage and ven- 
tilation were explained ; then to the upper rooms, 
where the water supply and bath and water-closet 
system were illustrated. We were at liberty to 
ask as many questions as we chose, and I am sure 
we all learned something. We wish to extend 
to Mr. French our sincere thanks for his kindness 
in giving us the opportunity of learning so much 
about one of the most essential parts of a house. 



THE WASHINGTON TRIP. 

Wednesday afternoon, March 28, was a long 
one to the Lasell girls who were waiting impa- 
tiently for the time to come to start for Wash- 
ington. How glad we would have been to have 
had some of those long minutes at our disposal 
on our trip, for the time went only too fast ! 
When we reached Fall River we found that it 
was very foggy, and our faces darkened as we 
thought of the possibility of seeing Washington 
from under umbrellas. 'T was only for a mo- 
ment, however, — Lasell girls are not given to 
worrying, — and we settled ourselves on board 
the " Pilgrim " and enjoyed ourselves. 

Some outside friends and old Lasell girls 
joined us on the way, and when we left New 
York the next morning we numbered over 
thirty. Every clay of our stay in Washington 
was like the first, which gave us a most delightful 
impression of the city ; it was bright and sunny, 
and so warm that sealskins were decidedly below 
par. After lunch at the Ebbitt House we went 
to the Capitol, were shown into the House of 
Representatives, and heard Nelson, of Min- 
nesota, speak on that entirely new and novel 
question, the Tariff. One of the girls seemed to 
be peculiarly affected by this speech, perhaps 
because he mentioned Wisconsin, her native 
State ; at any rate, she walked out of the gallery, 
leaving her pocket book, containing about ninety 
dollars, on the floor. She had a good scare, but 
happily it was only a scare, for thanks to the 
husband of an old Lasell girl it was returned 
the day before we came away. 

Next morning we had a delightful carriage ride 
around the city, then took the steamer for Mt. 
Vernon. It is needless to say that we enjoyed 
ourselves there : the old home of our first President, 
with its quaint furniture and relics, is so interest- 
ing, and the view across the Potomac very beau- 
tiful. Going back we saw Fort Washington again, 
and the church attended years ago by George 
Washington was pointed out to us in the queer old 
city of Alexandria. Carriages were waiting for 
us in Washington, and we continued our drive of 
the morning. 

Saturday, to the Treasury in the morning, and 
then to the Corcoran Art Gallery. Many lin- 



128 



Las ell Leaves. 



gered before "The Vestal Virgin," "A Helping 
Hand," and "Charlotte Corday" ; and we sighed 
that we had no more time to spend there. We 
went to the National Museum in the afternoon, 
and many of the girls had callers in the evening. 
Sunday was a perfect Easter Sunday. We went 
to church in the morning, some to the Metropoli- 
tan and others to the Foundry Church. In the 
evening Mrs. Shepherd took us out to Mrs. 
Somer's school, where we heard Miss Frances 
Willard speak. We spent a very pleasant 
evening, and were charmed with both Mrs. Som- 
ers and the young ladies. 

Monday, we went to the Patent Office, hur- 
riedly looked through the one room open to visit- 
ors at the Dead Letter Office, then to the 
Pension Office, and from there to the Capitol. 
We went first to the Supreme Court room, -and 
were present at the impressive opening of the 
session. Judge Miller, of Iowa, presided, as he 
is the senior judge, and no one has been appoint- 
ed as yet in place of the late Chief Justice 
Waite. Many prominent men were pointed out 
to us in the Senate, and we were there when the 
bill granting Mrs. Logan's pension was passed. 
In the afternoon, after a look — a rather savage 
look, I fear — at the crowd between us and the 
White House doors, that made our chance of 
seeing the President a small one, we turned away, 
and consoled ourselves with a drive to Arlington, 
the old home of Gen. Lee. It is a most beautiful 
place, on a high hill overlooking the Potomac. 

It was a sleepy party that took the seven-o'clock 
train for New York the next morning. We 
awakened though when we found that Pundita 
Ramabai, the high-born Hindu woman, of whom 
we have heard so much, was on the train. We 
saw her, and heard her talk, and Mrs. Shepherd 
thinks that she may speak to us at Lasell some 
time soon. 

In New York we met Helen Pfau, Elizabeth 
Brownell, Sue Stearns, and Harrie Joy. We saw 
and admired the famous painting by Makoffsky, 
" Choosing the Bride," and then went reluctantly 
to the boat. It bore us out past the statue of Lib- 
erty, under the Brooklyn Bridge, to Fall River, and 
almost before we knew it we were on our way 
out to Auburndale. We could not tell Mr. and 
Mrs. Shepherd how much we had enjoyed our 



trip, but we hope they understand. Let no La- 
sell girl hesitate when trying to determine how to 
spend her spring vacation, for a week in Wash- 
ington with the Lasell party will never be re- 
gretted. M. L. B. 



CHARLES READE. 

Since Charles Reade's death, some of the 
critics tell us that his works have always been 
much more widely known in America than in 
Europe. They also kindly tell us that this fact is 
not due to America's inability to discriminate be- 
tween first and second class literary merit, but 
that it is due — at least so far as England is con- 
cerned — to two comparatively superficial causes. 
One of them is found in the character of Mr. 
Reade himself. To a wonderful energy of genius 
and temperament he added a more than feminine 
susceptibility to criticism. " With a faith in his 
own capacity, and an admiration for his own 
works such as never were surpassed in literary 
history, he could yet be rendered almost beside 
himself by censure from the obscurest critic in the 
corner of the poorest provincial newspaper. There 
was no pen so feeble that it could not rouse him 
into a fine frenzy." He replied to every attack, 
and discovered a personal enemy in every critic. 
Therefore he was always quarrelling, always at- 
tacking or being attacked, always doing his utmost 
to prevent the public from appreciating or even 
recognizing the genuine worth of his strange and 
paradoxical character. 

The other reason urged is, that during the early 
part of his career he wrote in one of the popular 
London weekly journals which corresponds some- 
what to the New York Ledger. He worked boldly 
then and did his best; and, moreover, he put his 
own name to the work. Perhaps that signature 
was his only literary crime. Any way, it is urged 
that because of it the London press has always 
been inclined to regard him as an author of the 
class " whose genius supplies weekly instalments 
of sensation and tremendously high life to delight 
the servant-girls and the errand-boys of the city." 

Doubtless the facts adduced by these critics are 
such as would have more weight in England than 
in America; but, all prejudices put aside, there 
must be some common standard by which both 
England and America can judge of Mr. Reade's 



Lasell Leaves. 



129 



literary excellence. Neither country will be satis- 
fied with those qualifications alone which seem to 
mean so such to some of his friends, i. <?. , that 
he was of good English family, a graduate of 
Magdalen College, Oxford, a man of culture and 
scholarship, and that his reading — especially his 
classical acquirements — was far wider and deeper 
than those of Thackeray. 

Perhaps no writer of equal eminence has shown 
the character and principles of his genius so 
clearly from the very start. He has created no 
characters and uttered no thoughts that are not 
found in his earliest books, — k ' Peg Woffington," 
" Christie Johnstone," and " Cloister and the 
Hearth." All his more recent works, and they 
are many, are crude and rough in comparison 
with these, and ought to have led up to them in- 
stead of succeeding them. After these first three 
works, Keade began to devote himself to exposing 
his or that social and legal grievance calling for 
reform. The treatment of criminals in prison and 
in far-off penal settlements became his favorite 
topics. " He converted parliamentary blue- 
books into works of fiction." He took hard and 
naked facts as he found them in some newspaper 
and so blended them with other material that it 
is hard to tell which is fiction and which reality. 

He thus sums up his aim in the last sentence of 
" Put Yourself in His Place": k ' I have taken 
a few undeniable truths out of many, and have 
labored to make my readers realize those appall- 
ing facts of the day which most men know, but 
not one in a thousand comprehends, and not one 
in a hundred thousand realizes, until fiction — 
which, whatever you may have been told to the 
contrary, is the highest, widest, noblest, and great- 
est of all the arts — comes to his aid, studies, 
penetrates, digests the hard facts of chronicles and 
blue-books, and makes their dry bones live." 
The little touch of unconscious self-glorification is 
just as characteristic of Reade as in the aim. 

Most of the scenes he described, in England at 
least, have in some way been a part of his own ex- 
perience. He did actually bestir himself in the 
case of a person whom he believed to be unjustly 
confined in a lunatic asylum as energetically as 
does Dr. Lampson in " Hard Cash," — and with a 
like result. He is tremendously in earnest, and 
evidently works often on the theory that the end 



justifies the means — so far as novel-writing is 
concerned. His enthusiasm runs away with him, 
and he lays himself open to the charge of seeking 
outside the limits of art for the means of mov- 
ing his readers, of casting probability to the 
winds, and riding wildly over all the laws of cir- 
cumstance. These censures have a good founda- 
tion. He is occasionally coarse, as in " Griffith 
Gaunt " ; but he is never immoral, unless, as one 
says, it is immoral for an author to let people 
commit sin, and yet not be eaten by lions or bodily 
carried down below, like Don Juan. 

The island in " Foul Play " is, perhaps, as good 
an illustration as we could give in defending the 
justice of the second charge, — that of casting prob- 
ability to the winds. That island is, throughout 
its length and breadth, an impossible island. The 
way in which it develops " A place for every- 
thing and everything in its place " is at times sim- 
ply laughable. Yet we enjoy it all, for, throughout 
the whole story, we border so near the impossi- 
ble that degrees of the improbable don't count. 

Mr. Reade's repertoire of character is limited. 
He has one magnificent woman, full of noble in- 
stincts, and much sinned against. She is his 
delight, and he cannot too often reproduce her. 
His other woman is a simple, loving, feminine 
creature, who is for a time the rival, and finally 
the conqueror and friend of the first. Between 
these women he has a fondness for placing a weak 
often contemptible, man. This grouping is seen 
conspicuously in " Peg Woffington" and " Griffith 
Gaunt." The circle is small, but it offers scope 
for many dramatic and effective contrasts. 

Peg Woffington, Christie Johnstone, and Kate 
Gaunt are types of his first woman. They are 
powerful and brilliant, ready to do and dare at 
any hazard for the right ; but at the same time, 
" they are not above the deception of society, or 
those benevolent tricks which a fertile imagination 
suggests for the management and well-being of 
others." 

Each is perfectly true to her surroundings and 
to her age. Their costume is varied with all the 
skill of consummate art ; they think as becomes 
their different stations and times, without the 
slightest confusion of identity ; and yet they are 
one. 

Mabel Vane and Mercy Vint are types of his 



<30 



Lasell Leaves. 



other woman, — the meek, sweet, blue-eyed crea- 
ture from the country. They suffer, but their 
sufferings are not so deep that they cannot be 
gauged by copious falls of tears. The fly leaf to a 
library copy of " Queechy " bears the statement 
that Fleda weeps two hundred and fifty-six times, 
by actual count. The tears that Mabel and 
Mercy shed are not of the kind that are reducible 
to mathematical computation. They are quiet 
and "Aprilly," — the sort that lays the mental dust, 
and makes moving on a delight to all concerned. 

If, now, we turn to Mr. Reade's men, we are 
tempted to ask whether he purposely uses one 
class of them to work out a theory of woman's 
rights all his own, or whether it is mere accident 
that always places his weakest, most craven man 
as a foil to his noblest, most heroic woman. 

One of his favorite heroes is a "Bayard-Crusoe 
Combination," like Henry Little and Capt. Dodd. 
He gives us also the rough, eccentric character, 
Dr. Lampson or Dr. Amboyne, whose principal 
business is to help the people of the book through 
all their trials and tribulations. 

His villains stray so far from their intended 
sphere that they represent almost the only comic 
element in the book. 

His characters are all sketchy ; they are phases 
rather than beings. He groups them artistically, 
and arranges them in many fine dramatic situa- 
tions ; but he does not give them a sustained life, 
simply because he does not know them and their 
needs. He has the idea — borrowed from old- 
fashioned novels rather than from the life around 
him — that the close of a book must leave all the 
characters happily situated, no matter if the prog- 
ress of the book has shown every possible reason 
why they should not and can not be happy. This 
circumstance alone would keep him from ever 
being a really great novelist ; but in addition to 
this, all the higher gifts of imagination and all the 
richer veins of humor have been denied to him. 
" He is simply a powerful story-teller, with a 
manly purpose in every tale he tells." F. 



FOREIGN VISITORS. 

Mr. and Mrs. E. M. Walsh, from Paia Mani, 

Hawaiian Islands, with a sister of Mrs. Walsh, 

Mrs. E. C. Damon, of Honolulu, visited Lasell 

this week to call on Miss Mary G. Beckwith. It 



was a great treat to her to see these cousins from 
her far-off home. They went about the school, 
noticing its many advantages and seeming much 
interested. It was gratifying to meet people of 
their intelligence straight from those interesting 
islands, which so few of us are likely to visit, who 
speak from personal knowledge of the changes 
which are taking place in their midst. As a sam- 
ple of the advance of the country during the last 
fifty years, Mr. Walsh presented to Mr. Brag- 
don a large silver coin of the realm, a coin of 
1883, bearing upon one side the head of King 
Kalakaua, on the other the national coat-of arms, 
and above it the motto, " The life of a nation is 
preserved by righteousness." To this Christian 
standpoint these islands have come in the growth 
of years. 

Speaking of coins, Mr. Bragdon ha had another 
gift of a coin, this time from Miss Emma M. 
Barnum. This small but heavy silver piece was 
picked up in Turkey, and belongs to the time of 
Alexander the Great. It is battered and unshape- 
ly, but its inscriptions well deserve the attention of 
the curious student of numismatics. One side we 
cannot explain ; the other has the head of Jupiter 
Ainmon, and is marked, " Basilons Alexandro." 
There are also Greek signs for the different coun- 
tries subjugated by the great conqueror, the earth- 
born Jupiter of that time. 



A NEW BOOK ON TEMPERANCE. 

We wish to return thanks for a copy of The 
Temperance Movement, by Senator Blair, sent to 
us by the William E. Smythe Company. 

The book is one that all prohibitionists will 
be glad to have in their libraries. The author 
touches upon all points involved in the temperance 
question in an earnest and thorough manner. The 
arguments he presents for a life of total abstinence 
are of the strongest. We find the book valuable not 
only for the interesting historic and scientific facts 
relating to the temperance cause which it contains, 
but also for the collection of full-page portraits of 
some of the most prominent workers in the tem- 
perance field. 

This work will, no doubt, do much good, and, 
quoting Miss Frances Willard, " Be to the Grand 
Army of the Temperance Reform what Gen. Grant 
has been to the Grand Army of the Republic." 



Las ell Leaves. 



131 



SCIENTIFIC NOTES. 

The London Globe says : " It is comforting lo 
find that the boiling-point of ' alylenedichlordi- 
bromide ' is 190°, while that of ' methylchlordi- 
bromphopylcarbinylchloride ' is something between 
140 and 1 45 ." 

Natural gas furnishes all the stimulant that is 
needed in Northern Ohio and Indiana. 

A story is now being circulated of a man who 
is able to detect the presence of natural gas by 
virtue of the muscles in the back of his neck. His 
name is J. S. Booker, and comes from no one know s 
where. His story is simply, that on recovering from 
an attack of the asthma he found the muscles of his 
neck very sensitive, and when passing over a vein 
of natural gas the electricty runs through his feet, 
up his legs, along his back, agitates his person, 
and knots up the muscles of his neck. 

He has now placed himself in the hands of a 
manager and is successful. His terms are $50 
for the experiment, and $500 if it proves a success. 

The State chemist of North Carolina has re- 
ceived a report of the discovery, by a Wilmington 
chemist, of a new oil and a process of obtaining it. 

The oil is a hydrocarbon, vegetable in its na- 
ture, and can be made from waste paper, woods, 
etc. It is non-explosive, gives a strong, brilliant 
light, and is a splendid lubricant for all kinds of 
machinery. 

A scheme is under consideration in Mexico for 
tunnelling the volcano of Popocatapetl through 
the wall of the crater, in order to reach the im- 
mense sulphur deposits inside the mountain. A 
narrow-gauge railway is to connect the tunnel 
with the town of Amecameca, which, in turn, will 
connect with the Morelos road, leading to the 
national capitol. 

A new loom is being constructed in Boston, and 
will soon be placed on the market in competition 
with other looms. It is the invention of Messrs. 
Samuel T. Thomas and his son, Winfield S. 
Thomas, both experienced in this work. 

This new loom, embodying valuable and radical 
improvements, has been the product of much 
thought and experiment. 

It is intended, not for any particular line of 
weaving, but for broad and narrow, fancy and 
plain weaving, and for both woolen and cotton 



fabrics. It is claimed by the inventors that one 
of the most pre-eminent of practical advantages of 
the new loom is the easv motion of the harness, 
secured by certain devices, which are claimed lo 
handle the tenderest fibre without breakage. Two 
of the looms are being built, and will be in work- 
ing order in a month's time. 



POLITICAL NOTES. 

The prospects for the passing of the Interna- 
tional Copyright Bill are exceedingly good. 

The Secretary of State has received a mes 
sage from the United States Consul at Tangier, 
from which it is inferred that a satisfactory settle- 
ment of the trouble with the Moorish government 
will soon be reached. 

The new French Cabinet is officially announced. 
M. Floquet is Prime Minister, M. Gobbet is Minis- 
ter of Foreign Affairs, and M. de Freycinct Min- 
ister of War. 

The party in power in England seems to have 
been gaining in strength lately. Some of the 
Liberals who have been dissenting from the gov- 
ernment policy are apparently more contented. 

The coronation of Emperor Frederic and Em- 
press Victoria as King and Queen of Prussia is 
expected to occur at Konigsberg in June. 



ART NOTES. 

For some weeks German newspapers have 
spoken of the reconstruction of the group to which 
the Venus de Milo is supposed to belong. Since the 
year 1824, the incomparable Venus de Milo has 
been perhaps the greatest attraction of the Louvre. 

It is said that the French ambassador at Con- 
stantinople, hearing that a wonderfully beautiful 
statue had been found at Milo, decided to offer it 
to his sovereign, Louis XVIII. The king, after 
gazing upon it for a long time, said : "That is a 
very beautiful object, gentlemen, and a masterpiece 
that deserves a home in our museum : let it be car- 
ried there immediately." But from that time until 
the present, the administration has been embar- 
rassed, because it seems almost impossible to 
decide to what group the statue belongs. Then 
every incomplete statue was restored before the 
eyes of a sovereign were allowed to rest upon it. 



132 



Lasell Leaves. 



The Venus de Milo was considered too exquisite, 
even in ruins, to cast aside, and it furnished abun- 
dant study to the most eminent archaeologists. 

The quarrels became so serious that the case 
was laid before Louis XVIII. He quietly listened 
to the pros and cons for the reconstruction of the 
statue, and answered, "I see you do not agree: 
therefore, do nothing." 

" But, sire, she has no arms." 

" Very well : leave her without arms." And be- 
cause of Louis XVIII. 's order, Venus has re- 
mained armless until this day. 

M. Ravaisson, for many years conservateur of 
the Louvre, is the best authority on the Venus de 
Milo, and he affirms that the German savant has 
only copied his idea of the reconstruction of this 
group. His statements are of the greatest interest. 
"For years," says the venerable man, "I believed, 
with De Clarae, consetvateur of the Louvre during 
Louis XVIII.'s reign, that, because the statue 
inclined towards the right, a companion at the left 
would be possible. But during the war of 1870 
I was obliged to conceal the Venus in a cellar, and 
after the siege I took it from its hiding-place and 
restored it to the Louvre. The humidity had in- 
jured the statue in a slight degree, and I saw that 
the Venus is composed of several pieces, and that 
of these the two most important were joined in the 
folds of drapery. More than that, these pieces 
were badly united, for a shaving of wood had been 
inserted, thus throwing the body towards the 
right. I photographed the statue in that pose, then 
removed the shaving, and, behold! the Venus in 
a natural position. Of course, I then wished tore- 
construct the group. The Louvre possesses the 
finest male statue in existence, — that called in the 
catalogue the Achilles Borghese ; but I believe it 
to be Mars. There are many groups where copies 
of this Mars are beside women in the same atti- 
tude as the Venus de Milo. I had devoted some 
time to sculpture, and asked from the government 
permission to use a corner of the Imperial riding- 
school for a studio. Then I made casts from the 
Venus and the Mars. I placed them side by side, 
restored the parts missing, and on the ground floor 
of the Louvre is my result: " Venus inviting Mars 
to lay down his arms, and to taste the joys of peace." 
The warrior hesitates; and it is this hesitation that 
in the statue called Achilles, has been translated 



Melancholy. Look at Venus ! she is made to be 
seen in profile ; of that I am sure." 

Miss Dora Wheeler is making a portrait gal- 
lery of American men of letters, all of her own 
painting. She has Mr. Lowell, Mr. C. D. Warner, 
Mr. T. B. Aldrich, and Mr. Frank R. Stockton 
completed, and John Burroughs and Walt Whit- 
man in the early stages. 



MAJOR AND MINOR. 

Boston is pluming herself upon having been 
the first city in America to hear Cowen's " Ruth " 
and Wagner's " Early Symphony." 

Madame Gerster has returned to the stage, 
but her former extraordinary voice has by no 
means returned with her. However, she gave 
much pleasure and was warmly welcomed. 

An exceedingly interesting article was published 
in the March Century upon some of Liszt's pupils, 
accompanied by a fine picture of the grand old 
master. 

Little Hofmann can draw pictures as well as 
play the piano, and his last effort was, most ap- 
propriately, a view of a ruined abbey. 

The first of the series of piano-forte concerto 
concerts announced by Mr. B. J. Lang was given 
in Checkering Hall, April 3. A large audience was 
present and enjoyed an especially fine programme. 
Mr. Whelpley quite carried the house by storm 
in his playing of the " McDowell Concerto." 

Rossini was born Feb. 29, 1792, being among 
those whose birthday falls upon the odd day in 
leap year. 

Among the friends of Nilsson and Lucca, it 
used to be said in jest that these prima donnas 
were the two leading lights in a mutual-admiration 
society. 

»*4 

EXCHANGES. 

March brings to us several new exchanges to 
add to our already long list, and, nothwithstand- 
ing the sameness, the March numbers are all 
good. Volapuk still holds vigorous sway in many ; 
one of the best of our exchanges, the King's Col- 
lege Record, devoting five columns to that sub- 
ject. 

Among the more substantial exchanges this 



Lasell Leaves. 



l 33 



month is the Vassar Miscellany. " A Trip to Ki- 
lanea " is only one of the attractions. It is an ex- 
cellent number. 

The Ogonty Mosaic, just received, deserves 
much praise. The editorials are all of interest, 
and the make-up of the paper will compare favor- 
ably with any found on our table. 

With so many of our contemporaries, we can 
only say of the Phillips Exeter Literary Monthly, 
what an excellent exchange it is ! It contains 
much that is attractive and worthy of a place be- 
tween the covers of a literary monthly. 

Noticeably among the good exchanges which 
show much literary merit and strength is the 
Georgetown College Journal, which is to be com- 
mended for the amount of excellent school work 
published. 

The exchange with the handsomest cover and, 
withal, very readable comes this month in the form 
of the Easter Brunonian. 



LOCALS. 

The electric lights were first used in chapel on 
the evening of March 9. 

They were speaking of the Wesleyan Glee 
Club, when a fair maiden asked, " Are all the stu- 
dents of that university studying for the ministry ? " 

The Lasell girls think it no more than right 
that when telegrams come they should be allowed 
to see them, for they might " recognize the writ- 
ing." 

About fifteen of the girls went into Boston to 
the fair given for the benefit of the Home for In- 
temperate Women. Among the charms of the 
evening were the dainty fancy articles sold in the 
different booths, the beautiful floral decorations, 
and the programme. Those taking part were Mrs. 
Clark Cushing, the Ladies' Schubert Quartet, 
Miss Edith Christie, violinist, and the Beacon Or- 
chestral Club. 

Miss Harriet Pierce, daughter of Dr. B. K. 
Pierce, of Newton, delivered a very entertaining 
and instructive lecture on Robert Burns, Wednes- 
day, March 14. She read a number of selections 
from his works. 

And thus time hurries on. Only two months 
and a half more of this school year. 



Under the direction of Mr. Davis, a very enjoy- 
able concert was given on March 9, by the 
Orphean Club and mixed chorus, assisted by 
Miss Gertrude Franklin and Mr. W. H. Dunham ; 
Miss Sparks and Mr. W. Goodrich, accompa- 
nists. Although stormy, the weather did not 
seem to detain many, as the gymnasium was well 
filled. The attractive programme rendered was 
as follows : — 

1. CHORUS OF BACCHANTES (Philemon and Baucis) Gounod 
MIXED CHORUS. 



CHORUS. The Spinning Lesson 

MIXED CHORUS. 

C a. The Rose 
Songs. < b. Who is Silvia? j 

( c. Hark ! The Lark 1 • 

MISS FRANKLIN. 



Martha:' 



. Spohr 
Schubert 

Gclbke 



CHORUS. The Forest Bird 

(With Obligato by Miss Barbour.) 
MIXED CHORUS. 

SONG. Serenade to Mignon Massenet 

MR. DUNHAM. 

VOCAL TRIO. The Mariners .... Randegger 

MISS BARBOUR, MR. W. T. RICE, AND MR. W. W. COLE." 

ARIA Isourd 

MISS FRANKLIN. 



8. CHORUSES. } ?• * n Yonder Glade 
I b. Maiden s Song 



. Taubert 
Meyer-Helmund 



ORPHEAN CLUB. 



SONG. Best of All 



Moir 



MR. DUNHAM 



10. CHORUS. Little Boy Blue Macy 

MIXED CHORUS. 

ii. SONG. Old and Young Marie Coweu 

MISS FRANKLIN. 

12. CHORUS. May Song Franz 

MIXED CHORUS. 

Monday, March 19, Prof. Bragdon took about 
eighty-five of the girls to the Blind Institution. 
It was a sad sight, though we were much inter- 
ested in the readiness with which the blind took 
their parts in the programme which had been pre- 
pared for us in both the boys' and girls' depart- 
ments. Most of us met Laura Bridgeman. 

The second lecture on Venice, by Rev. Francis 
Tiffany, was delivered on March 21. He dwelt 
principally upon what the Venetians do with their 
wealth. 

On Tuesday evening, March 27, a recital was 
given by the pupils of Professors Davis and Hills. 

The self-governed and roll-of-honor lists were 
read, after a word or two from Prof. Bragdon, on 
March 28. We are glad to say the former list 
is much larger than last term. 



J 34 



Lasell Leaves. 



We have been told that a bore and a cooking 
lecture are synonymous. Another definition of a 
bore might be, one who insists upon talking of 
himself when you want to be talking of yourself. 

The military drill is rapidly progressing, under 
the supervision of Capt. Benyon. The officers 
elected are as follows : Major, Lina A. Jones ; 
Adjutant, Grace W. Skinner. Company A : Cap- 
tain, Lulie Hogg ; Lieutenant, Sue J. Brown ; 
First Sergeant, Elizabeth Campbell. Company B : 
Captain, Josephine Bogart; Lieutenant, Delia 
Fowler; First Sergeant, Mary Beckwith. 

If young ladies wish to purchase wash lists at 
fairs, it might be well for them to mention whether 
they desire a gentleman's or lady's list. 

The two or three steps on the third floor 
near the linen-room should either be removed or 
a danger light placed there in the evening. Is 
the stumbling up these steps, by those meandering 
in the halls in the wee sma' hours, caused " by a 
tack " or by the want of tact ? 

With Easter came a bright, beautiful day. The 
girls who remained at the Seminary during vaca- 
tion went into Boston to services. 

Echo Bridge was visited by some of those who 
remained at the Seminary at Easter time, and 
many attended the concerts at Newton,- given by 
the Yale and Amherst Glee Clubs. 

Teacher of Sanitation. " Can any one tell me 
the difference between an open fire and a stove ? " 

Bright Girl in the back seat. " Why, of 
course. There is a grate difference." 



PERSONALS. 

Mary Haskhll is visiting Helen Underwood 
in Chicago. 

Prof. Bragdon left, March 15, for New York, 
with his brother, who is en route for Europe. 

We hear that Ida Northrop, who was here in 
1874, has married a widower, and lives at Sharon, 
Conn. 

Mrs. Hattie Lathrop Baker, formerly of 
Waterbury, Conn., is about to move to St. Paul, 
Minn. 

Mrs. Ella Steadman Frank and her husband 
have just returned from a five-months' trip 
abroad. 



We are happy to add to the list of Lasell girls 
since last term Miss Lucy Pennell, of Portland, 
Me., Miss Mary Packard, of Boston, Mass., and 
Miss Louise Harvey, of Chicago, 111. 

Edith Gale has recovered her health and en- 
gaged a place for next year, if still well. 

Sallie Head has recently visited Clara White 
in New York. Clara is now very well. 

We hear that Lizzie Burnham is " very happy, 
as usual." 

The hearty congratulations of Lasell friends 
are hereby sent to Mrs. Emma Johnson Borden, 
in response to the little card, 

"Bolden Lee Borden, March 15, 1888." 

The address is 1434 S Street, N. W., Wash- 
ington, D. C. 

Mr. Charles Ebersole, of Yale University, 
spent the Easter vacation with his sister Caroline, 

Mr. and Mrs Van Horn made their daughter 
Maud a short visit April 5. 

Clara Bowen's mother was with her two or 
three days in April. 

The fathers of Helen White and Annie Gage 
were here the first of the vacation. 

Gertrude Irving Cary, now Mrs. Dr. Will 
O. Campbell, of 3137 Clifton Place, St. Louis, 
writes pleasant words for Lasell Leaves from 
her happy home. 

Susie M. Cord made us a brief visit in Easter 
vacation. She hopes to join the Lasell European 
party as far as Dresden, where she will stay for 
some time with her aunt now there. 

Married in Detroit, Mich., April n, Miss 
Minnie F. Pick and Mr. Horace J. Caulkins. 

Miss Larrison is having a comfortable year in 
Buffalo. She reports a pleasant visit from Miss 
Louisa Holman Richardson as she returned to 
Carleton this spring; that our old pastor, Dr. 
Bashford, is preaching fine sermons at the best 
M. E. church in B. (hope he will keep humble !) ; 
that Anna Baker had a grand wedding lately, and 
Jennie is fixing for another ; that she saw Emma 
Russell in a store and Lizzie Whipple at the wed- 
ding ! 

Alice Magoun is improving remarkably in 
health, having taken the " sudden start " she has 
so long threatened. We are very glad. 



Lasell Leaves. 



!35 



Mary Bailey, our " May," of Danielsonville, 
Conn., is going to marry John W. Newell, at one 
o'clock, April 26. May the day be bright and the 
promises distinct ! 

What do you think ? Ida Sibley is engaged to 
Hattie Webber's brother. Good ! 



SEND THE BABIES! 

Dear Gir/s, — I have received some fine photo- 
graphs of some splendid babies since I asked 
for the " Lasell Grandchildren," but they do not 
come fast enough. I am afraid you will put it off 
and forget it, and perhaps I will never get the 
pictures. Nowputyour ring on the other finger, tie 
your handkerchief around your waist, and have 
the pictures taken, and send one to me sure. The 
dear little things ! How cute they look ! 

C. C. B. 

AMATEUR PHOTOGRAPHIC OUTFITS, 

All Sizes and Styles at Lowest Prices. 

JBElNrj. FRENGTrl <fe CO. 

319 Washington Street - - Boston, Mass. 



SHREVE, CRUMP k LOW, 



432 WASHINGTON ST. 



BOSTON. 



Q ewelr ij, 
finest (r otter u. 



EMERSON 



FINEST TONE, 

BEST WORK AND 

MATERIAL. 



Established in 1849. 




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50,000 Made 

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Every Instrument Fully Warranted. 



PRICES MODERATE AND TERMS 
REASONABLE. 



PIANOS. 



ILLUSTRATED CATALOGUES FREE. 



EMERSON PIANO CO. - BOSTON, MASS. 




BOSEPH £1 LL@¥T*S 

■*• steel** pews. 

f THE FAVORITE NUMBERS, 303,404, 332,351, 170, 
/ AND HIS OTHER STYLES 

SOLD by ALL DEALERS throughout the WORLDS 




136 



Lasell Leaves. 




BLANKET WRAPS FOR BABY. 

Blanket wraps for the nursery, the bath, the 
sick room, or steamer travelling, for men, women, 
children, and the baby, at Noyes Bros'. 

Morning and evening wedding outfits in shirts, 
collars, cravats, and gloves a specialty, at Noyes 
Bros'. 

English mackintosh coats for ladies and gentle- 
men, at Noyes Bros'. 

English silk umbrellas in gold, silver, and natural 
wood handles, ladies' and men's, $2.75 to $35 00, 
very rare and choice designs, at Noyes Bros'. 



Lawn Tennis and Yachting Suits. 

Flannel, 
Madras, 
English, 
Cheviots ( 
and Silk \ 
Shirtings / 



For Travelling Shirts, 

" Railway Cars, 

" Steamer Wear, 

" House Night Wraps, 

" Bath or Sick Room, 

" Hunting and Fishing, 

" Lawn Tennis, 

" Office and House Coats. 



NOYES BROS. 

Lawn Tennis shirts, coats, trousers, belts, 
sashes, and caps, ladies' blouse waists, from 
best English and French Flannels and Oxfords, 
at Noyes Bros'. 

Boys' Waists in Flannels, Cheviots, and Ox- 
fords; Flannel Office Coats, English Hold-alls, 
Steamer Wraps and Rugs, at Noyes Bros'. 

English Travelling Rugs for railway and 
steamer use, $3.75 to $50.00, at Noyes Bros'. 

English Dressing-gowns, Study Coats, House 
Coats and Office Coats, and Long Wraps, $5.00 
to $45.00, in stock or to measure, at Noyes 
Bros'. 

NOYES BROS., 

Hosiers, Glovers, and Shirt Makers, 

WASHINGTON AND SUMMER STREETS, 
BOSTON, U. S. A. 



DRESS SHIRTS 

For Weddings and Receptions. 

The present fashion of Shirts, with Linen 
Cords, Embroidered Figures, and Spot Bosoms, 
may be had of Noyes Bros., most thoroughly 
and elegantly made. 

We have a Special Department for Re- 
pairing Shirts, Hosiery, Underwear, Gloves, 
or any article belonging to Gentlemen; can be 
laundered and repaired at short notice, at Noyes 
Bros'. 

There are 81 offices in Boston who advertise 
Troy Laundry. Messrs. Noyes Bros, are 
the only house in Boston that actually sends 
goods there. 

We send the work every day, and return in 
five days, and give new goods for any damaged. 

Special Laundry Department for 

Dress Shirts, Vests, and Wash-Scarfs. Re- 
laundered equal to new goods, at Noyes Bros'. 

Family Laundry Work called for and 
returned with no extra charge. 



NOYES BROS., 

Hosiers, Glovers, and Shirt Makers, 

WASHINGTON AND SUMMER STREETS, 
BOSTON, MASS., U. S. A. 



ESTABLISHED 1817. 



JOHN H. PRAY, SONS & CO. 

Importers, Joiers, Retailers anil Manufacturers' Agents. 

Carpetings, Mattings, Oil Cloth, 

ORIENTAL RUGS, 

CARPETS AND UPHOLSTERY. 



558 and 560 Washington St., 

30 to 34 Harrison Ave. Extension, 



BOSTON. 



113 Worth. Street 



NKW YORK. 



Lasell Leaves. 



137 



A. STOWELL & CO. 

24 Winter Street, Boston. 



£oirie of our Specialties : 

Bohemian Garnet Jewelry. 
Amber Beads and Ornaments. 
Tortoise-Shell Hair Pins. 
Choice Leather Goods. 
Oxidized Silver Jewelry. 
Fans for all occasions. 
Pearl Opera Glasses. 
Fine Gold Jewelry. 

Wedding Presents in Clocks, Vases and 
Bronzes. 

LATEST NOVELTIES IN ALL DEPARTMENTS. 
Lowest Prices. 



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YOUNG LADIES' 

BOOTS, SHOES AND SLIPPERS, 

Stylish and Durable at Moderate Prices. 

GYMNASIUM SHOES A SPECIALTY. 

Thayer, McNeil 8c Hodgkins, 



47 TEMPLE PL. 



BOSTON 



The thoroughness of construction, elasticity of 
action, depth, sonority, and singing quality of tone, 
evenness in all the registers, and unrivalled artistic 
designs in cases have made the 

HALLET & DAVIS HAND 

the favored instrument in such celebrated institutions 
as the Lasell Seminary, Leipsic Conservatory of 
Music, Chicago Musical College, New England 
Conservatory of Music, and the musical public 
generally. 

WAREROOMS, 

179 TP^EfvlONT STREET, 

Boston, Mass. 



C. B. Woods. 



H. J. Wood. 



C. B. WOODS & CO. 



MANUFACTURERS OF 



Fine Furniture, 

Upholstery, Draperies, Wood Mantels 
and Interior Finish. 

OFFICE AND WAREROOMS, 

105 and 107 Chauncy Street, Boston. 



JOHN J. O'BRIEN, 

Picture Frames 

01 Every Description, Wholesale aiid Retail. 

OL3D FEAMES !R, IE C3- 1 ID T . 

69 CORN H1LL, BOSTON. 

ESTABLISHED 1840. 

Isaac Locke & Company, 

Produce Commission Merchants, 

And Praters in 

FOREIGN and DOMESTIC FRUITS 

97, 99 and 101 Fanenil Hall Market, and Basement 18 sontn Side, 

BOSTON - - • MASS. 

Telephone Connection 



138 



Lasell Leaves. 



xWEBERS^ 



25, 27 TEMPLE PLACE 



BOSTON, 



A.1NTD 33 WEST STREET, 

Ladies' and Gents' Restaurant, 

Oysters and Salads a Specialty. 

OPEN AFTER THEATRES. 

Caterer for Wedding Breakfasts, Lunches, Dinner and Evening Parties 

and Receptions. Also, Club Suppers at Short Notice 

and Reasonable Prices. 

S. W. BAILEY, 

— DEALER IN — 

WATCHES, JEWELRY, SILVERWARE, ETC. 

353 Washington Street, Boston. 

Jewelry Neatly Repaired. Also, Monograms on Coin Pieces. Personal 
Attention given to Repairing Fine Watches. 

ESTABLISHED 1847- 



AARON R. GAY & CO. 

No. 122 State Street, Boston, 

STATIONERS 

AND 

BLANK BOOK MANUFACTURERS, 



First-Class Account Books of any desired 
pattern made to order. 

S. S. GAY. EDWIN W. GAY. 

JUST WHAT HAS BEEN WANTED, 

A LADIES' LUNCH ROOM 

HAS BEEN OPENED AT 

23 AVON STREET, BOSTON. 

A quiet, neat place, where a nice Lunch can be had at a very reason- 
able price. All the ladies say, " Isn't it nice ?" 

T. D. COOK, Caterer. 

ALSO, 

"Wedding and other Parties 

Served with the Choicest Viands, and by Competent Waiters. 

SUPERIOR ICE-CREAM 

DELIVERED AT REASONABLE PRICES. 



THE 



-■¥ 



YOUTH'S COMPANION, 

A WEEKLY PAPER FOR 

YOUNG PEOPLE and the FAMILY, 

It aims to be a favorite in every family — looked for eagerly 
by the young folks, and read with interest by the older. Its purpose is to 
interest while it amuses; to be judicious, practical, sensible, and to have 
really permanent worth, while it attracts for the hour. 

It is handsomely illustrated, ar.d has for contributors some of 
the most attractive writers in the country. 

Subscription Price, $1.75. Specimen copies sent free. Please 
mention in what paper you read this advertisement. 

PERRY MASON &. CO. 

41 TEMPLE PLACE, BOSTON, MASS. 



FINE FURS. 

The best quality of all kinds of Furs in popular use. 

Seal English Jackets, 

Seal Dolman Wraps. 

Seal Sacques. 

We give particular attention to orders by measure, and using the 
richest and most durable of genuine Alaska Seals, assure the fullest 
satisfaction in quality and fit. 

The fashionable 

BLACK BEAR BOAS, 

of exquisite fineness and beauty, made from skins of rare quality. 

Fur Collars, Capes, Cuffs, Boas, 

Hats, Sleighing Hoods and Gloves 

FUR TRIMMINGS. 



Gentlemen'' s Fur-lined Overcoats. 



Fur Mats and Carriage Robes. 



Joseph A. Jackson, 



412 Washington Street 



Boston. 



Established 1H25. 

NATHAN NEAT & CO. 

MANUFACTURERS OF 



HUNKS AND TRAVELLING BAGS. 

BASKET TRUNKS AND STEAMER CHAIRS. 
Stateroom and Light-Weight Trunks for European Travel. 



SEND FOR ILLUSTRATED CATALOGUE. 



^66 WASHINGTON ST., BOSTON, MASS. 

EElAHfTORlTi! 

At Popular Prices. 



F. M. HOLMES FURNITURE CO., 

116 TREMONT ST., BOSTON, MASS. 



LEVI S. GOULD. 



FRANK A. PATCH. 



Lasell Leaves. 



139 



EDWIN C. BURT & CO.'S 

FINE SHOES AND SLIPPERS 

FOR LADIES AND CHILDREN 

ARE THE BEST SHOES MADE. 



Fit Perfectly 
Easy on the Feet. 
Superior in Style 



Cost no More 



Other 
:,ie Shoes. 




For sale by leading retail shoe dealers in nearly every city throughout the United States and 
Canada. All widths of Lasts, any style of Shoe, Sole, Toe, or Heel. If you cannot 
get our make of shoes from your dealers, send address for directions how to procure them. 

EDWIN C. BURT & CO., Manufacturers, 

ZN~IEW YORK. 

SPECIAL AOENTS IN BOSTON, 

JORDAN, MARSH & CO., WASH INGTON ST. 



Mr. JOSEPH A. HILLS 

has removed to more commo- 
dious music rooms in 

Hotel Pelham, 

Cor. "Fremont and Boylston Sts., 

BOSTON, MASS., 

where he will be pleased to meet 
his pupils and others for pro- 
fessional engagements. 

Competent assistants under Mr. 
Hills' s supervision will attend to 
the instruction of those less ad- 
vanced who may desire lessons 
at reduced rates. 



Conductors, Concert, Opera and 
Church Singers, Pianists, Organ- 
ists, Accompanists and Teachers 
supplied at the 

TEACHERS' BUREAU 

HOTEL PELHAM, 

BOSTON, MASS. 



CONOVER BROTHERS' CO. 

piapofort^/Hapufy 

14th St. and 9th Ave., New York. 

Clear, silvery, even tone through- 
out. Durable and elegant design. 
Indorsed by the profession. 

BOSTON WAREROOMS, 

Hotel Pelham. 



THE "PEERLESS" FOUNTAIN PEN 




IS THE PERFECTION OF FOUNTAIN PENS. 

Is a hard rubber holder fitted with a 16 k. gold pen of the best manufacture, and will never wear out. It will write ten thousand words with one 
tilling of ink, and for taking lectures, etc., it is indispensable. There is no loss of time in dipping ink as with the ordinary pen, as the " Peerless " 
has a perfect, even and uninterrupted How of ink, and is the best fountain pen manufactured. Price, !$2.00. 

The Cross Stylographic Pen, Stylographic Ink. All styles of Stylographic, Fountain, and Gold Tens repaired. 



THE CROSS PEN CO., 306 Washington St. 



BOSTON, MASS. 



iTEST DOOE TO OLD SO"JTH CX-X ~ SCH. 



140 



Lasell Leaves. 



C. H. CODMAN & CO. 

Photographic Material, 

PICTURE and FRAME DEALERS' 

<A SUPPLIES >> 
Wholesale and Retail Framing 

AMATEUR PHOTOGRAPHIC APPARATUS. 

34 BROMFIELD STREET, 

BOSTON - - - MASS. 

W. H. FRENCH & CO. 

PLUMBERS, GAS FITTERS, 

AND 

SANITARY ENGINEEES. 

JUDSON'S BUILDING, OPP. RAILROAD STATION, 
WEST NEWTON. 



All Work Promptly Attended to and Warranted Satisfactory, 



LIVERY, HACK : 



■ ANT>- 



BOARDING STABLE. 

ESTABLISHED 1861. 

S. F. CATE, WEST NEWTON 



Barge " City of Newton." 

Boat Sleigh "Snow Bird." 



H. H. NEWELL, 



DEALER IN 



BOOTS, SHOESf RUBBERS, 

Auburn Street, Auburndale, Mass. 



New York and Beyond, 

via FALL RIVER LINE. 



ONLY $3 FOR FIRST-CLASS LIMITED TICKETS. 



SPECIAL EXPRESS leaves Boston from Old Colony Station daily 
(Sundays excepted) at 6 p. m., connecting at Fall River (49 miles) in 75 
minutes with the steamers Bristol and Providence. Heated throughout 
by steam and lighted by electricity. An orchestra on each steamer. Due 
to arrive in New York about 7.30 a. m ; connection to Brooklyn and Jersey 
City by annex boat. Returning, leave New York daily (Sundays ex- 
cepted) at 4.30 p. m. Baggage checked from hotel or residence in Boston 
to destination. Tickets, State-rooms, etc., secured at the Line office, No. 
3 Old State House, and at the Old Colony Station. 



L. H. PALMER, 

Agt., 3 Old State House. 



J. R. KENDRICK, 

General Manager. 



AljU-IClSr <fe BARRY, 

House and Sign Painters, GTazing, G-raining, 

Kalsomining and. "Whitening. 

Paints, Oils and "Varnishes constantly on hand. 

WASHINGTON ST. (near R. R. Crossing), WEST NEWTON. 



C. T. Allen. 



D. Barry. 



H. H. HUNT, 

CARPENTER AND BUILDER, 



WEST NEW" 
Shop near R. R. Crossing. 



"ON, MASS. 

P.O. Box 235. 



WAPH % P(l CARRIAGE AND WAGON BUILDERS, 
l¥ nili) (X UUi. Cor. Elm and Washington Sts., near City Hall, 

"WEST NEWTON". 

Fine Carriages and Wagons of any description built to order and War- 
ranted to give satisfaction. Carriage Painting and Repairing iin all its 
branches promptly and thoroughly executed at fair prices. The Repair- 
ing of Fine Carriages a Specialty. 

Carriages Sent for and Returned Free of Charge. 

Boston Gossamer Rubber Co. 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

Gossamer Clothing. 

LEATHER COATS AND VESTS, 

HOOP-SKIRTS AND BUSTLES. 

611 Washington St,, Boston, Mass. 

S. KLOUS, Treasurer. 

B, G. BAKER, 

COAL AND WOOD, 

Auburndale and West Newton. 



Lasell Leaves. 




THOMAS HALL, 

Electrician 



-AXS- 



Optician. 



Haaafaetamand Importer at 

Talerrapklc, Electric, Mag; - 

netic, GalTsalc, Optieal 

sad Meteorological 

Imstnuncati. 

Chmieali, Chemletl msd Philo- 
sophies! App«r«tu» of »U Descrip- 
tion!. Ulu.trated Catalogue of 
each DepartBMst. 

HaU's PaL Medical Batteries. 
19 BROMFIELD ST., BOSTON, MASS. 

1388, PittM Pwil, ft. 1819, Pslaw * HilL IBM, Taomsi BsU. 

WADSWORTH <fc PICKERING, 

COMMISSION MERCHANTS, AND JOBBERS IN 

BUTTER, CHEESE, EGGS, ETC. 

STALL, 89 QUINCY MARKET, BOSTON. 



Bujggs Wadsworth. 



F. A. PlCICBRlNG- 



CHARLES H. WHITING, Formerly Hall & Whiting, 
Stationer and Blank book Manufacturer 

Importer and Jobber. Publisher and Book Seller. School and Miscel- 
laneous Books. Crane's Fine Stationery. American, English, French 
and German Fancy and Staple Stationery. Weston's Ledger Papers. 

169 and 170 Devonshire Street, Boston. 



FROST & ADAMS, 

ImgntuM •*, as* WMaaal* aa4 R*UB !>««J«t« la 

ARTISTS' MATERIALS, 

DECORATIVE ART NOVELTIES, ART 
POTTERY, ETC. 

jatfifstif? Outfit* £ of nVs^y iCijta 



Ebonized Panels. 

Winsor & Newton's Colors. 

German Colors. 

French Colors. 

Tucker & Green's Colors. 

Sketch Blocks. 

Plaques of all kinds. 

China Colors. 

Mirrors for Decorating. 

Artists' Boxes. 

Artists' Brushes. 

Artists' Canvas. 

Handbooks on Art. 

Studies of all kinds. 

Lustra Painting Materials. 



Water-Colors. 

Bronzes. 

Brocades. 

Spangles. 

China for Decorating. 

Paper Panels. 

Tambourines. 

Repousse Material*. 

Canvas Stretched. 

Drawing Instruments. 

Plaque Rims. 

Artists' Easels. 

Drawing Paper. 

Materials for Tapestry, ate. 

Kensington Painting Materials. 



SCHOOLS & STUDENTS SUPPLIED 

AT LOW FIGURES. 

37 CORNHILL - - BOSTON. 

SEND FOR A CATALOGUE. 
F. S. F«ost. H. A. Lawrkncb. 



ELLIOT W. KEYES, 

APOTHECARY, 

Haskins' Block - - - Auburn Street, 
ausurndale, mass. 

FALL AND WINTER MILLINERY. 

MRS. M. H. KIMBALL., 

Dealer in FRENCH FLOWERS, HATS, BONNETS and TRIMMINGS, 

MELROSE STREET, AUBURNDALE. 

V. A. PLUTA^ 

Dealer in PROVISIONS, 

Cor. Auburn and Lexington Streets. 

ALFRED BRUSH, 

APOTHECARY, 

Plummer's Block, Cor. of Auburn and Lexington Sts. 

auburndale. 

n. w. farley. g. d. harvey. a. c. farley. 

FARLEY, HARVEY & CO. 

Importers and Jobbers of 

JD^-Z- * G-OODS. 

61 and 67 Chauncey, 39, 41 and 43 Bedford Sts., BOSTON. 

FARNUM &. COMPANY, 
PRODUCE COMMISSION MERCHANTS, 

Wholesale Dealers in Apples, Potatoes, Cranberries, Onions, Peas, 

Beans, Dried Apples, Oranges and Lemons. 

Nos. 108 and no Faneuil Hall Market - - BOSTON. 

Henry Farnum. W. W. Lawrence. 



GEORGE E. JOHNSON, 



■DEALER IN- 



Hay, Grain and Feed, 

Lexington Street, 
AUBURNDALE, MASS. 

CHARLES G. TINKHAM, 

Livery, Had and Boarding Stal, 

Cor. of Lexington and Severn Sts., 
AITBITMDALE. 

JOHNSTON & KEYES. 

AUBURNDALE AND BOSTON EXPRESS. 



BOSTON OFFICES, 

105 Arch Street, 
34 Court Square. 



AUBURNDALE OFFICE, 

Lexington. Street, 
Near the Depot 



H. EUGENE FLEMING, PH. G. 

PHARMACIST, 

FINE CONFECTIONERY a Specialty. 

Near City Hall - - West Newton, Mass. 



MAY, 1888. 




L/^ELX lEfw/qs 



VOLUME XIII. -No. 8. 



CONTENTS. 



Editorials 143 

Juniata Boat Club 146 

Nothing 146 

Lasellia Entertainment . . > . . . .147 

The Jewess in Fiction 148 

Two New Paintings 151 

Scientific Notes . . 151 



Spring, a Poem 152 

Art Notes 152 

Political Notes 152 

Major and Minor 152 

Exchanges 153 

Locals 153 

Personals 154 



Lasell Leaves. 



NOVELTIES 



■IN- 



MILLINERY 



RECEIVED DAILY FROM PARIS and LONDON, 



I ARTHUR P. SCHMIDT & CO. 

IMPORTERS OF AMD DEALERS IN 

FOREIGN AND AMERICAN 



Sheet Music 



Ladies are invited to call and examine before purchasing 
elsewhere. Correct Styles. Popular prices. 



HENRY M. BURR &■ CO. 



490 Washington Street, 



BOSTON. 



Sole Agents lor Mrs celebrated MM or 

Classical and Modern Music. 

13 AND 15 WEST ST., BOSTON. 

Catalogues sent free on application. 

LAWRENCE, WILDE & CO. 

Manufacturers ef First-Clast 

FURNITURE 



AND 



INTERIOR DECORATIONS, 

Nos. 38 to 48 CornMll - - Boston. 



A. Lawrbncb. 
Wm. H. Hull. 



Gbo. B. Darsow. 
F. D. Wilbb. 



ESTABLISHED 1830- 



ALFRED MUDGE & SON, 

PRINTERS, 

No. 24 FRANKLIN STREET, BOSTON, MASS. 

HAVE UNSURPASSED FACILITIES FOR 

BOOK AND MISCELLANEOUS PRINTING, 

ELECTROTYPING AND STEREOTYPING, 

MERCANTILE AND COMMERCIAL PRINTING, 

FANCY BALL AND SOCIETY PRINTING. 



LAW WORK A SPECIALTY. 

fl FULL LINE OF WEDDING STATIONERY ENGRAVED OR PRINTED. 

WEDDING OUTFITS executed in the finest manner at reasonable prices. 

Information regarding work in any department will at all times be promptly furnished, either 
personally or by correspondence. 

ALFRED MUDGE X SON, 24 FRANKLIN STREET. 



Las ell Leaves. 



141 



CD. COBB & BROS. 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 

GROCERIES 

Of the Very Finest Quality, 

And IMPORTERS of 

^aFANCY GRADES TEAS 8- 

Every Article Warranted. 



Orders of $20 and. upwards Delivered at any 
point within lOO miles of Boston. 



FOE PARTICULARS, SEND FOR CATALOGUE TO 

C. D. Cobb & Bros. 

722 to 732 Washington Street, 
BOSTON - - - MASS. 



T. E. MOSELEY & CO. 



DEALERS IN 




, SHOES, RUBBERS, ETC. 



FOR LADIES, GENTLEMEN, BOYS, 
MISSES AND CHILDREN. 

A Large Assortment for 

YOUNG LHDIES. 



GYMNASIUM SHOES 

In Great Variety. 

ENGLISH LAST WALKING BOOTS, 

In CALF or GOAT, 
Are SENSIBLE, DURABLE, and REASONABLE in Price. 



T. E. MOSELEY & CO. 

469 Washington Street, 



COBB, BATES & YERXA, 

IMPORTERS 



AND 



GROCERS. 



Twenty-dollar orders delivered free at any station 
within 50 miles of Boston, and fifty-dollar orders at 
any station in New England, at our regular retail prices. 



COBB, BATES k YERXA, 

680 to 692 Washington Street, 
3 Bowdoin Square, 

6 and 8 Faneuil Hall Square. 

Also in 

CHELSEA, FALL RIVER and TAUNTON. 



BOSTON, 



GOOD MUSI C FOR ALL THE YEA R ROUND. 

Is found in such books as the following, which, when kept at hand, fur- 
nish unfailing entertainment for the player or singer. 

Song Classics for Low Voices. 

(one dollar.) 
About 50 Gems of Song by the best modern composers ; Rubinstein, 
Lassen, Grieg, Gounod and others. A true treasure for Alto, Baritone 
and Bass Voices. 

SOUNTG- CLASSICS. 

(one dollar.) 

For voices of average compass. All selected from the best sources. 

PLAJNTO CLASSICS. 

(ONE DOLLAR.) 

_ An admirable collection of pieces in the best taste, by some of the best 
living composers. 

YOUNG- PEOPLE'S CLASSICS. 

(ONE DOLLAR.) 
Easy pieces that will please all, young or old. 

The Good Old. Songs We XJsed to Sing. 

($1.00 paper; $1.25 BDS.) 
A grand good new book, which will be received with open arms in* 
every household. About 120 songs, with piano or organ accompaniment. 
Each one has been a distinguished success. Many are new to the pres- 
ent generation. Mailed for Retail Price. 

OLIVER DITSON & CO., BOSTON. 

GEO. E. ALLEK 

12 Winter Street - - - - Boston. 

TRIMMINGS, BUTTONS, LACES, YARNS, CORSETS, 

AND FANCY GOODS. 



YOUNG 



S HOTEL, 



EUROPEAN PLAN. 



OPPOSITE THE HEAD OF STATE STREET, BOSTOIT. 

Ladies' entrance, Court Street, near Washington Street. 

J. R. WHIPPLE, PROPRIETOR 



142 



Lasell Leaves. 



HASTINGS. 



Qhr OP 



HOTOGRAPHER. 



Yffle offer io irjc (®J>aduafirig o:r)Gl U.r)der 
'©lasses, ar)d also io trjeir rjurrjerous frierjds, 
urjusual advantages, bofrj jor excellence g[ 

PHOTOGRAPHIC WORK 

arjd reasonable prices. w c guarantee ir)e 

rnosl e/lrtisfic If roaucfiorjs irjadc. 



No. 147 Tremont Street 



corner of West Street, 



BOSTON 



MASS. 



LADIES' FINE FOOTWEAR. 



We have added for Spring and Summer, many new lines, in- 
cluding specialties of which we have exclusive control. 



GYMNASIUM SHOES, 
WEDDING AND PARTY 
BOOTS AND SLIPPERS. 



HENRY H. TUTTLE & CO. 

43 B Washington Street, 
BOSTON. 




THE CLASSY 



,„,^il^„„ 



PHOTOGRAPHER 



For Lasell Seminary, 
-♦'88**- 



Studio, 22 Winter Street, 



BOSTON. 



LASELL LEAVES 



DUX FEMINA FACTI. 



Volume XII 



LASELL SEMINARY, ADBURNDALE, MASS,, MAY, 1BBB. 



PumbEr 



LASELL LEAVES. 



Published Monthly, during the School Year, 



Lasell Publishing Association 



OF 



LASELL SEMINARY FOR YOUNG WOMEN, 



Auburndale, Mass. 



Editor-in- Ch ief. 
DAISY E. LLOYD. 

Local Editor. 
ALLIE GARDNER. 



Political Ed it 07'. 
SUSAN J. DAY. 

Musical Editor. 
LUCY SARGEANT. 

Exchange Editor. 
IRENE CUSHMAN. 



Scientific Editor. 
MAI3EL RAUM, '89. 

Art Editor. 
EDITH A. ELLIS. 

Business Manager. 
LINA A. JONES, '88. 



Sid>scriftion Agent. 
BLANCHE PRUYNE. 



TERMS, IN ADVANC! 
One Copy, one year (including postage) 



Single Numbers 



$1.00 
15 CIS. 



ADVERTISING RATES. 



SPACE. 


3 MONTHS. 


6 MONTHS. 


9 MONTHS. 


1,-12 column .... 


*1.50 


#2.50 


#3-5° 


1-6 " .... 


3.00 


5.OO 


7.00 


1-4 " .... 


4.OO 


6.5O 


9.00 


1-2 " .... 


6.5O 


II.OO 


15.00 


3-4 .... 


9.OO 


I5.OO 


20.00 


• " • • 


I2.00 


I9.OO 


25.00 



Press of Alfred Mudge &■> Sou, 24 Franklin St., Boston. 



We have been fortunate in having the oppor- 
tunity of listening to a number of very interesting 
lectures this term — a privilege we highly appre 
dated. The first course was given by Miss A. 
S. Scull, the former principal of a young ladies' 
school in Philadelphia. The subject was one al- 
most wholly unexplored by us, and the lectures 
proved delightfully interesting, as well as bene- 
ficial. 

The evening of April 12, Miss Scull devoted to 
" Events, Fabulous and Historic, which mark the 
unfolding of the Heroic Period ; Dodona ; the 
Trojan War ; the Cycle of CEdipus ; the ' Finds ' 
at Mycenae and Tiryus ; Centres of Worship at 
Olympia, Delphi, and Athens." 

The second lecture was given the next morn- 
ing, and in this we learned mucrf'that was 
interesting concerning (w The Shrines and Temples 
of Ancient Hellas." 

The third and last lecture, treating of "The 
Footsteps of Athens," was listened to on the even- 
ing of May 12. 

The many stereopticon views added greatly to 
the interest of the lectures, and made everythino- 
appear more realistic to us. We admired Miss 
Scull very much when we learned that she had 
procured most of the views herself, with the aid of 
an amateur photographer's outfit. We can see 
now that it would certainly be worth while to 
devote our spare moments to the study of photog- 
raphy, when one can achieve such satisfactory 
results with one's camera. 

Miss Scull's work is truly worthy of praise ; and 
we enjoyed very much the charming faces and 
views in the different cities which she kindly 
showed us. It is almost needless to say that Miss 
Scull would receive a warm welcome were she to 
visit us again. 

The second course of lectures, on the evenings 
of April 25 and May 2, was given by Miss O. M. 



144 



Lasell Leaves. 



Rowe. The subject chosen was " The Twelve 
Great Pictures." 

On the first evening six of the pictures were 
shown to us, beginning with Titian's Assumption, 
and ending with Michael Angelo's Last Judgment. 
Each part of the paintings was very carefully and 
thoroughly explained, enabling us to get a clear 
idea of the whole. The pictures of the different 
artists were placed before us, and a short sketch 
of their lives given, so that we learned something 
of the painters of these masterpieces. 

May 2, the lecture began with Leonardo da 
Vinci, and ended with Raphael. 

Miss Rowe's lectures were beautifully written, 
and read in clear, pleasant tones, which held the 
attention of all. 



One night we were seized with a mood most 
reflective, and, among other things, pondered over 
the report now current relative to a uniform dress 
for Lasell girls. After long-drawn-out contempla- 
tion, we wonder why this would not be a happy 
thing if carried into effect. How fine to have 
a costume for work, as nowadays we have for 
gymnastics, tennis, riding, etc. ! It would only be 
carrying out the modern idea of the correct thing, 
if we did do so. What a startling effect we would 
have upon each other, if some bright morning we 
should sail slowly — oxfastly, as is usual — down the 
stairs to breakfast arrayed in an Oxford gown, or 
some costume with as intellectual a style about it. 
What a transformation ! The dining-room door 
could never have the bravado to swing shut just 
as we put our number nines on the last stair if 
such imposing figures confronted it. When we were 
seated, no one can tell what would take place ; we 
might forget ourselves, and greet each other in 
Siamese or Old Indian. (Siamese is here substi- 
tuted for Volapiik, in order to give that word a 
much-needed rest.) 

If we possessed a gown consecrated to work 
alone, we would certainly have the advantage of 
being better equipped for work than ever before, 
and as a matter of course, work, setting all pleas- 
ure aside for the time being — ! 

Naturally, our first duty in the morning would be 
the discussion of breakfast, and, following the ex- 
ample of Gladstone, we might cheerfully give each 
mouthful at that meal the slow process — thirty- 



two chews — thereby gaining a digestion so good 
there would be no harm done if we ate anything 
set before us. We would continue doing every- 
thing in this admirably systematic manner during 
the day. No doubt the moment we assumed the 
wonderful gown there would be imbued into us a 
liking for study and school routine, most conducive 
to a learned mind ; a feeling which, to our knowl- 
edge, the majority of us have as yet never, never 
experienced. Some one tells us that clothing 
absorbs our thoughts, our moods ; and if this be 
true, no doubt our lessons are absorbed in their turn. 
If we wished to learn a lesson, all we would have 
to do would be to set our minds upon it, give the 
private residence of this particular lesson a slight 
poke to wake it up, and begin : all the knowledge 
stored away in the gown would come to our minds ; 
and how this would facilitate matters when once 
we were started on the right track ! 

Evening coming on, we would dress for a late 
dinner ; that over, go up-stairs and spend an 
evening of pleasant recreation ; all thought of to- 
morrow's lessons thrown aside with our working 
gown, and with nothing left to disturb our well- 
earned peace of mind, what an air of elegant 
leisure would pervade these classic walls ! Next 
day we would do as we had done the clay before. 

The uniform dress, with all its attendant advan- 
tages, may come before '' Lasell's millennium," if 
the costume is not to be decided upon by the girls. 
We learn from the lamentable experience of the 
pin, that this is not the most rapid way of arriving 

at decisions. 

>-•-< 

It was our misfortune that the April Leaves 
went on its way marred by mistakes. " What are 
you going to do about it? " some one asks ; and 
we make answer that all we can do is to make 
amends by an apology, and a few words of our 
own, as usual, gratuitous. 

We are greatly grieved that our agreeable con- 
tributors have seriously neglected one useful 
branch of study, i. <?., penmanship, making it 
almost impossible for us to translate their writing 
into good or bad English sentences. We can only 
say to them that some vital change is necessary 
now or never. 

The poor unfortunates dubbed " proof-readers" 
venture to say that they, very innocently, caused 



Lasell Leaves. 



HS 



some of the above-mentioned mistakes. They are 
at present laboring under disadvantageous advan- 
tages. Their rusticity received a blow in the eyes 
the evening they walked into chapel, and had the 
electric light sprung upon them for the first time. 
Things have looked somewhat double, even triple, 
to them ever since. Then the art lectures came, 
with stereopticon illustrations, and they felt it their 
duty to fasten their already dazzled orbs on the 
glaring white sheet before them, at the same time 
fighting against a foolish longing for sleep. After 
this had been repeated several times they were 
called upon to read proof. Suffice it to say that 
they at once discovered how far short they had 
fallen of their true and destined vocation. 

We would like to see the owners of the names 
we incorrectly published, but from afar, for we 
realize from personal experience that if there is 
on .• thing Americans are sensitive about, it is the 
spelling of their names. 

First on our list is the Ogonty Mosaic, which 
name, we infer, belongs to the unique cover of 
the Ogontz Mosaic, distinguished for its pro- 
nounced political views. 

If the very, very young man bearing the name 
of Rolden Lee Borden could read, he would raise 
his small fist in defiance when he perceived that 
we called him Bolden Lee Borden. We suffered 
a nineteenth-century delusion to seize us when we 
tried to gain time by ignoring the Mc in Miss 
McCord's name. We never fail to answer the 
query, "What's in a name?" with the words, 
" There's everything in a name," and when we in- 
sert an e in Bridgman, an a in Stedman, and 
make a Pick out of a Peck, we may expect to have 
the wrath of whole families upon us, and submit 
to all such consequences with a spirit of unvar- 
nished grit. It may not make any material differ- 
ence to any one whether Mr. or Mrs. Walsh was 
the donor of the Hawaiian "Dala," but it is only 
fair to allow Mrs. Walsh to carry off the glory of 
presenting it to Lasell, although Mr. Walsh un- 
doubtedly helped her do it. Lastly, the " Basileus 
Alexandras " coin had the misfortune of being 
represented to the public in an entirely new and 
unheard of role, for which we beg its pardon. 



If the editors of some of our exchanges who 
have lately ridiculed to such an extent the idea of 



young women's interschool contests would pause 
in their wild writing and reflect in what century 
they are living, we have no doubt that their only 
desire would be to slink away into some remote 
corner. When they were comfortably settled 
there they might have a laugh all to themselves 
over their cheap jokes on the subject, and quietly 
burn all they had written to prevent its coming 
into the hands of any one undisturbed by narrow- 
mindedness. 

We should Like to have a talk with the writer 
of an article on this subject published in one of 
the college papers last month. We should enjoy 
waking him up, for surely he has been asleep for 
the last fifteen years. The scope of women's 
advantages has widened since he retired from 
public life. Just because it is not the custom for 
young women to indulge in interschool contests, 
it does not signify that she could not do so if it 
was thought best. Sports have not been made so 
important a factor in our educational life as in 
that of our male friends, but, nevertheless, we 
enjoy them to a certain extent. We have tennis 
clubs, out of which we get plenty of fun and 
physical benefit. Our boating, backed by mus- 
cle acquired through diligent work in the gymna- 
sium, cannot be sneered at or remain unnoticed. 
And why not have a drill contest ? Military drill 
has been introduced into a number of our schools, 
and will be into many more We have a battalion 
here that will compare favorably with any. Con- 
sidering the subject from a literary point of view, 
there is no earthly reason why we could not have 
contests upon subjects as deep as any our college 
friend (?) may ever hope to take part in. Nor 
even then should we think that the last word had 
been uttered on the matter. We close here for 
want of space, but if any one has still a tendency 
to slur us upon this subject, we are perfectly will 
ing to continue later, and, if possible, correct, their 
mistaken views. 



Our hearts were filled with sympathy for our 
mate, Sadie Hollingsworth, when the sad news 
came of the death of her father, and she left us, 
to take her long, trying journey. Surely the 
thoughts of every one of us were with her during 
the two davs and two nights she was obliged to 
travel, as well as after she reached her grief- 



146 



Lasell Leaves. 



stricken home. We realize with sadness how 
little there is in our power to do for her, in her 
great sorrow. 

Mr. Hollingsworth was held in universal esteem 
at his home in Evansville, where he had resided 
the greater part of his life, and his sudden death, 
Thursday afternoon, April 26, cast a gloom over 
the entire community. 



JUNIATA BOAT CLUB. 

Saturday evening, April 14, was made memo- 
rable to at least ten of our number by the Juniata 
Boat Club initiation and banquet. 

The crowd gathered at the foot of the stairway 
leading to the studio, to witness anything start- 
ling that might occur, saw only five figures ap- 
parelled in the regulation initiating costume, with 
the addition of a few yards of yellow ribbon, but 
had they thought to look for the hearts of these 
prospective victims they would have been found 
very near their mouths, for they had been sum- 
moned to their doom, and felt that their hour had 
indeed come. At 7.30 the melancholy procession 
ascended the stairs with fear and trembling, and 
reached the top only to be seized with a new 
terror in human form, who blindfolded them and 
led them — But we may not say where, or give 
further particulars of the initiation : suffice it to 
say they were quite initiated, and came out of the 
fray with fewer broken bones than might have 
been expected. After the removal of some of the 
frescoing from the faces of the victims, the club 
repaired to the S. D. room — the supper-room, 
for the evening. 

The table was tastefully decorated with daisies 
and ferns, the Juniata banner in the centre, with 
an elaborate menu and a souvenir of the occasion 
at each plate. The banquet, as dainty as if Epi- 
curus himself had personally supervised its order- 
ing, was a satisfaction in every respect. With the 
lighter viands came the toasts and a word of wel- 
come to the new members from the captain, to 
which there was no need to call for a formal re- 
sponse, as all responded without hesitation, and 
the remainder of the evening was happily appor- 
tioned to the "flow of soul." 

A word must be said here in regard to the form- 
ing, etc., of this club. In 1882, five girls, noted 
for — ask us rather to tell what they were not noted 



for — well, these five noted girls, especially fond of 
boating, took it into their heads to form a club 
for that purpose. Happy inspiration ! A club 
was formed, a name bestowed upon it, a constitu- 
tion made, and a boat purchased ; so began the 
renowned Juniata Boat Club. 

The club has always held its own despite various 
oppositions from one source and another, and one 
seldom sees a better managed crew on the Charles 
(above Riverside). L. C. R. 

NOTHING. 

You are looking at the aquarium on the library 
table. There is a trigonometry before you, which 
you do not understand, and therefore, you di- 
vide your time between reckoning up the seconds 
until June, and covertly poking the goldfish, 
"just to see what they will do." 

" Write something." Turning your head, you en- 
counter the smiling visage of the editor-in-chief, 
who, having fired her bombshell, hastily retreats 
before your volley of expostulations can harm her 
armor of assurance. It suddenly occurs to you 
that snow in the middle of May exactly harmonizes 
with your feelings. The world has all at once be- 
come "cold, dark, and dreary." Every shadow of 
an idea having left your head, it seems that some- 
where you have heard of fish in connection with 
brains, whether the latter were obtained by con- 
duction through the eyes while gazing at them, or 
simply by their proximity, is unknown. It can be 
tried : so you assume a very impolite stare. The 
fish do not seem to appreciate the situation, and 
still preserve the same inane and non-committal 
expression. You rise in disgust. 

Of course a subject is the first step ; but you 
can think of nothing. It might be your last walk 
in the " beautiful village of Auburndale." It was 
spring, and ye maiden's fancy lightly turned to 
thoughts of holey overshoes and inconveniently 
inundated sidewalks. Auburndale being, as the 
catalogue informed you, a "quiet village of 
homes," encounters upon its streets are not fre- 
quent. On this occasion you were more than usu- 
ally fortunate in meeting six dogs, a few stray cats, 
an elderly gentleman, and two babies. After walk- 
ing past the hotel, in the delusive hope of seeing 
W. D. Howells, — rumor has it he was once there, 
— you returned to filtrates and precipitates. 



Las ell Leaves. 



H7 



There is nothing wildly exciting in that subject. 
Plainly it must be of the harrowing type. It 
might be called " A Pair of Socks ; or, The Wash- 
woman's Revenge," "The Seven Unwise Men of 
Chicago; or, The Anarchist's Uncle," or even "The 
Mystery of One Night's Faculty Meeting." Having 
a title, the plot, like the future President, is envel- 
oped in obscurity. You are plainly not the one to 
lead forth the " dark horse." 

Your last journey to Boston is the only resource. 
It was exciting because you went alone. Timidly 
getting into the train, you thought, as only half- 
seats were unoccupied, that you had better choose 
one with an elderly gentleman, which you did. He, 
thinking you had shown remarkably good taste, 
and desiring to show his appreciation, beamed 
upon you, and immediately entered upon a very 
one-sided, but, nevertheless, extensive conversa- 
tion. Being considerably frightened, you looked 
around for means of escape, and encountered the 
disapproving gaze of one whom you knew to be a 
celebrity. It seemed as though she ought to do 
something extraordinary, but she behaved as any 
ordinary mortal, much to your disappointment. 
You wondered if all great people are only unusual 
as regards appearances, in being so extremely 
ugly, and were then recalled to your senses by your 
old gentleman, who made the startling announce- 
ment, " The country is going to ruin, my dear." 

Meanwhile the Newtons had been passed. Being 
inquisitive, you wondered how many there were, 
and, counting up, discovered seven. Evidently 
the early settlers lacked in originality. It seems 
strange that they did not call Boston, Northeast 
Newton. Surely an entirely new name was 
unnecessary. 

You have wasted an hour and have not grasped 
an idea. The bell rings, a reminder of trigonometry 
and unlearned lessons. You wish that your tongue 
could utter some thoughts that don't come over 
you. Then, throwing down your books in disgust, 
you remark, " It 's no use, I shall have to tell her 
that 1 '11 write absolutely ' Nothing.' " H. R. G. 



LASELLIA ENTERTAINMENT. 
On the evening of April 26 the annual enter- 
tainment of the Lasellia Club took place. The 
following programme was rendered :-— 



Part I. 

PIANOFORTE QUARTET. Marche Hongroise . . Liszt 

MISSES THOMAS, GARDNER, GRAY, OLIVER. 
PRESIDENT'S ADDRESS. 

MISS WHITE. 

READING. Selection from " The Courtship of Miles Standish," 

Longfe/low 

MISS RICHARDS. 

SONG. Greyport Town Lohr 

MISS GIBBONS. 

RECITATION The Hat From the French 

MISS REED. 
PIANOFORTE. Transcription of Litthauisches Volkslied, 

Chopin-Beudel 
MISS GRAY. 



Part II. 

SONPS ^ a ' ^ as Vergissmeinnicht 
' />. Standchen 



Suppe 
Meyer Hehnund 



MISS WHIPPLE. 



RFADINC \ a ' First Chapter of " Great Expectations," Dickc 
• b. " Oh ! Monsieur" . . Edward Gardin 



kens 
el* 



MISS LANGLEY. 
VIOLIN SOLO. Fantaisie de Salon 

(I Lombardi.) 

MISS SKINNER. 
CHORUS. Waggon .... 



H. Vieitxteiups 



Molloy 



A large and appreciative audience assembled in 
the gymnasium at the hour named, and it is no 
exaggeration to say the club fully deserved all the 
praise bestowed upon them. The readings by 
Miss Langley and the singing of Miss Whipple, 
both former Lasellians, added very much to the 
enjoyment of the evening ; Miss Langley's imper- 
sonation of " Pip," in "Great Expectations," was 
especially pleasing, and won much well-merited 
applause. Miss Whipple has a finely cultivated 
voice, and charmed the audience by her rendition 
of two German songs. In response to an encore 
she sang " Marguerite'' with marked feeling. 

The other parts of the programme were well 
rendered, and deserve generous praise, but space 
forbids special mention. 

Great credit is due the committee for their 
efforts to secure an excellent and unusually taste- 
ful programme. Certainly the success of the even- 
ing shows that their energies were not expended 
in vain 

After the close of the entertainment an informal 
reception was held, thus giving the members of 
the club a chance to greet their friends, many of 
whom were present from Boston, Newton, Har- 
vard, Amherst, and the Institute of Technology. 



^Translated by Louise Imogen Guiney expressly for Miss Langley. 



148 



Lasell Leaves. 



THE JEWESS IN FICTION. 

ILLUSTRATED BY MIKAH AND REBECCA. 

To know Jewish history is to understand much 
that is pecu iar in the life of the individual Jew. 

Certain elements in his character date far back 
to the time when his ancestors cultivated wine and 
oil, fruit and flowers, on the sunny plains of Pal- 
estine and amidst the soft landscapes of Babylo- 
nia and Persia. Those were happy clays for the 
Jews, and the fulfilment of their divine destiny 
seemed not far away. They were not yet a hope- 
less, homeless people. But it was the lot of the 
Hebrew that " grief and glory should be mingled 
as the smoke and the flame." A change of worldly 
circumstances came, and by this change other 
elements were introduced into the Jewish charac- 
ter. In rapid succession the Pharaohs, the north- 
ern barbarians, and the Crusaders drove them 
forth on their long wandering. Not for centuries 
were they again to know a happy home-life. When 
free from persecutions, they lived apart from other 
men, unknown and friendless. Yet in their sor- 
rows they gave the world its most splendid 
example of dignity and patience. Kunz says, " If 
there are ranks in suffering, Israel takes prece- 
dence of all the nations ; if the duration of sorrows 
and the patience with which they are borne ennoble, 
the Jews are among the aristocracy of every land ; 
if a literature is called rich in the possession of a 
few classic tragedies, what shall we say to a 
national tragedy lasting for fifteen hundred years, 
in which the poets and the actors were also the 
heroes ? " 

Through all this time the memory of their 
former dignity and the belief in their future glory 
seem never to have forsaken the Jews. Nor 
have they ever lost interest in education and liter- 
ature. But when they left their homes in Pales- 
tine they left with them all love of agriculture. 
From that time on they have devoted themselves 
almost wholly to money-getting. With what suc- 
cess materially, and with what failure morally, 
Shakespeare has shown in Shylock, — a Jew whose 
Jewship the world has never questioned. 

But it has been left practically to Scott and to 
George Eliot to give us the Jewish woman. Liv- 
ing at a time when the Jews are still .persecuted, 
and when, through their avarice and subserviency, 
they have become their own enemies, Rebecca is 



truly what her father calls her, " A blessing and 
a crown, and a song of rejoicing unto me and 
to my house, and unto the people of my 
fathers." She believes firmly in the destiny 
of her people, though none realize better 
than she how far they are now removed from 
that destiny. The Jewish religious bond, 
"Our God and the God of our fathers," seems 
to Rebecca a strong and precious tie between all 
that is best in herself and all that is greatest in 
the history of her nation. It is this unity with 
what has been that gives her courage for the 
prestnt and hope for the future. 

Our other Jewess, Mirah, is both like and un- 
like Rebecca; just as one summer evening may 
resemble another, and yet the one leave a pleas- 
ant feeling of more summer days to come, while 
the other forebodes storms and early autumn 
winds. Rebecca is a Jewess of the twelfth 
century; Mirah is a Jewess of the nineteenth 
century. But the difference between them is not 
alone that of seven hundred years. Rebecca 
lives always among Jewess people, yet her reli- 
gion is an abstraction ; something to work very 
hard for, to die for if necessary. Mirah lives, 
for the most part, among Christian people, yet 
her religion is personal ; he who assails it hurts 
her just as much as if he had attacked herself or 
the dearest friend she has. Rebecca says that 
she would shed her own blood drop by drop if 
she could redeem the captivity of Judah ; and we 
believe that she would. Mirah never speaks of 
dying for her people, but she mourns because she 
does not live better for their sake. Yet, she is 
no "ten-minute emotionalist." 

Exclusiveness has always been a good feature 
of the Jewish character, and distrust of others is 
the outgrowth of their peculiar history. In Jew- 
ish women this distrust naturally takes the form 
of self-repression. Rebecca, at times, is almost 
morbid, yet it is the effect of her being constantly 
thrown back upon herself for companionship and 
encouragement. Having no one to compare her- 
self with, she does not know her own value. She 
feels that there is something out of harmony be- 
tween herself and her world ; but with all the 
generosity of a great heart, she does not once 
think that it is the discord of her own nobility 
and its servility. Mirah's self-repression does 



Lasell Leaves. 



149 






not come from self-analysis, nor does it have 
even one tinge of melancholy. In the early part 
of her life she distrusts the people that she 
knows ; but they are worthy any one's distrust. 
The world about her is not her world. She lives 
in it, yet alone, with only her own sweet ihoughts 
and fancies for companions. Her nature is that 
of a delicate plant, that cannot mature and bios" 
som in an uncongenial soil, but, given the proper 
surroundings, the blossoms are of rare beauty. 
There is naturally less of Jewish exclusiveness in 
Mirah, than of Christian democracy. She says, 
" I am glad to learn that Deronda is of high 
rank, because I have always disliked men of high 
rank before." 

The Jews are a solemn people. In all their lit- 
erature there is no trace of humor; nor is the 
Jewish face suggestive of even the shadow of a 
smile. Rebecca is . too good a Jewess even to 
laugh. Mirah does occasionally, but it may be 
termed a Christianized laugh. Rebecca thinks of 
the solemnity of the past, the present, and the 
future ; Mirah thinks of it when circumstances 
compel, and no oftener. She is easily pleased, 
and as easily saddened. That she knows this up- 
and-down tendency is not the least of her self- 
knowledge. 

She says to her brother, " Ezra, you are a 
spring in the drought, and I am an acorn cup : 
the waters of heaven fill me, but the least little 
shake leaves me empty." 

One feels that Rebecca would still be stately 
and solemn, even away from all Jewish surround- 
ings. But in the midst of them she is so stately 
and so solemn that she must put the Jewish Rab- 
bis themselves to shame. On the other hand, 
Mirah's patient sadness changes to quiet happi- 
ness as the circle of her life widens out more and 
more from its Jewish centre. 

But In the study of the Jewess there is danger 
of losing sight of the woman. Her attributes are 
in all, through all, and above all. It needs a fine 
nature to appreciate the fineness of other natures 
— a nature that not only will not jar upon others, 
but will keep others from jarring upon themselves. 
Because Mirah and Rebecca are Jewesses they 
are more familiar with sorrow than most women 
are. They bear their sorrows well, and this helps 
them to a better insight into the highest aims of 



others, helps them to see the real persons in 
what they hope for, work for, often in their very 
failures. Others see in Ezra only a sepulchral 
Jew. With the single exception of Deronda, 
Mirah is the only one who feels the real heroism 
of his devotion to the cause of his down-trodden 
people. 

He cannot be a lovable person, nor one who 
is interesting to live with. But the beauty of his 
life-work so ennobles the man to Mirah that she 
forgets that he is her brother, and thinks of him as 
of a "prophet come from God." It is said that 
Mirah's presence is like " freshly opened daisies 
and clear bird-notes after the rain." Daisies grow 
everywhere, bird-notes are heard everywhere ; yet 
they belong only to the nobility of the wor'd, for 
these are the ones who see them best, hear them 
best. Rebecca has little chance to show her 
appreciation of others. With her this expression 
is mostly abstract. She shows what she would 
do, what a friend she would be, if she could 

Given the opportunity, Rebecca would not be 
wanting. In her imagination, the women that 
she does not know are always thinking her best 
thoughts, and are constantly doing her rarest 
deeds ; while the men that she does not know are 
never for a moment otherwise than manly and 
chivalrous. The men that she does know, her 
father and the Templar, she almost saves from 
themselves at times, by force of her belief, that 
they can not, will not carry out the wrong which 
they have begun. This very feeling of kinship 
with the true and the noble makes Mirah and 
Rebecca long intensely for recognition. It is not 
so much a desire to be received on terms of in- 
timacy as it is a yearning to be free from the 
sickening sense of being forever misjudged. When 
Ivanhoe is wounded, and Rebecca is caring for 
him, she is cruelly hurt by his cold, constrained 
manner, after he learns from her own lips that she 
is a Jewess. Nothing could be prouder, and at 
the same time, more womanly, than her answer, 
when he offers to pay her : " I will but pray of 
thee to believe henceforward, that a few may do 
good service to a Christian without desiring other 
guerdon than the blessing of the Great Father 
who made both Jew and Gentile." But recog- 
nition never comes to Rebecca, and this lonely, 
unknown feeling strengthens with her life, until 



i5o 



Las ell Leaves. 



she pours out her whole heart in that last talk 
with Rowena : — 

" You have power, rank, command, influence; 
we have — money." 

Contrasted with Rebecca's stormy anguish, 
Mirah's quiet renunciation suggests more than 
ever the difference between the falcon and the 
dove. Even when given the same cause for sor- 
row, their sorrow is by no means the same. 
Rebecca must fight hers out to the bitter end, 
while Mirah lives her out, day by day. She is so 
used to playing parts, that, by feigning content- 
ment, she deceives people, and they take for real 
happiness that which is only a fine part finely 
played. In her after life they are surprised to hear 
of " the evident thirst of soul with which she re- 
ceives the tribute of equality — the latent protest 
against the treatment she has all her life been sub- 
ject to." 

Mirah and Rebecca are always womanly, and in 
the main issues of their life they are positively 
heroic. Scott is charged with a tendency to make 
his characters talk from the outside ; but only 
once does he make Rebecca do any of this outside 
talking. This is when the Black Knight and his 
followers are besieging Torquilstone Castle, 
Rebecca and Ivanhoe are prisoners in the castle. 
Ivanhoe is wounded, and cannot watch the assault, 
yet with all a warrior's eagerness he longs to know 
its progress. Seeing his anxiety, Rebecca offers to 
stand at the lattice and describe to him what passes 
without. 

"You must not; you shall not!" exclaimed 
Ivanhoe. " Each lattice, each aperture, will soon 
be a mark for the archers ; some random shaft — " 

"It shall be welcome!" murmurs Rebecca. 
That is Rebecca's voice says these words ; but it 
is Scott, who, for the moment, has control of that 
voice. The sentiment is but a purple patch of 
affected heroism, and has no connection with the 
real heroism, which is a vital part of Rebecca's 
character. Neither Isaac of York nor Mr. Lapi- 
doth is a man whom a girl could be proud to call 
father. Yet, although Rebecca and Mirah each has 
a perfect knowledge of her father's petty, miserable 
characler, she struggles hard to keep that knowl- 
edge from the world. And in this effort Mirah is 
grander, more heroic, than Rebecca. Neither of 
them has any self-motive, yet their individuality is [ 



apparent. Mirah is at no time more thoroughly 
a woman than she is while planning to keep her 
father from everything that can make him less of 
a man in his own eyes. 

She has a fine sense of the possible humiliation 
and shame that he might feel in the presence of a 
superior person, like her brother, and she would 
rather die than subject him to that experience. 
Rebecca is at no time more thoroughly a Jewess 
than she is when secretly returning to Ivanhoe's 
servant the money that her father's avarice has 
just taken from him. She does this because her 
father is a Jew, and for the honor of the Jewish 
race ; not because her father is a man, and for 
the honor of manhood. 

When services that are naturally rendered 
gladly and lovingly become a disagreeable duty, 
there can be no more irksome bondage, nor no 
duty for the faithful performance of which greater 
heroism is required. Mirah does not, can not 
love her father, because she does not, can not 
respect him. Yet she thinks of him when he does 
not think of himself, works for him when he will 
not work for himself, and saves him from many 
evils in spite of himself. Rebecca, too, is devoted 
to her father ; not for his own sake, but for her 
people's sake. She would have others believe 
that his avarice and subserviency are not personal 
faults, least of all, Jewish faults, but that they 
are the natural outgrowth of Christians' cruelty 
and persecution. 

But, while wretched, degraded fathers are found 
among Christians as well as Jews, there are some 
trials that are peculiar to Mirah and Rebecca as 
Jewesses, — trials which bring out their greatest, 
best heroism. When Mirah is very young, the 
truth is forced upon her that all the sorrow in her 
life is caused by the fact that she is a Jewess, and 
that always to the end people will think slight- 
ingly and unjustly of her. This is a trouble from 
which there can be no escape. She has to live 
and love people into appreciating and liking her. 
With her there is so little outward expression 
that many mistake her firmness for lack of feeling, 
and hold the same opinion of her that Gwendolen 
once expressed : " I have no sympathy with 
women who are always doing right. I don't 
believe in their great sufferings." But one 
who understood Mirah better than any other can, 



Lasell Leaves. 



iSi 



says : ''In the Psyche mould of Mirah's frame, rests 
a fervid quality of emotion, sometimes rashly sup- 
posed to require the bulk of a Cleopatra." With- 
out this depth of feeling Mirah could never under- 
stand so well the great gulf between her life and 
that of other girls. But she will not yield to cir- 
cumstances. She conquers those that can be con- 
quered, and resolutely bears those that she cannot 
better. Rebecca's heroism is essentially different, 
ft is no more to be compared with what is gener- 
ally termed heroism than Mirah is to be com- 
pared with Gwendolen. It has an entirely distinct 
form. If one attempt to analyze it or to separate 
it from Rebecca, she ceases to be ; for heroism is 
the very foundation of her character. She is 
heroic in her deeds to the Jews ; heroic when a 
prisoner in Torquilstone Castle ; heroic when say- 
ing " Mizpah" to her worst enemy, the Templar; 
and in the face of death her courage is of no less 
high a type than that of Marie Stuart or Joan 
D'Arc. Without doubt Rebecca is the Jewess 
idealized, and Mirah the Jewess Christianized. 
But this idealization and this Christianization 
make them all the more interesting and profitable 
as studies. Throughout they are rigorously true 
to their own laws of being. Rebecca has all the 
bloom and fragrance and passionful soul of a 
Southern exotic, while Mirah has the pure sim- 
plicity of a Northern snowdrop. X. 



c/ ~ 

The two charming flower paintings which have 
just arrived from Portland, Me., are the work of 
Mrs Daniel Atwood of that city. As Miss Jennie 
West, she was for several years the beloved and 
valued teacher of the art department, and is well 
remembered by some who yet belong to the 
school. 

The asters are a gift from her to the art gallery, 
— a very generous offering, for which all are very 
grateful. It is the first gift of the kind, but we 
trust before long many others will remember the 
art needs of the school as kindly. 

The large genre painting of the young girl set- 
ting the clock back, while her parents are nodding 
to sleep, in order that her lover may stay later, is 
by Mr. John Dunsmore, of London. Mr. D. is a 
brother of Alice, who graduated at Lasell some 
years ago. 



The party for Europe this summer will be ex- 
ceedingly fortunate in the addition of Mrs. Mary 
B. Willard to their number. She is to have a 
school for American girls in Berlin next winter 
and has consented to join our party for the summer 
tour. Mrs. Willard was formerly widely known 
as the editor of the Union Signal, and her list of 
friends in the temperance work is very large. We 
can accommodate five more persons in the party, 
and our advice to those who wish to go is to engage 
at once, and secure the best accommodations. 
Address, Wm. T. Shepherd, Auburndale, Mass. 

Girls, send in your names right away if you want 
to go; this is a rare chance. C. C. B. 



SCIENTIFIC NOTES. 

The French authorities are attempting to make 
use of carrier-pigeons for conveying information 
from war-ships at sea to certain slalions on land, 
and with this object in view have fitted up on the 
St. Louis a dove-cot painted the most gorgeous 
colors in order to permit the birds to recognize 
their homes from a great distance. 

The plan of establishing a zoological garden in 
Boston, which has been pending for twenty-one 
years, stems to lead at last to practical results. 
The council of the Boston Society of Natural His- 
tory has taken the matter in hand, and has re- 
ceived offers of two separate sites for this garden. 
The society proposes to make the enterprise thor- 
oughly educational In view of the climate of 
New England, no attempt will be made to make 
the garden of so general a nature as those of 
Europe. It will be rather an effort to show 
specimens of American animals, especially those 
of New England. 

The chief officer of the United States Signal 
Service at New York, in explaining why there 
wer*; so manyshowt-rs in April, says: '• When the 
spring opens there is a great amount of moisture 
in the ground. The warm temperature draws it 
out and fills the atmosphere with m isture. If 
the temperature kept warm all the time this 
moisture would pass away ; but while floating 
around it is caught by the colder waves, con- 
densed, and sent back to earth in the form of rain. 
The changes in the temperature make this result 
come often." Whence the many April showers. 



152 



Lasell Leaves. 



SPRING. 

[This poem was sent to us by a little friend of ours, aged 
nine years.] 

Winter, so old and white, 

lias slipped his anchor during the night, 

And to other ports is bound to go, 

And take with him his glittering snow ; 

And in his place the little Spring, 

Who makes the woodlands once more ring 

With the joyous voice of the bird, 

And once more the flowers show their head 

From the earth, their wintry bed, 

And once more the little rill, 

Which Winter has made so still, 

Makes his voice be heard. 

J. H. Barnard. 



ART NOTES. 

The Louvre Museum has been enriched with a 
new room devoted to portraits of celebrated arti ts 
of all epochs painted, as far as possible, by them- 
selves. The idea is taken from the celebrated 
gallery in Uffizi, at Florence, with this difference, 
that the French contains not only portraits of 
painters but also busts and medallions of sculp- 
tors. 

The monument to Peter Cooper, to be erected 
at New York, will be executed by Mr. Augustus 
St. Gaudens, and is to take the form of a bronze 
statue of colossal size, showing the subject seated. 
The cost of the statue and the granite pedestal 
will be over $30,000. The money for the monu- 
ment has already been collected. The site has 
not yet been chosen. Mr. St. Gaudens is allowed 
three years in which to complete the work. This 
sculptor laid the foundation of his art education 
at the Cooper Institute. 

A copy of the medallion portrait of Louisa M. 
Alcott, by Walton Ricketson, has been presented 
to the Lancaster, Mass., High School, by the 
graduating class of that institution. The copy is 
a duplicate of the original in possession of the 
Alcott family. 



POLITICAL NOTES. 

Chairman Jones states that the report that 
Mr. Blaine has consented to an aggressive cam- 
paign for the Presidential nomination is false, 
and Washington friends of Mr. Blaine deny all 
knowledge of any such intention. 



Ex-Governor Foster says that Senator Sher- 
man is gaining in strength for the Presidential 
nomination. 

The President has sent to the Senate the nomi- 
nation of Melville W. Fuller, of Chicago, for 
Chief Justice of the United States Supreme Court. 

The political sensation of the week, in England, 
was a speech of Lord Randolph Churchill, made 
during the debate on the County Government Bill, 
and which was a vigorous attack on the ministry for 
their refusal to extend the provisions of that 
act to Ireland. 

Queen Victoria has returned to England from 
Berlin ; on the whole, her reception by the German 
people was respectful, but not enthusiastic. 

Mr. Gladstone is reported to have conferred 
with Painellites over an Irish local government 
scheme. 



MAJOR AND MINOR. 

Campanini, the tenor, is not superstitious, 
otherwise he would not have selected a Friday 
evening and the 13th of the month for the first 
performance of "Otello." 

The many Boston friends of that dainty little 
creature, Jeanne Douste, who made so many 
friends for herself and her pretty, lady-like elder 
sister when here last year, may like to know that 
she has been playing with the greatest success 
recently, under the royal patronage of the King of 
the Belgians, and also the Comtesse de Flandre. 

It is asserted by some that the individuality of 
a great pianist's style can be detected by the 
manner in which he grasps the hand of another 
in friendly greeting. Rubinstein's hand, there- 
fore, has been described as resembling " a heated 
stone hand, and quiet and warm " ; while that of 
Liszt is referred to as " a wondrous structure, like 
a many-limbed, warm-blooded reptile, that eluded 
the grasp and slipped through the fingers un- 
awares." 

Little Otto Hegner, the new musical marvel, 
of whom the critics are unanimous in their praises, 
will probably make a tour of the United States 
next season. Exit Hofmann — enter Hegner. 

Sig. August Rotoli has resigned the coi.ductor- 
ship of the Palestrina Society-. 



Lasell Leaves. 



l S3 



EXCHANGES. 
We have with us this month a new exchange, 
containing much good literary work between its 
artistic covers. The Fordham Monthly will al- 
ways be welcome. 

Of the several popular college exchanges at 
Lasell, few are more so than the Bates Student. 
The Literary Columns and the Poet's Corner are 
well filled, and the Literary Notes in the April 
number are very good. 

Cornell proposes to issue a monthly magazine, 
beginning on the 15th of April. It will be called 
the Cornell Magazine, and the editorial board is to 
be composed of the students and members of the 
Faculty. Edw. Everett Hale, Jr., will be editor-in- 
chief. 

The Pine Knot, of Southern Pines, N. C , 
copies from the Leaves a part of our letter from 
an old Lasell girl, — Mary E Coe. 

Yale theological students to the number of 
fifty are attempting to commit the entire Bible to 
memory. 

Twenty thousand dollars has been subscribed 
for the Vassar College gymnasium, which will be 
built in the spring. 

The fear of " exchanging stereotyped common- 
places " keeps us from saying all that we might 
like to say of the merits of the Bowdoin Orient. 
But we desist, hoping that so good an exchange 
won't go on forever without an exchange column. 

By the will of G. W. Hubbard, of Hatfield, 
Mass., Smith College will receive $150,000. 



LOCALS. 
Lasell was honored on May 25 by a visit from 
Laura Bridgman. Deprived of much that makes 
life pleasant, on account of the loss of three 
senses, she yet seemed as happy as any of us. 
Through her interpreter she talked with us of her 
favorite reading, of her friends, and of other 
topics of interest. She expressed a desire to visit 
the studio, gymnasium, and some of the girls' 
rooms. It seemed a strange request, and yet it is 
our opinion that at this date she can tell more of 
the details about these places than many of our 
visitors. Her criticisms upon our school and its 
customs were favorable, except in the case of the 



drill. She enjoyed that, but disapproved it, 
because the '• young ladies were so well-behaved 
they needed no extra training." Her visit was a 
pleasure to her and an inspiration to us. 

In the list of officers given in the April Leaves, 
the name of Bertha Gray, sergeant-major, was 
omitted. Added to that list are, E. Josie Wallace, 
second sergeant of Company A, and Frances 
Thomas, second sergeant of Company B. 

April 19 we again had the pleasure of hearing 
Judge Park. Appropriate to the day, he spoke to 
us concerning the battles of Concord and Lexing- 
ton. We are sure that all who heard his earnest 
words will date from that hour a greater love of 
country, and a stronger desire to become worthy 
citizens. 

Many of the girls went into the last of the 
Symphony Concerts, April 28, and spent a 
delightful evening-. 



What do you think of a teacher who spends a 
good deal of time — at least one minute — trying 
to imp; ess upon the minds of her unsophisticated 
pupils that punning is a habit not to be cultivated, 
then deliberately makes a pun herself? We will 
all follow her good example. 

Ok all sad words, in the sweet by and by, 
The saddest will surely be, " You see why." 

What a thing it must be when by the touch one 
can tell a color ! Most of the Lasell girls can 
tell when they feel blue. 

A number of the girls took tickets for the read- 
ings by Mr. Riddle at Newtonville. They proved 
very enjoyable. 

The money from the auctions of April 10 and 
12 amounted to about one hundred dollars. .All 
was' sent to Dr. Pierce. 

Wanted : Someone to explain the meaning of 
all the "jingling" heard in the halls. 

The members of the class of '88 presented the 
library with the " Englishmen of Letters, ' bound 
in thirty-eight volumes. 

The girls spent a jolly evening in the gymna- 
sium, May 5. After a short programme, about a 
dozen of the girls took part in the May Pole 
dance, which was enjoyed by all. We made 
"100b for de queed ob de Bay," but as we did 



*54 



Lasell Leaves. 



not see her, think she must have forgotten her im- 
portant position. 

Although Boston is the Hub-bub of the Uni- 
verse, it is prouder than ever since it has been 
said that Moses was found in Jordan Marsh(e)s. 

" Never too late to mend." Why is it, then, 
we are obliged to have our lights out promptly at 
nine o'clock ? 

The election of officers of the Lasellia Club took 
place Thursday evening, April 19. The result 
stands : President, Fannie Reed ; Vice-President, 
Louise Richards ; Secretary, Maud Oliver; Treas- 
urer, Annie Gage ; Critic, Grace Skinner; Guard, 
Elizabeth Eddy; Assistant Guard, Anne Bushnell; 
Executive Committee, Mayme Binford, Lucy Dud- 
ley, and Mamie Beach. 

The Atalanta Tennis Club had the first meeting 
of the year May 4. It was decided that courts 
should be marked. When ? Some time. Where ? 
On grass. By whom ? " A colored gentleman 
of Newtonville." 

The officers of the S. D. Society are as follows : 
President, Leah Couts ; Vice-President, Daisy 
Lloyd; Secretary, Luella Richards; Treasurer, 
Marie Moger ; Critic, Helen Gilbert ; Usher, 
Maude Van Horn. 



PERSONALS. 

Mrs. Gertrude Carey Campbell's home is 
changed to 4020 Finney Avenue, St. Louis, Mo. 

Married. — At Portland, Oregon, April n, Miss 
Nellie Brooks and Mr. Herbert Bradley. "At 
home," 390 C Street, Portland, Oregon. 

Lutie Price, of Denver, Col., still has a warm 
place in the hearts of her Lasell friends. We 
should be glad to hear her lovely voice in that 
" Grand Musicale at Denver." 

Miss Laura Munger writes from her home at 
Xenia, Ohio, of continuing her studies in va- 
rious ways. Her instructor in French, Prof. 
Paillet, now seventy-two years of age, was in ex- 
ile from France with Victor Hugo, and is said to 
have furnished traits for the character of Jean 
Valjean in " Les Miserables." Miss Munger rec- 
ommends highly Mr. W. W. White's method of 
memory training, which she has acquired. 



Miss Dora M. Mayo's address is College 
Hill, Mass., the present residence of her 
parents. 

Mrs. Wm F. Etherington is congratulated on 
the arrival of the little "Elizabeth Etherington," 
April 16, 1888. 

Miss Nellie E. Alling's address is 1237 S. 
Fourteenth Street, Denver, Col., the home 
having been changed from Canon City to that 
place. 

We were glad to hear recently of Lizzie 
Whipple, of Wellesley Hills, as well and happy, 
and busy as ever. 

Married. — April 25, at Hawkinsville, Ga., 
Miss Ada Anderson and Mr. Robert D. Brown. 
" At home," Hawkinsville, Ga. 

Mrs. Pennell spent a number of days in May 
with her daughter Lucy. 

Miss Hance was detained by illness in Roches- 
ter, N. Y., but is now comfortably well at her 
home, 720 Sixth Avenue, S., Minneapolis, Minn. 

We are not surprised to hear of Minnie Routt 
as a " bright particular star " in her social 
sphere. She will keep a level head withal, too. 

The address of Mrs. Anna Lovering Barrett, 
'81, is 1841 L Street, N. W., Washington, D. C. 
She hopes to see any of the Lasell girls who go 
there. 

Miss Tash is with her aunt, at 31 Gray Street, 
Boston. We hear that she is " gaining every 
day." 

Mrs. Lincoln left Wollaston, May 7, for an 
extended tour, partly for pleasure and partly to 
see cooking schools in Buffalo, Toledo, Chicago, 
Milwaukee, Minneapolis, Pittsburg, and Philadel- 
phia, wherein Lasell girls are particularly intei- 
ested. 

Virginia R. Prickett, '85, expects to be mar- 
ried in September to Mr. Burrowes,of New York. 
Now, Georgia, who would think that of you? 

Dr A. P. Peabody, of Cambridge, will preach 
the baccalaureate sermon on Sunday, June 10. 
Miss Sarah F. Smiley, of Saratoga, N. V., will 
address the graduating class on Wednesday, 
June 13. 

Mrs. Susie Alling is still living in Rome, Italy. 



Lasell Leaves. 



155 



Mary Hanmer, aunt of our Hattie Hanmer, of 
Burnside, Conn., died April 18. This is the aunt 
who was with the Lasell European party. 

A genial companion, an interested traveller, an 
eager learner of new things, she was a welcome and 
valuable addition to our number. Our remem- 
brance of her is only pleasant. We regret also 
to state that Hattie's mother has not been well. 

Mrs. Georgia Hatch Jones sends for the 
album of "Lasell grandchildren" a lovely pic- 
ture of " Wellington, two years April 4, 1888." 
Thanks, Georgie ! Now for one of the good old 
letters. 

The largest, loveliest Mayflowers which we 
have ever seen adorn the principal's desk in 
Chapel, — the happy remembrance of Grace Van 
Buskiik. '• Sweet welcome to thee, dainty, win- 
some flower ! " A kind thought on the part of 
one who is kindly thought of in her old school 

home. 

-**» 

Behavior is a mirror in which every one dis- 
plays his own image. — Goethe 



Said a Senior to Miss Blank. " Have you 
ever had mineralogy ? " 

Miss Blank {who never did see anything funny 
in Mrs. Partington 's sayings) . " I have had it in 
my head, but never in my face." 



AMATEUR PHOTOGRAPHIC OUTFITS, 

All Sizes and Styles at Lowest Prices. 

BENJ. FRENCH & CO. 

319 Washington Street - - Boston, Mass. 



H. H. HUNT, 

CARPENTER AND BUILDER, 

WEST NEWTON, MASS. 
Shop near E. E. Crossing, P. Box 235. 

WADri 0. pn CARRIAGE AND WAGON BUILDERS, 

WIlllD a UU., Cor. Elm and Washington Sts., near City Hall, 

"WEST WEWTON. 

Fine Carriages and Wagons of any description built to order and War- 
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branches promptly and thoroughly executed at fair prices. The Repair- 
ng of Fine Carriages a Specialty. 

Carriages Sent for and Returned Free of Charge. 



EMERSON 



FINEST TONE, 

BEST WORK AND 

MATERIAL 



Established in 1849. 




Nearly 

50,000 Made 

AND IN USE. 

Every Instrument Fully Warranted. 



PRICES MODERATE AND TERMS 
REASONABLE. 



PIANOS. 



ILLUSTRATED CATALOGUES FREE. 



EMERSON PIANO CO. - BOSTON, MASS. 




JUSEPH {*I LLQTT'S 
Id luL PENS* 1 

THE FAVORITE NUMBERS, 303,404, 332,351, 170, 

AND HIS OTEJER STYLES 

SOLD by ALL DEALERS throughout the WORLD. 




i 5 6 



Lasell Leaves. 




BLANKET WRAPS FOR BABY. 

Blanket wraps for the nursery, the bath, the 
sick room, or steamer travelling, for men, women, 
children, and the baby, at Noyes Bros'. 

Morning and evening wedding outfits in shirts, 
collars, cravats, and gloves a specialty, at Noyes 
Bros'. 

English mackintosh coats for ladies and gentle- 
men, at Noyes Bros'. 

English silk umbrellas in gold, silver, and natura 
wood handles, ladies' and men's, $2.75 to $35.00, 
very rare and choice designs, at Noyes Bros'. 



Lawn Tennis and Yachting Suits. 

Flannel, 

Madras, 

English, 

Cheviots 

and Silk 

Shirtings 



For Travelling Shirts, 

" Railway Cars, 

" Steamer Wear, 

" House Night Wraps, 

" Bath or Sick Room, 

" Hunting and Fishing, 

" Lawn Tennis, 

" Office and House Coats. 



NOYES BROS. 

Lawn Tennis shirts, coats, trousers, belts, 
sashes, and caps, ladies' blouse waists, from 
best English and French Flannels and Oxfords, 
at Noyes Bros'. 

Boys' Waists in Flannels, Cheviots, and Ox- 
fords; Flannel Office Coats, English Hold-alls, 
Steamer Wraps and Rugs, at Noyes Bros'. 

English Travelling Rugs for railway and 
steamer use, $3.73 to $50.00, at Noyes Bros'. 

English Dressing-gowns, Study Coats, House 
Coats and Office Coats, and Long Wraps, $5.00 
to $45.00, in stock or to measure, at Noyes 
Bros'. 

NOYES BROS., 

Hosiers, Glovers, and Shirt Makers, 

WASHINGTON AND SUMMER STREETS, 

BOSTON, U. S. A. 



DRESS SHIRTS 

For Weddings and Receptions. 

The present fashion of Shirts, with Linen 
Cords, Embroidered Figures, and Spot Bosoms, 
may be had of Noyes Bros., most thoroughly 
and elegantly made. 

We have a Special Department for Re- 
pairing Shirts, Hosiery, Underwear, Gloves, 
or any article belonging to Gentlemen; can be 
laundered and repaired at short notice, at Noyes 
Bros'. 

There are 81 offices in Boston who advertise 
Troy Laundry. Messrs. Noyes Bros, are 
the only house in Boston that actually sends 
goods there. 

We send the work every day, and return in 
five days, and give new goods for any damaged. 

Special Laundry Department for 

Dress Shirts, Vests, and Wash-Scarfs. Re- 
laundered equal to new goods, at Noyes Bros'. 

Family Laundry Work called for and 
returned with no extra charge. 



NOYES BROS., 

Hosiers, Glovers, and Shirt Makers, 

WASHINGTON AND SUMMER STREETS, 
BOSTON, MASS., U. S. A. 



ESTABLISHED 1817. 



JOHN H. PRAY, SONS & CO. 

Importers. Jolliers, Retailers anl Manufacturers' Agents. 

Carpetings, Mattings, Oil Cloth, 

ORIENTAL RUGS, 

CARPETS AND UPHOLSTERY. 



558 and 560 Washington St., 

30 to 34 Harrison Ave. Extension, 



BOSTON. 



113 Worth Street 



NKW YORK. 



Lasell Leaves. 



157 



A. STOWELL & CO. 

24 Winter Street, Boston. 



^oirie of our Specialties : 

Bohemian Garnet Jewelry. 
Amber Beads and Ornaments. 
Tortoise-Shell Hair Pins. 
Choice Leather Goods. 
Oxidized Silver Jewelry. 
Fans for all occasions. 
Pearl Opera Glasses. 
Fine Gold Jewelry. 

Wedding Presents in Clocks, Vases and 
Bronzes. 

LATEST NOVELTIES IN ALL DEPARTMENTS. 
Lowest Prices. 



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YOUNG LADIES' 

BOOTS, SHOES AND SUPPERS, 

Stylish and Durable at Moderate Prices. 

GYMNASIUM SHOES A SPFXIALTY. 

Tliayer, McNeil & Hodgkins, 

47 TEMPLE PL. - - BOSTON. 

The thoroughness of construction, elasticity of 
action, depth, sonority, and singing quality of tone, 
evenness in all the registers, and unrivalled artistic 
designs in cases have made the 

HALLET & DAVIS HAND 

the favored instrument in such celebrated institutions 
as the Lasell Seminary, Leipsic Conservatory of 
Music, Chicago Musical College, New England 
Conservatory of Music, and the musical public 
generally. 

. WAREROOMS, 

179 Tf^EjVIONT STREET, 

Roston, Mass. 



C. B. Wojds. 



H. J. Wood. 



C. B. WOODS & CO. 



MANUFACTURERS OF 



Fine Furniture, 

Upholstery, Draperies, Wood Mantels 
and Interior Finish. 

OFFICE AND WAREROOMS, 

105 and 107 Chauncy Street, Boston. 



JOHN J. O'BRIEN, 

Picture Frames 

01 Every Description, Wholesale and Retail. 

OLD IF 1 IR, ^ IMI IE S IRIEa-XIILT. 

69 CORNHILL, BOS TON. 

ESTABLISHED IS^O. 

Isaac Locke & Company, 

Produce Commission Merchants, 

FOREIGN and DOMESTIC FRUITS 

97, 99 and 101 Faneiill Hall Market, and Basemeni 18 Soulli Side, 

BOSTON - - - MASS. 

J9®~ Telephone Connection 



158 



Las ell Leaves. 



-x-WEBER ; S-x- 



25, 27 TEMPLE PLACE - 



BOSTON, 



J^NTD 33 WEST STREET, 

Ladies' and Gents' Restaurant, 

Oysters and Salads a Specialty. 

OPEN AFTER THEATRES. 

Caterer for Wedding Breakfasts, Lunches, Dinner and Evening Parties 

and Receptions. Also, Club Suppers at Short Notice 

and Reasonable Prices. 

S. W. BAILEY, 

— DEALER IN — 

WATCHES, JEWELRY, SILVERWARE, ETC. 

353 Washington Street, Boston. 

Jewelry Neatly Repaired. Also, Monograms on Coin Pieces. Personal 
Attention given to Repairing Fine Watches. 

ESTABLISHED 1847- 



AARON R. GAY & CO. 

No. 122 State Street, Boston, 

STATIONERS 



AND 



BLANK BOO K MANU FACTURERS, 

First-Class Account Books of any desired 
pattern made to order. 

S. S. GAY. EDWIN W. GAY. 

JUST WHAT HAS BEEN WANTED. 

A LADIES' LUNCH ROOM 



HAS BEEN OPENED AT 



23 AVON STREET, BOSTON. 

A quiet, neat place, where a nice Lunch can be had at a very reason- 
able price. All the ladies say, " Isn't it nice ? " 

T. D. COOK, Caterer. 

ALSO, 

"Wedding and other Parties 

Served with the Choicest Viands, and by Competent Waiters. 

SUPERIOR ICE-CREAM 

DELIVERED AT REASONABLE PRICES. 



♦J- 



THE 



--S- 



YOUTH'S COMPANION, 

A WEEKLY PAPER FOR 

YOUNG PEOPLE and the FAMILY, 

It aims to be a favorite in every family — looked for eagerly 
by the young folks, and read with interest by the older. Its purpose is to 
interest while it amuses; to be judicious, practical, sensible, and to have 
really permanent worth, while it attracts for the hour. 

It is handsomely illustrated, and has for contributors some of 
the most attractive writers in the country. 

Subscription Price, SI .75. Specimen copies sent free. Please 
mention in what paper you read this advertisement. 

PERRY MASON &. CO. 

41 TEMPLE PLACE, BOSTON, MASS. 



FINE FURS. 

The best qziality of all kinds of Far s in popular use. 

Seal English Jackets, 

Seal Dolman Wraps. 

Seal Sacques. 

We give particular attention to orders by measure, and using the 
richest and most durable of genuine Alaska Seals, assure the fullest 
satisfaction in quality and fit. 

The fashionable 

BLACK BEAR BOAS, 

of exquisite fineness and beauty, made from skins of rare quality. 

Fur Collars, Capes, Cuffs, Boas, 

Hats, Sleighing Hoods and Gloves 

FUR TRIMMINGS. 



Gentlemen's Fur-lined Overcoats. 



Fur Mats and Carriage Robes. 



Joseph A, Jackson, 

412 Washington Street - - 



Boston. 



Established 1S25. 

NATHAN NEAT & CO. 

MANUFACTURERS OF 







BASKET TRUNKS AND STEAMER CHAIRS. 
Stateroom and Light-Weight Trunks for European Travel. 



SEND FOR ILLUSTRATED CATALOGUE. 

566 WASHINGTON ST., BOSTON, MASS. 

ELlAlflORNITflRE 

At Popular Prices. 



F. M. HOLMES FURNITURE CO., 

116 TREMONT ST., BOSTON, MASS. 



LEVI S. GOULD. 



FRANK A. PATCH. 



hasell Leaves, 



J 59 



EDWIN C. BURT & CO.'S 

FINE SHOES AND SLIPPERS 

FOR LADIES AND CHILDREN 

ARE THE BEST SHOES MADE. 



Fit Perfectly. 
Easy on the Feet 
Superior in Style, 



Ccst no More 

Than any Other 

Fi.ie Shoes. 




For sale by leading retail shoe dealers in nearly every city throughout the United States and 
Canada. AH widths of Lasts, any style of Shoe, Sole, Toe, or Heel. If you cannot 
■get our make of shoes from your dealers, send address for directions how to procure them. 

EDWIN C. BURT & CO., Manufacturers, 

ZtsTZEW YORK. 

SPECIAL AOENTS IN BOSTON, 



Mr. JOSEPH A. HILLS 

has removed to more commo- 
dious music rooms in 

HOTEL PELHAM, 
Cor. Trernont and Boylston Sts., 

BOSTON, MASS., 

where he will be pleased to meet 
his pupils and others for pro- 
fessional engagements. 

Competent assistants under Mr. 
Hills's supervision will attend to 
the instruction of those less ad- 
vanced who may desire lessons 
at reduced rates. 



Conductors, Concert, Opera and 
Church Singers, Pianists, Organ- 
ists, Accompanists and Teachers 
supplied at the 

TEACHERS' BUREAU, 

HOTEL PELHAM. 

BOSTON, MASS. 



COMER BROTHERS' CO. 
piai)ofor(^/T\apufy 

14th St. and 9th Ave,, New York. 

Clear, silvery, even tone through- 
out. Durable and elegant design. 
Indorsed by the profession. 

BOSTON WAREROOMS, 



Jordan, Marsh & Co., Washington st hotel pelham 

THE "PEERLESS" FOUNTAIN PEN 




IS THE PERFECTION OF FOUNTAIN PENS 

egg** B~m^$ 3™ FiEKKva? :tst=Muto 

The Cross Stylographic Pen, Stylograph* Ink. All styles of Stylographic, Fountain, and Gold Pens repaired. 



_, ._._,..., , „ J „ 6 ,„ 1 ,, 1 n "«>. "ii ai^ics ui oiyiograpmc, fountain, 

THE CROSS PEN CO., 306 Washington St 



KTESra? 3=003=2, TO ©3Li33 SQ-C7TH: CKT7EOH 



BOSTON, MASS. 



i6o 



Lasell Leaves. 



C. H. CODMAN & CO. 

Photographic Material, 

PICTURE and FRAME DEALERS' 

<A SUPPLIES t> 
W holesale and Retail Framing 

AMATEUR PHOTOGRAPHIC APPARATUS. . 
34 BROMFIELD STREET, 
BOSTON - - - MASS. 

W. H. FRENCH & CO. 

PLUMBERS, GAS FITTERS, 

AND 

SANITARY ENGINEERS. 

JUDSON'S BUILDING, OPP. RAILROAD STATION, 

WEST NEWTON. 



All Work Promptly Attended to and Warranted Satisfactory. 

LIVERY, HACK, 



•AJNTD- 



BOARDING STABLE. 



ESTABLISHED 1861. 



S. F. CATE, WEST NEWTON. 



Barge " City of Newton." 

Boat Sleigh "Snow Bird." 

H. H. NEWELL, 

DEALER IN 

BOOTS, SHOES I RUBBERS, 

Auburn Street, Auburndale, Mass. 



SHREVE, CRUMP k LOW, 



432 WASHINGTON ST. 



BOSTON. 



y(/ atcKes, ^ i amends, 
(Jewelry, 
finest (yetteru. 



New York and Beyond, 

via FALL RIVER LINE. 



ONLY $3 FOR FIRST-CLASS LIMITED TICKETS. 



SPECIAL EXPRESS leaves Boston from Old Colony Station daily 
(Sundays excepted) at 6 p. m., connecting at Fall River (49 miles) in 75 
minutes with the steamers Bristol and Providence. Heated throughout 
by steam and lighted by electricity. An orchestra on each steamer. Due 
to arrive in New York about 7.30 a. m ; connection to Brooklyn and Jersey 
City by annex boat. Returning, leave New York daily (Sundays ex- 
cepted) at 4.30 p. m. Baggage checked from hotel or residence in Boston, 
to destination. Tickets, State-rooms, etc., secured at the Line office, No. 
3 Old State House, and at the Old Colony Station. 



L. H. PALMER, 

Agt., 3 Old State House. 



J. R. KENDRICK, 

General Manager. 



^JL.H,IC]Sr <te BARRY, 

HouseandSign Painters, GTazing, Gr-raining,. 

Kalsomining and. "Whitening. 

Paints, Oils and. Varnishes constantly on hand. 

WASHINGTON ST. (near R. R. Crossing), WEST NEWTON. 
C. T. Allen. D. Barry. 

B. G. BAKER, 

COAL AND WOOD,. 

Auburndale and West ! ewton. 



Lasell Leaves. 




THOMAS HALL, 

Electrician 



■AND ■ 



Optician, 



Manufacturer and Importer of 

Telegraphic, Electric, Hag- 

netic, Hal van ic. Optical 

and >let>-oro;ogical 

Instruments. 

Chemicals, Chemictl and Philo- 
sophical Appurutu.- of ullDchcnp- 
tions. lllmtrated Catalogue of 
each Department. 

Hail's Pat Medical Batteries, 
19 BROMFIELD ST., BOSTON, MASS. 

1833, Daniel Saris, Jr. 1319, ?a!aer & Hall. 1856, Thomas Hall. 

WADSWORTH & PICKERING, 
COMMISSION MERCHANTS, AND JOBBERS IN 

BUTTER, CHEESE, EGGS, ETC. 

STALL, 89 QUINCY MARKET, BOSTON. 



Briggs Wadsworth. 



F. A. PlCKBEINC 



CHARLES H, WHITING, Formerly Hall -& Whiting, 

STATIONER and BLANK BOOK MANUFACTURER 

Importer and Jobber. Publisher and Book Seller. School and Miscel- 
laneous Books. Crane's Fine Stationery. American, English, French 
and German Fancy and Staple Stationery. Weston's Ledger Paper*. 

163 and 170 Devonshire Street, Boston. 



FROST & ADAMS, 

Importers of, and Wholesale and Retail Dealers la 

ARTISTS' MATERIALS, 

DECORATIVE ART NOVKLTIES, ART 
POTTERY, ETC. 



Ebonized Panels. 

Winsor & Newton's Colors. 

German Colors. 

French Colors. 

Tucker & Green's Colors. 

Sketch Blocks. 

Plaques of all kinds. 

China Colors. 

Mirrors for Decorating 

Artists' Boxes. 

Artists' Brushes. 

Artists' Canvas. 

Handbooks on Art. 

Studies of all kinds. 

Lustra Painting Materials. 



Water-Colors. 

Bronzes. 

Brocades. 

Spangles. 

China for Decorating. 

Paper Panels. 

Tambourines. 

Repousse Materials. 

Canvas Stretched. 

Drawing Instruments. 

Plaque Rims. 

Artists' Easels. 

Drawing Paper. 

Materials for Tapestry, etc. 

Kensington Painting Materials. 



SCHOOLS pp STUDENTS SUPPLIED 



AT LOW FIGURES. 



37 CORNHILL 



BOSTON. 



SEND FOR A CATAL03UE. 
F. S. Frost. H. A. Lawkbmcsj. 



ELLIOT W. KEYES, 

APOTHECARY, 

Haskins' Block - - - Auburn Street, 
auburndale, mass. 

FALL AND WINTER MILLINERY. 

MRS. M. H. KIMBALL, 

Dealer in FRENCH FLOWERS, HATS, BONNETS and TRIMMINGS, 

MELROSE STREET, AUBURNDALE. 

V. A. PLUTA, 

Dealer in PROVISIONS, 

Cor. Auburn and Lexin g ton Streets. 

ALFRED B RUSH, 

APOTHECARY, 

Plummer's Block, Cor. of Auburn and Lexington Sts. 

auburndale. 

u. w. farley. g. d. harvey. a. c. farley. 

FARLEY, HARVEY & CO. 

Importers and Jobbers 0/ 

JD^Z-ST • G-OODS. 

61 and 67 Chauncey, 39, 41 and 43 Bedford Sts., BOSTON. 

FARNUM &, COMPANY, 
PRODUCE COMMISSION MERCHANTS, 

Wholesale Dealers in Apples, Potatoes, Cranberries, Onions, Peas, 
Beans, Dried Apples, Oranges and Lemons. 

Nos. 108 and no Faneuil Hall Market - • BOSTON. 

Henry Farnum. W. W. Lawrence. 



GEORGE E. JOHNSON, 



■DEALER IN- 



Hay, Grain and Feed, 

Lexington Street, 

AUBURNDALE, MASS. 

CHARLES G. TINKHAM, 

Livery, Had mil Boarding Stably 

Cor. of Lexington and Severn Sts., 
AUBUODALE. 

JOHNSTON & KEYES, 

AUBURNDALE AND BOSTON EXPRESS. 



BOSTON OFFICES, 

105 Arch. Street, 
34 Court Square. 



AUBURNDALE OFFICE, 

Lexington Street, 
Near the Depot 



H. EUGENE FLEMING, PH. Q. 

PHARMACIST, 

FINE CONFECTIONERY a Specialty. 

Hear City Hall - - West Newton, Maaa. 



JUNE, 1888. 







L/^elx Le/u/<<s 



VOLUME XIII. -No. 9. 



CONTENTS. 



Editorials 163 

Lasellia Banquet 165 



The Y. W. C. T. U. 



166 



Commencement Week 166 

Letter-Writing, Old and New 170 

Reading Aloud 171 

Needles and Pins 172 



Scientific Notes 
Art Notes 
Political Notes 
Exchanges 



174 
174 
174 
174 



Locals I7S 

Personals 176 

Major and Minor 176 



Lasell Leaves. 



NOVELTIES 



■IN- 



MILLINERY 



RECEIVED DAILY FROM PARIS and LONDON, 



Ladies are invited to cail and examine before purchasing 
elsewhere. Correct Styles. Popular prices. 



HENRY M. BURR & CO. 



490 Washington Street, 



BOSTON. 



I ARTHUR P. SCHMIDT & CO. 

IMPORTERS OF AND DBALBRS IN 

FOREIGN AND AMERICAN 

Sheet Music. 

sol? Agents lor Lltolffs Celebrated Edition of 
Classical and Modern Music. 

13 and 15 West St., boston. 

Catalogues sent free on application. 

LAWRENCE, WILDE & CO. 

Manufacturert ef First-Cleut 

FURNITURE 



AND 



INTERIOR DECORATIONS, 



Nos. 38 to 48 Cornliill 



Boston. 



A. Lavrencb. 
Wm. H. Hull. 



Gho. B. Darbow. 

F. D. WlLDK. 



ESTABLISHED 1830. 



ALFRED MUDGE & SON, 

PRINTERS, 

No. 24 FRANKLIN STREET, BOSTON, MASS. 

HAVE UNSURPASSED FACILITIES FOR 

BOOK AND MISCELLANEOUS PRINTING, 

ELECTROTYPIMG AND STEREOTYPING, 

MERCANTILE AND COMMERCIAL PRINTING, 

FANCY BALL AND SOCIETY PRINTING, 



LAW WORK A SPECIALTY. 

A FULL LINE OF WEDDING STATIONERY ENGRAVED OR PRINTED. 

WEDDING OUTFITS executed in the finest manner at reasonable prices. 

Information regarding work in any department will at all times be promptly furnished, either 
personally or by correspondence. 

ALFRED MUDGE S SON, 24 FRANKLIN STREET. 






Lasell Leaves. 



161 



C. D. COBB & BROS. 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 

GROCERIES 

Of the Very Finest Quality, 

And IMPORTERS of 

-^SFANCY GRADES TEASe^ 

Etfery Article "Warranted. 



Orders of $20 and upwards Delivered at any 
point .within lOO miles of Boston. 



FOE PARTICTJLAES, SEND FOR CATALOGUE TO 

C. D. Cobb & Bros. 

722 to 7 32 Washington Street, 
BOSTON - - - MASS. 



COBB, BATES & YERXA, 

IMP OR TJSJJRS 



AND 



GROCERS. 



Twenty-dollar orders delivered free at any station 
within 50 miles of Boston, and fifty-dollar orders at 
any station in New England, at our regular retail prices. 



COBB, BATES & YERXA, 

680 to 692 Washington Street, 
3 Bowdoin Square, 

6 and 8 Faneuil Hall Square. 

Also in 

CHELSEA, FALL EIVEE and TAUNTON. 



T.-E. MOSELEY & CO. 



DEALERS IN 




, SHOES, RUBBERS, ETC. 



FOR LADIES, GENTLEMEN, BOYS, 
MISSES AND CHILDREN. 

A Large Assortment for 

YOUNG LHDIES. 



GYMNASIUM SHOES 

In Great Variety. 

ENGLISH LAST WALKING BOOTS, 

In CALF or GOAT, 
Are SENSIBLE, DURABLE, and REASONABLE in Price, 



T. E. MOSELEY & CO. 

469 Washington Street, 

BOSTON. 



GOOD MUSI C FOR ALL THE YEA R ROUND. 

Is found in such books as the following, which, when kept at hand, fur- 
nish unfailing entertainment for the player or singer. 

Song Classics for Low Voices. 

(one dollar.) 
About 50 Gems of Song by the best modern composers; Rubinstein, 
Lassen, Grieg, Gounod and others. A true treasure for Alto, Baritone 
and Bass Voices. 

SONG- CLASSICS. 

(ONE DOLLAR.) 

For voices of average compass. All selected from the best sources. 

PIANO classics. 

(one dollar.) 
An admirable collection of pieces in the best taste, by some of the best 
living composers. 

YOUNG PEOPLE'S CLASSICS. 

(ONE DOLLAR.) 

Easy pieces that will please all, young or old. 
The Good Old Songs We Used to Sing. 

($1.00 PArER; $1.25 BDS.) 
A grand good new book, which will be received with open arms in 
every household. About 120 songs, with piano or organ accompaniment. 
Each one has been a distinguished success. Many are new to the pres- 
ent generation. Mailed for Retail Price. 

OLIVER DITSON & CO., BOSTON. 

GEO. E. ALLER 



12 Winter Street 



BUTTONS, LACES, 



■ - Boston. 

YARNS, CORSETS, 



AND FANCY GOODS. 



you 



NG'S HOTEL 



EUROPEAN PLAN. 

opposite the head of STATE STREET, BOSTON. 

Ladies' entrance, Court Street, near Washington Street. 
J. R. WHIPPLE, PROPRIETOR: 



l62 



Lasett Leaves. 



HASTINGS. 



Qhe OP 



HOTOGRAPHER. 



Que offer fo Irje (sTrgnauafiriq etna Llr)der> 
©lasses, ctrjd also I® frjeir rjurrjepoas fpierjas, 
urjusual aa^err)f<2rqes, Jaofr) Top excellence of 

PHOTOGRAPHIC WORK 

arjd reetsorjerkle prices. we quorpetrjiee irje 
xnosi g/iriisfic Igpoemcfierjs npetac. 



No. 147 Tremont Street 

corner of West Street, 



BOSTON 



MASS. 



LADIES' FIE FOOTWEAR. 



We have added for Spring and Summer, many new lines, in- 
cluding specialties of which we have exclusive control. 



GYMNASIUM SHOES, 
WEDDING AND PARTY 
BOOTS AND SLIPPERS. 



HENRY H. TUTTLE & CO. 

435 Washington Street, 



BOSTON. 




THE CLASSY 






PHOTOGRAPHER 



For Lasell Seminary, 
-+'88*- 



Studio, 22 Winter Street, 



BOSTON. 



LASELL LEAVES. 



DUX FEMINA FACTI. 



Volume XIII: 



LASELL SEMINARY, AUBUpEALE, MASS,, JUNE, 1BBB. 



dumber 9, 



LASELL LEAVES. 



Published Monthly, during the School Year, 



Lasell Publishing Association 



LASELL SEMLNARY FOR YOUNG WOMEN, 



Auburndale, Mass. 



Editor-in- Chief. 
DAISY E. LLOYD. 



Local Editor. 
ALLIE GARDNER. 



Political Editor. 
SUSAN J. DAY. 

Musical Editor. 
LUCY SARGEANT. 



Scientific Editor. 
MABEL RAUM, '89. 

Art Editor. 
EDITH A. ELLIS. 



Exchange Editor. 




Business 


Manager. 


IRENE CUSHMAN. 




LINA A. 


JONES, 


'88. 




Subscription Agent. 






BLANCHE 


PRUYNE. 






TERMS, IN 


ADVANCE. 






One Copy, one year 


(incluclin 


g postage) 


• $1 


.00 


Single Numbers 






■ 15 


cts. 



ADVERTISING RATES. 



SPACE. 


3 MONTHS. 


6 MONTHS. 


9 MONTHS. 


I-I2 


column . 


#1.50 


#2.50 


$36° 


i-b 




3.00 


5.OO 


7.00 


1-4 




4.OO 


6.5O 


9.00 


1-2 




6.5O 


II. OO 


15.00 


3-4 




9.00 


I5.OO 


20.00 


1 




I2.00 


I9.OO 


25.00 



Press of Alfred Madge &■ Son, 24 Franklin St., Boston. 



" Time rolls its ceaseless course." 

Again the long-anticipated Commencement 
week has come and gone. The Class of '88 has 
passed bravely through the trying ordeals of Class 
Day evening, has condescended to be present at 
the Senior reception, has deposited its white- 
ribboned essays upon the library table, gathered 
up its goods and chattels, and departed this life, 
leaving behind it pleasant memories, its photo- 
graphs, and "a small weed, waving its would-be 
branches upon the lawn, and bearing the over- 
whelming name of the " Class Ivy." Our best 
wishes go with the class; and we think Lasell may 
well feel proud of the addition she has made to 
the hundreds of newly graduated girls scattered 
over the land. 

Lasell girls in general need renovating. We 
are all ready to devote the next three months to 
rest ; not idleness, but twelve weeks of pleasant 
change of work and play, beneficial to both body 
and mind. It is scarcely necessary to say that 
the staff wishes every one a good time, the very 
best kind of a time. Our bon voyage \o the Euro- 
pean party was heartily given, and we hope many 
reports to the effect that they are having a jolly 
time will come floating over the pond to us 
during their absence. We trust the members of 
the Faculty will thoroughly, enjoy the vacation. 
Though temporarily deprived of our watchful 
care, we beg them to conduct themselves as we 
would desire, — in their usual dignified and striking 
manner, casting all tendency to frivolity to the 
winds, just as they would if the orbs of the one 
hundred and fifty Lasell girls were levelled at 
them. We inform this august body of our pur- 
pose to report, if we hear of any one of them 
meandering across lawns on French heels, wearing 
any jewelry, with the exception of a very plain 
pin and an engagement ring, going out evenings 
with the deliberate intention of sitting on stone 



164 



Lasell Leaves. 



walls, escorting their gentlemen callers to the 
front doorsteps ; in fact, breaking any one of 
our stringent rules. The editorial staff mean to 
give themselves time to breathe, and also mean to 
be good — not too much so, for Miss Sheldon has 
been known to say, " The good die young " ; and 
Miss Sheldon's speeches are implicitly believed 
in by at least one member of said staff, who con- 
siders her a cut-and-dried guiding star in the 
manifold difficulties of an editor's life. The staff 
do not wish to leave this earth until the " Tariff 
Bill " has been finally settled, the last round 
fought in the " Fisheries Question," and it has 
been decided whether it is or is not best for 
the welfare of the nation to have a " self-governed " 
list at Lasell Seminary for Young Women, 
Auburndale, Mass. When these momentous 
questions have become things of the past, the 
staff have no further use for life, — unless some- 
thing equally engrossing turns up. 

We will leave you now, although we dislike to 
tear ourselves away. Perhaps you notice that we 
have remained faithful to the last,' even after the 
very slowest girl had gone. 

Only one word more : let us whisper to you 

that the whole Commencement week was most 

gratifying, a little better than the most sanguine 

of us had hoped. Everything glided along, as it 

were ; even Nature was dressed in her best to add 

to our happiness. 

>-•-" 

What could be more enchanting than this " quiet 
village of homes " in the spring of the year ? 

It has seemed to us this year that everything 
is a little greener, a little brighter, a shade more 
beautiful, than ever before. We have had hard work 
to stay indoors for study, in these last weeks. We 
have longed to be out all the time. Everything in- 
vited us to throw our books aside and enjoy nature. 

Happy indeed is the one who is fortunate 
enough to be a dweller among us in May and 
June. There is no lack of amusements then. 
There are numerous excursions out into the 
beautiful country surrounding us, one of the most 
delightful being the drive to Mr. Hunnewell's, in 
Wellesley, where we go to see the finest collection 
of azalias and rhododendrons in this country, be- 
sides many other interesting sights in his large 
grounds. 



What could be more pleading to the eye than 
our own grounds, with their wealth of beautiful 
trees, smooth lawns, and well-kept driveways. 
How we do enjoy the tennis, the boating on the 
Charles, — an ideal river for that purpose, — the 
moonlight horseback rides to Echo bridge, where 
we are delighted with the wild beauty of the spot, 
the walk down the long path, overhung with a 
perfect bower of the greenest kind of green foli- 
age, to the " frog pond," — that quiet spot where 
everything is peace itself, until a. little gnat takes 
up its habitation there, and causes us to depart, 
preferring the longer walk, along the river bank 
to the Weston bridge, which suits us even better 
than the former, and is minus the gnats. 

Then the drives, — miles and miles of the most — 
well we must not gush/ We want you to realize 
why Lasell is so charming in the spring, and that 
nature spreads beauty with a very lavish hand in 

Auburndale. 

*-*-* 

The year which had so propitious a beginning 
has had an ending equally satisfactory. As the 
days passed by everything has gone smoothly 
along, with very little to mar the completeness. 

We have had a rich store of lectures this year. 
We remember with pleasure the instructive and in- 
teresting course on " The Principles of the Com- 
mon Law," by Mr. Hemenway, — the first lengthy 
course of lectures we had. Judge Park's talks 
remain pleasantly in our memories, as do also the 
practical lectures on " Home Sanitation," by Miss 
Talbot, of Boston. Recently we enjoyed Miss 
Scull and Miss Rowe, who came last on the list. 

These are by no means all the lectures of the 
year; we could name a dozen more; but every 
reader of the " Local " column must have already 
discovered that our mental cultivation has been 
well provided for. The recent exhibition in the 
gymnasium speaks for itself, and shows that our 
physical welfare has received due attention. Miss 
Ransom has reason to congratulate herself upon 
the success of the exhibition. The work was truly 
excellent. Besides the gymnasium, we have the 
morning calisthenics, drill twice a week, and as 
much tennis, boating, and out-door exercise as we 
could reasonably demand. 

No one can say that the moral side of our 
natures is neglected at Lasell. We have been 



Laseil Leaves. 



165 



labored with even more earnestly than usual this 
year, and the good results of the work are very 
evident to us all. 

There is only one more point on which we wish 
to touch, and that is, our social life. Poor social 
life ! we have little to say in your favor; you are 
an utter failure; no one has cared for you, or 
thought you worth a moment's consideration. We 
would have almost forgotten you ourselves but for 
the timely intervention of the several vacations, 
when we were obliged to meet you. After briskly 
burnishing up our memory of you, in the privacy of 
our own rooms , we managed to make a fairly credit- 
able showing through the vacation, and then came 
back to Laseil, and forgot you. No one read a news- 
paper column in chapel, to show us that this was 
not as it should be ; and we were not called to the 
"second floor centre," and reprimanded for it; 
nor did we find a " Suggestion " in our rooms, 
pointing out the way we must twt go. 

The series of afternoon teas given last year was 
a pleasant break in the routine of school life ; it 
was a relief to have something a little different 
from the usual entertainments, and, being allowed 
to converse freely with the guests, we realized for 
once that we were too much within ourselves at 
Laseil. We have wondered why these entertain- 
ments have not been repeated this year. 

The columns of the Leaves have carried not a few 
broad hints to the world this year, but nobody has 
even noticed them, did not read them probably. 
This is discouraging ; but we bob up like a cork, and 
it takes a whole Ohio flood to dampen our ardor 
where any improvement at Laseil is at stake, so 
we launch once more, hoping this question will be 
thought worthy of consideration. 



THE LASELLIA CLUB BANQUET. 

Can it be that June with all its school festivi- 
ties is here again ? Indeed it is true ; and the al- 
ways-festive Lasellians did their best to give it a 
grand entrd. 

We all know a good thing when we see it, and 
hear it, and taste it ; and surely we had a fair 
chance to experiment in each of these directions 
Thursday evening, May 31, at the Lasellia ban- 
quet. To begin with, we saw what a little work, 
a few decorations, and some taste can do for a 
bare club-room. Ours was certainly transformed 



that evening, and we only wished it might remain 
so. 

We had almost forgotten, before supper was 
announced, that we went for any other reason 
than to get acquainted with the Seniors, for they 
have kept themselves so absorbed in their studies, 
and aloof from the rest of us during the entire 
year, that we felt almost as if we were entertaining 
strangers, — that is, until we got acquainted. But 
when some one whispered " supper," and the 
dining-room doors were thrown open, displaying 
the tastefully decorated tables, we realized that a 
secret craving we had unconsciously been enter- 
taining was about to be satisfied. The tables 
were placed in the form of a T, Mae Stafford, the 
toast-mistress, being seated between the two ends 
of the cross-piece, with the Seniors and guests on 
either side. As for the supper, we all acknowl- 
edged that Mr. Lee had catered to our taste ex- 
actly ; and, to give everything additional flavor, 
five of our own club girls acted as waitresses. 

After a short exordium, the toast-mistress pro- 
posed a toast to " Our Guests," to which Miss 
Stafford made a charming response, convincino- 
us of the truth of the statement of which we 
may have been a little incredulous hitherto, — 
that Annex maidens are a little more clever 
than ordinary girls, after all. Next, the Seniors 
were toasted in a manner most flattering to them. 
We expected them to be a little rattled, but they 
took it as composedly as if they had a supper 
given to them every night in the year. The re- 
sponse, by Miss Bushnell, showed that frequent 
toasting had only formed a sort of crust around 
that reverend body, of which she was the repre- 
sentative, and that they were fire-proof. Miss 
Jones replied in rhyme to the S. D. toast, and 
she was so applauded that the acting president 
thought seriously of running for the club mallet 
to subdue the enthusiasm. The toast to the 
Laseil Battalion was brief and inaudible, but 
actions speak, etc. And the finish with which 
the salute was given and returned by Capt. 
Bogart* spoke volumes for the Battalion, not 
to mention what Miss Bogart said in its behalf. 
Of course the omnipresent Faculty could not be 
forgotten, and a toast was proposed to them. Our 
regret that they could not respond in person was 
overcome when Miss Ewing supplied the vacancy, 



i66 



Lasell Leaves. 



for we felt that she alone could do them justice ; 
and we think she did. Last of all our own Club 
was honored. Miss Law responded. Her words 
gave evidence of a true club spirit, as well as a 
Senior's knowledge of how a thing should be 
done by a Senior. But the charm of all lay in 
the entirely impromptu nature of her remarks, to 
which she called our attention as she displayed 
the closely written pages preparatory to reading 
her speech. 

Before leaving the table a number of the girls 
were favored with gifts, which were presented 
with remarks more or less suggestive in their char- 
acter ; but as all were given in good faith they 
were received kindly, and the merriment which 
they caused made a happy termination to the alto- 
gether enjoyable evening. L. C. R. 

»-•-« 

A sketch of this years work of the Lasell Y. 
W. C. T. U. may interest some of its former mem- 
bers, and others of our readers as well. 

From the seven members left us from last year 
it has grown into a society of about fifty, with 
Miss Beckwith as president, Miss Raum, vice- 
president, Miss Thomas, secretary, and Miss 
Hax, as treasurer. It has proved a very pleasant, 
and in some ways, a helpful year, though time 
could not be found for much outside work. 

In the fall Miss Frances Willard addressed the 
school, and through her a number were led to join 
our ranks. 

The regular meetings have been held on the 
first and third Sundays of each month, as usual. 
The ten departments have been distributed among 
the members, at their request, and at the different 
meetings articles have been read representing these 
departments. We have also had appropriate 
poems, which have made the meetings doubly 
pleasing. 

As " every little helps," a small sum was sent 
to Chicago, towards the great amount needed for 
the Temperance Temple to be erected there. The 
society contributed also about half the amount 
needful to purchase a hand-painted bannerior the 
Marcella Street Home for orphan children of in- 
temperate parents in Boston. 

This spring the society and members of the 
school had the pleasure of hearing Miss Bessie 
Gordon speak. She suggested having honorary 



members ; so, during the Easter vacation, a few 
names were secured and triumphantly brought 
back. 

Last month Miss Tobey addressed the '' Y ' 
and its friends,* after which a reception was held 
in the parlors ; a very pleasant evening and a few 
new honorary members were the result. 

At the last meeting the following officers were 
elected for the coming year : — 

Miss M. Packard, president ; Miss F. Freeman, 
vice-president ; Miss Skinner, secretary, and Miss 
Buntin, treasurer. 

In the president's parting words the wish w-.is 
expressed that we all wear our white ribbons on all 
occasions. Shall we not all try to remember this ? 

Let us hope that next year may prove as pleas- 
ant and successful as the present one has been. 

A Member. 



COMMENCEMENT WEEK, 
"puvef? e^tampf 3ttm S>teg !" 

Thursday. 
The Commencement concert ushered in the 
festive " last week " of '88's school life. 

The gymnasium was well filled with the friends 
and relatives of the members of the class, who 
listened with evident pleasure to the following 
programme : — 

PROGRAMME. 

FIRST PART. 

PIANO-FORTE. Scherzo in B flat minor .... Chopin 

MISS CURTIS. 

CHORUS. Ave Maria H-uber 

ORPHEAN CLUB. 

PIANOFORTE-QUARTETTE. 

Overture, " Merry Wives of Windsor " .... Niccolai 

MISSES HOLDEN, CHAPIN, SPELLMEYER, AND MR. HILLS. 



CHORUSES. 



a. The Arrival, 

b. The Departure 

ORPHEAN CLUB. 



From " Sleeping Beauty," Lake 



Soloists : 
SONG. Margreta . 



MISSES DAWES AND McBRIER. 



Jensen 



MISS GIBBONS. 

PIANO-FORTE AND VIOLIN. Andante in F . Beethoven 

MISS THRESHER AND MR. NOWELL. 

SECOND PART. 

CHORUS. A Streamlet full of flowers .... Caracciolo 
ORPHEAN CLUB. 

PIANO-FORTE. Capriccio, Op. 22 . . . . Mendelssohn 

MISS GRAY. 
(Accompanied on second piano-forte by Mr. Hills.) 

Slumber Song (Violin Obligato by Mr. Nowell) 
MISS BARBOUR. 



SONG. 



Mattel 



Lasell Leaves. 



167 



VOCAL QUARTETTE. Moonlight .... Hollander 

GETHERELA QUARTETTE: MISSES BARBOUR, GIBBONS, H. 

BEACH, AND SUTTON. 

PIANO-FORTE QUARTETTE. Hebrieden Overture Mendelssohn 

MIS ES GRAY, HOLDEN, LAW, AND OLIVER. 

CHORUS. Oh! Skylark, for thy Wing Smart 

CHORUS CLASSES. 

The selections by the piano-forte quartettes 
were rendered in a spirited manner, and received 
great applause. Mr. Nowell's Andante in F 
was a pleasant feature of the programme, and 
highly appreciated, as his playing always is, by 
the Lasell girls. The singing of the Getherela 
Quartette was unusually excellent, and received 
a merited encore. Miss Barbour's '-Slumber 
Song," with violin obligalo, was admirably ren- 
dered, as were the several selections sung by the 
Orphean Club. Too much cannot be said in 
praise of the work done in the club this year. 
Mr. Davis has worked hard, with what success we 
can judge after hearing the very excellent singing 
at the concert Thursday evening. We may be 
pardoned for the pride we take in our chorus 
class, when we have heard such flattering com- 
ments from our outside friends all the year. The 
platform was decorated with flowers and palms, 
and the large pleasant room was brightened by 
the light costumes of the girls, who, on account of 
the warm evening, r'evelled in summer attire. 

Sunday. 

The baccalaureate sermon was preached be- 
fore the members of the graduating class, by Dr. 
Andrew Peabody, of Cambridge, assisted by Dean 
Huntingdon and President Warren, of Boston 
University. Dr. Peabody's text was from 2 Peter 
i. 5 : "Add to your faith virtue; and to virtue, 
ki.owledge." Dr. Peabody said that his first 
thought in looking over the faces of such a class as 
was before him, where he could see only intelli- 
gence and alertness, was of the change that came 
about in a short time, even in a very few years. 
Some of the class, perhaps, had become noble 
women, while others had attained a standard no 
higher than that of a gossip, or a flirt, spending 
their days in discovering new methods of killing- 
time, and amusing themselves generally. He re- 
marked that the difference was suggested by his 
text of the morning. Faith was the corner-stone, 
Virtue the completed foundation, and Knowledge 



the superstructure, built on earth, to be made 
eternal in heaven. Sometimes the structures fell 
to pieces, leaving only heaps of rubbish, while 
others endured for years. Dr. Peabody reminded 
us, in his earnest and impressive manner, that we 
could do little in our lives without the grace of 
God in our hearts, which ennobled all our natures, 
and made our culture amount to something. 

Dr. Peabody's closing words were listened to by 
the fourteen members of the class standing. He 
said : — 

" Young ladies of the graduating class, you are preparing 
for your commencement, that is, for a beginning, not a close. 
Such is the meaning of the word. In the European univer- 
sities of the Middle Ages a student at a certain stage of his 
education received his first degree, the terms of which 
licensed him to lecture, that is, to give instruction in the 
university of which he was still a member, whenever his 
services should be needed. This was called his commence- 
ment, because he then began to be a pupil teacher. This is 
precisely what you, in going hence, ought to be; nay, in 
some sense will be and must be for your lives long. There 
are, no doubt, some of you who will be teachers by profes- 
sion. If so, you will be teachers only so long as you are 
learners. As the sparkling, limpid, and refreshing spring 
stagnates, dries up, and disappears when the fountain that 
feeds it ceases to flow, so will you, whatever your attain- 
ments, become vapid, obsolete, and worthless in your office 
when you close your mind to the incoming of new truth and 
fresh thought. Mark Hopkins in his eighty-sixth year was 
still growing in his unsurpassed teaching power, and never 
had so strong a hold on his pupils as when, from the class- 
room, which he had made his sanctuary, he was called with 
hardly a moment's warning to the heavenly temple; and to 
the very last he kept the hospitable ear and mind ever open, 
still a humble and docile learner, while a kingly spirit among 
the great teachers of the land. ( >n the other hand, I could 
recall from my memory not a few who are brilliant teachevs 
whose light paled and died in early or middle life simply be-' 
cause, in their own conceit knowing enough, they ceased to 
learn. But whatever your mode -of life may be you will 
none the less be pupil teachers, receiving from without or 
from above guiding, shaping, controlling influences, and to a 
degree impossible at an earlier age. If your lives are not 
hallowed by Christian faith and virtue, you will become more 
and more adepts in those refined and subtle arts of self-culture 
by which the tendrils of the spiritual nature are detached from 
the tree of life and twined around trees of withering leaf and 
fading blooms, and as you learn you will teach, and may 
so teach, souls thai Gbd shall have given into your special 
charge. 

" But we hope better things of you. We would have you 
pupils in the school of Christ, sitting with Mary at his feel. 
drinking in the sweetness, loveliness, beauty of his holiness. 
Pupil teachers, too, you cannot but be in the whole art and 



i68 



Lasell Leaves. 



science of pure and holy living, diffusing a sacred influence 
that shall grow with your years, shall be a winning grace for 
all within its sphere, and shall outlast on earth the memory 
of your names. Pupils in Christ's school may you be not in 
this world alone but in heaven followers of the Lamb 
whithersoever he goeth — pupil teachers there, too; for must 
it not be from the redeemed among the children of men that 
go forth the ministering angels of God's love, who call home 
to their Father's house from the realms of ignorance, sorrow, 
and sin those who shall be heirs of his salvation? " 

Monday — Class Day. 

PROGRAMME. 
PRESIDENT'S ADDRESS, 
ROLL CALL, 
CLASS HISTORY, 

SONG. " Whate'er Betide." Willard. 
STATISTICS. 
POEM. 

CLASS PROPHECY. 
PIANO SOLO. " Caprice in A Major." 
MEMENTOS. 
LAST WILL AND TESTAMENT OF '88 



A. Lina Jones. 
Bertha Adaline Simpson. 
Annie Morton Gwinnei.l. 
Mary Lulie Hogg. 
Mary Louise Coi.e. 
Maudie Lovena Stone. 
Helen Louise White. 
Jessie May Law. 
Susannah Jane Brown. 



Anne Overman Bushnell. 

LAWN EXERCISES. 
IVY ORATION. Mary Bourne Hathaway. 

PRESENTATION OF SPADE. Josephine Estelle Baker. 

BURNING OF BOOKS. ELEGY. 

Elizabeth Howland Davis Eddy. 

CLASS SONG. 

WRITTEN BY MARY LOUISE COLE. 

Through the strife we 've come victorious, 

And at last a happy band, 
We are gathered here together 

Ere we scatter through the land. 
P)Ut though trials have beset us, 

As we look at them to-day, 
They appear but tiny storm-clouds, 

Which long since have passed away. 

Although happy in our freedom, 

We cannot from tears refrain, 
As we think of the dim future 

Which we may not meet again. 
When, in places we 've frequented, 

Unfamiliar ones will roam, 
While the class we loved so dearly 

Is a thing to them unknown. 

With the burning of the pages, 

Over which our eyes have bent, 
Comes the mournful truth upon us 

That our school-days now are spent. 



And though we may be forgotten, 

In our hearts will ever dwell 
Love and tenderness unfailing 

For the old home at Lasell. 

Contrary to the usual custom on Class Day, 
the indoor exercises were held in the gymnasium, 
as that room accommodated more than the chapel ; 
but, notwithstanding its capacity, the friends of 
the Seniors were so numerous many were obliged 
to stand. The Juniors, with that taste which has 
characterized all their efforts during the week, — 
and they have not played an unimportant part, — 
had m-ade the platform attractive with graceful 
foliage plants, daisies, and here and there a bright 
scarf carelessly draped on the pianos, and the 
easel supporting a group picture of the graduating 
class. Very soon after the hour appointed for the 
exercises to begin there was a suggestive stir in 
the back part of the room, and all heads were 
turned to watch the line of black-robed figures, 
who came with ' aspect stern and gloomy stride," 
and made their way to the front seats. These 
were, of course, the Seniors. Very dignified and 
solemn they appeared, slightly conscious, no 
doubt, of the interest with which each of their 
movements was watched. 

It was hard to have to apologize for the non- 
appearance of the programmes, for such pains had 
been taken to have them here in time ; but their 
absence did not detract from the success of the 
entertainment in the least, for everything came as 
a delightful surprise, — and unexpected pleasures 
are always most enjoyable. 

We will not speak of the individual triumphs, 
for only the very best of everything could come 
from our Class of '88, as all who are acquainted 
with it can testify, and to those who cannot claim 
the honor of an acquaintance, we can only say, 
with the spring poet, that the limitations of 
language hedge our souls with too many inade- 
quacies. 

After a most inspiring rendition of the class 
yell, the guests were invited to the lawn, where 
they were soon followed by the Seniors and torch- 
bearing Juniors, who made their way to the 
"Crow's Nest," under which the "ivy" was planted 
with due formality. The spade was then pre- 
sented to the Class of '89, by whom it was very 
gracefully received. Then came the burning of 



Lasell Leaves. 



169 



the books, which, to a casual observer, seemed to 
be consigned to the flames with more than willing- 
ness ; but casual observers do not always know ■ 
and we believe that in their hearts the girls parted 
reluctantly with these friends which have been so 
closely associated with them in their life at Lasell. 
The singing of the class song ended the pro- 
gramme; but half an hour or more was spent by 
those who were fortunate enough to have an escort 
— and by some who were not' — in walking about 
the grounds, whose decorations of biight-colored 
Chinese lanterns blended their soft rays with 
those of the electric light, and gave a weird pic- 
turesqueness to the scene. 

Tuesday. 

They have a queer and altogether original way 
of doing things at Lasell, and one of (he oddest 
things is the fact that they expect a poor girl, 
who never had even a glance at the " Senior re- 
ception," to sit down and write up a glowing 
account of everything that happened on that 
eventful evening. Now, as we were not there, did 
not even have an invitation, the only thing we 
can do under the peculiar circumstances is to tell 
what we have heard about the reception. This is 
what we heard : The parlors, and in fact the whole 
lower floor of the seminary, were thrown open to 
the guests of the evening, who wandered at will 
through the well-known rooms. The guests were 
ushered into the presence of Mr. and Mrs. Brag- 
don and the Seniors by members of the Ju- 
nior class, and were introduced in the approved 
style, after which they were allowed to enjoy 
themselves as they wished. Refreshments were 
served in the dining-rocm, and the girls who 
last year played the part of waitresses at the re- 
ception, in their turn were waited upon by the 
Junior class of this year. The several parlors 
were most artistically decorated with flowers, 
ferns, and plants in profusion, and in the hall an 
orchestra from Boston discoursed sweet music 
throughout the evening. Finally some one said 
that every one had a good time, the friends of the 
class present were numerous, and altogether the 
reception was a success. 

Now we will tell you what we saw for ourselves. 
We were up in the third story, where we had been 
banished for the evening. There was a friend's 



window conveniently near ; we walked over and 
looked out. We stayed there for about five min- 
utes, charmed with the scene before us, then we 
went back to our room, for we were '-self-gov- 
erned." The night was all that could be desired, — 
cool, pleasant, and quiet. From the " Crow's 
Nest" a line of Chinese lanterns was swung 
across the road to the first tree, and so on in 
front of the seminary, until the opposite end of 
the grounds was reached, making a most fairy- 
like scene. All along the piazza were placed at 
intervals these same fascinating lanterns, while 
high above them the new electric light burned, 
brilliantly lighting the surrounding grounds. Way 
down in one corner of the lawn a red light cast 
its shadows across the road upon the smooth 
lawn of the Atalanta Tennis Club ; and over in 
the opposite corner electric light number two did 
its share in illuminating. The driveway was 
occupied by numerous carriages, which in turn 
deposited their occupants at the front door, and 
drove away to return later. 

To our regret only one Senior appeared upon 
the scene ; but we made the best of her. She 
was dressed in white, of course, and had a great 
many ribbons and bows sewed in just the correct 
style upon her gown. She carried a huge bouquet 
of white roses in her hand, and walked very fast 
along the piazza, followed by a very tall man car- 
rying her fan, and trying his very best to keep 
pace with her. Just as we thought we had seen 
who she was, and what shade her gloves were, 
she disappeared, and we were left alone, to be 
edified the next moment by a glimpse of Lewis, 
as he flitted by in immaculate white gloves and a 

new suit. 

Wednesday. 

At half past ten o'clock the long line of hatless 

girls began to move towards the Congregational 

church. When the foremost couple reached the 

door they parted, one to the right, one to the left 

of the driveway, and faced each other. Their 

example was followed by the others, until the end 

of the line was reached, when Mr. and Mrs. 

Bragdon, who came last, passed between the two 

files into the church, followed by the teachers, 

alumna:, Seniors, and — the girls, who, in this day 

of days, were of no consequence whatever. We 

found the church well filled, and after the Boston 



i'7o 



Lasell Leaves, 



Cadet Band had rendered a short selection, prayer 
was offered by Dr. Clarke, of Newton Centre. 

Miss Sarah F. Smiley delivered the address, from 
the text, " Woman's wisdom buildeth her house.'' 
Her earnest words will remain in our hearts for 
many a clay, and there was not one of us who did 
not feel a thrill of sympathy as she showed what the 
possibilities of our future lives might be, if we 
appreciated our privileges, utilized our time advan- 
tageously, and grasped the opportunities before 
us with the strong purpose of making our lives 
noble, useful ones.' 

Miss Wallace's " Good-bye for the Class" was 
most impressive, and very gracefully given 

The first prize, a gold loaf, for the best bread 
made in the' cooking class, was awarded to Miss 
Hathaway ; and the second, a silver loaf, to Miss 
Law, both of whom weie members of the graduat- 
ing class. 

Mr. Bragdon then said a few words, after which 
he presented the diplomas to the graduates, whose 
names and subjects of whose essays are as fol- 
lows : — 

Josephine Estelle Baker; "The University, 
Ancient and Modern." 

Susannah Jane Brown ; " George Eliot's Men 
and Women." 

Anne Overman Bushnell ; " A Century of New 
England Literature." 

Mary Louise Cole; "The English Essay." 

Elizabeth Howland Davis Eddy; " Character 
and Nature, as represented by the Earlier and 
Later English Poets." 

Annie Morton Gwinnell ; "The Puritan and 
Cavalier in American History." 

Mary Bourne Ha*haway ; " Legends of North 
American Indians." 

Mary Lulie Hogg; "A New Back-Log Study." 

Jessie May Law; " Homeric Heroism." 

Bertha Adaline Simpson ; " The Literary Salons 
of Paris." 

Maude Lorena Stone; "Our Development of 
the Labor Question." 

Josephine Wallace ; "Journalism and the Comic 
Journal." 

Helen Louise White ; " Distinctive Anglo-Saxon 
Literature." 

Anna Reliance Jones ; " Representative Works 
of Goethe and Schiller." 



After the exercises in the church lunch was 
served upon the lawn, as usual, for the friends and 
relatives. At half past three o'clock the reunion 
of the Aluninse Association was held in the chapel 
The address was given by Mrs. S. L. Baldwin, 
who chose for her subject, " Woman, her present 
Opportunity and Responsibility." The other ex- 
ercises consisted of a piano solo by Miss M I. 
Stafford, '86 ; a vocal solo, sung by Miss Gertrude 
M. Rice, '8 1 ; and the reunion hymn, written by 
Mrs. Lillie Fuller Merriam, '85. After the chapel 
exercises the members of the alumnae enjoyed 
their annual supper, and so another Commence- 
ment was ended. 

In the evening only a few of the girls remained. 
They amused themselves in a quiet way, until an 
organ-grinder wended his way into the grounds, 
ousing the usual excitement, and beguiling even 
certain members of the staff from their work long 
enough for them to gather the surplus remaining 
from their '• mite-box" money together, to enclose 
it in conspicuous white and dash it at the smiling 
Italian under the sanctum window. 

"Rah, rah, rah! rah, we yell! Ootoginta 
Octo of Lasell." 



LETTER-WRITING, OLD AND NEW. 

It would be amusing, if it were not humiliating, 
to note the gradual backsliding in the art < f letter- 
writing, from the letters of the apostles to their 
beloved people, and, later, of Cicero and his con- 
temporaries, down to the prestnt voluminous 
epistle of the school-girl, which nothing describes 
so well as its own disparaging finis: " I knew it 
must have tired you to death." It is scarcely fair 
to take these last productions as types of the pres 
em letter, for there are still men and women to 
whom has been given the natual gift in letter-writ- 
ing, and one who receives a gracefully wiitten 
letter from such as these is still charmed in the 

old way. 

Can fancy picture anyone leaving a letter from 
Mme. cle Stael for a game of tennis, or Mr. 
Lewes waiting until he finishes his bieakfast to 
read one of George F Hot's earnest conversations 
on paper ? 

Why is it that now, our correspondents take no 
more thought for our pleasure than to regard a letter 



Lasell Leaves. 



171 



lo us as so much blank paper which must be filled ? 
Indeed, we are sometimes tempted to believe that 
the beginning and end are written at a proper dis- 
tance apart, the intervening space measured, and 
the exact number of words necessary ascertained, 
and put down without regard to any law of se- 
quence. 

No one now cultivates the art of letter- writing ; 
no one thinks it worth while. 

The only way to account for this is, perhaps, 
that there are not the inducements there once 
were. Letters are torn up and thrown into the 
wabte-basket as soon as read. Mails aie more 
frequent ; three mails a week our fathers were 
limited to; while three mails a day give us an extra 
course at each meal. If we had it too often, we 
should not relish a Neapolitan ice at breakfast. 
We are probably suffering from what may be 
called epistolary nausea. 

Letter-writing, too, not only used not to be lim- 
ited to men and school-girls, but it is even said that 
women have been the best letter-writers. In that 
case, another excuse for our degenerating may be 
that in the past, work in the fields of study, in 
temperance, in missions, and in business was not 
open to women, as it now is, and consequently she 
no longer has more leisure for letter-writing than 
the stronger sex. She is not likely in choosing her 
life work to step aside, and, among so many pos- 
sible occupations, give the preference to the simple, 
unremunerative one of letter-writing. Unremuner- 
ative only in a mercenary sense, for how can one 
be better paid than by the pleasure of his fellows? 

There will come a time when the present will 
belong entirely to history. Time will have more 
nearly finished his story, and will have written a 
chapter about us. What will it be, and how will it 
compare with preceding chapters ? Why can we 
not bring our standard of letters back to its for- 
mer height, and leave snatches of our life and hap- 
piness for others to enjoy ? For in nothing can 
we show ourselves in our best light more than in 
conversation; and letters are, or rather should be, 
written conversations purely. 

The essentials to a charming letter are few. 
First comes a hearty desire to phase on the part 
of the writer. Wit, humor, and earnestness are 
all involved in this purpose. Secondarily, there 
is simplicity; for if one stops to think how to make 



the letter sound well, the reader sees the effort at 
once, and the fascination is lost. With so few 
directions to follow, so simple a formula, — if \\e 
can write by formula, — why is there any need for 
our American woman to contrast unfavorably, in 
this line, with her great-grandmother? 

Might we not fancy that our light language 
could be more easily managed, allowing more free- 
dom in our letters, than the Latin, with its rushed 
endings to stumble over. And yet Cicero is 
taken as a type of a perfect letter-writer. He was 
accused even of travelling, simply that he might 
fascinate with his letters those whom he found 
implacable to his eloquence and entreaty. 

Even if we are not writers for posterity, is there 
no inducement to make happy the lives of others, 
shorten the long partings, and carry good influ- 
ences to those who are alone? Letters are best 
which are written as one thinks; and the art of 
letter-writing will be fully mastered, or rather, re- 
mastered, when nature is allowed full sway. 

E. W. H. 

READING ALOUD. 

What is it to read well ? It is to concentrate 
your mind on the meaning of the author, and con- 
vey it clearly to others, with an utter forgetfulness 
of self ; for self is the great enemy to good read- 
ing. 

First of all, in order to read well one must 
think well, then be able to express his thoughts in 
his voice. It is necessary to think each word in 
order to express it. I dare say some sceptical 
persons will say here, "What nonsense! Think 
such an unimportant little thing as a word ! " 
But it is merely because they have not given any 
thought to it. A word is of great importance. 
It consists of a body and a soul. The soul is 
the cause of the word, and the body the effect. 

The law of all the arts applies to reading. "■ In 
order that the whole may be accomplished, each 
word must be given its own individuality, and its 
proper relation to the other words." To see the 
application of this 1-aw in another art, take piano- 
playing : each note must have its full value and. 
proper tone, in order that the whole may harmo- 
nize. Also painting: the outline must be correct, 
and the lights and shades have their own individ- 
uality, in order that the full effect may be attained. 



172 



Lasell Leaves. 



The voice and the articulation of the word are 
as separate as the clay and mould; for the voice 
comes from the feeling in the soul, and the articu- 
lation from ihe thought. Yet, in order to have 
the reading perfect, the feeling and thought must 
be one. 

One thing of very great importance in reading 
aloud is a good voice. A voice that will not 
cause your listener to fee), " How dreadfully her 
voice grates on my ears ! I can think of nothing 
but it ! " I have heard a good voice beautifully 
illustrated, as having three parts : the oil, corn, 
and wine ; or, flexibility, strength, and brilliancy. 
I have been told people did not always have 
such trouble with their reading as we of the 
present day have. Years ago people were per- 
fectly sincere, and meant exactly what they said. 
If any one saw a beautiful sunset, and wished a 
friend who was not present to know what it was 
like, he would immediately describe it on a 
piece of paper, and send it to his friend, who, on 
reading it, would feel, " What a glorious sunset ! " 

One time a young man had written some beau- 
tiful thoughts about a sunset ; he presented them 
to a young woman of his acquaintance. She, 
finding them so delightful, hastened to tell her 
friends. When she read the thoughts, her whole 
mind was concentrated on making these friends 
see the sunset as she had. The result was, that 
they were in raptures over it. But one of them, 
prompted by an imp, said to her, "That 
was a glorious sunset ! But how beautifully you 
did read it ! " In a second the evil was done. 
Naturally, she was highly flattered by the compli- 
ment, and began to think, " If I read that so 
well, I ought to be able to read others in the 
same way." So the next poem she read to her 
friends, she kept thinking, "Oh! how beauti 
fully I am reading this ! " But imagine what was 
her surprise upon finishing it to find that they 
had all left the room (for they were honest folks, 
and could not express what they did not feel), 
except one, who remained behind the rest. She 
immediately asked him why they had all left the 
room, upon which he replied, " I do notk now 
how it was, but you made us think more of your- 
self than of what you were reading." Of course 
she felt dreadfully on hearing this ; but the mis 
chief was done ; she never again was able to read 



as she had before self-consciousness appeared. 
At length the Devil came to that part of the 
world, in the shape of an elocution master, and 
he taught the people all manner of ridiculous 
things: to raise the voice in sa\ing one word, to 
drop it in saying another ; to make this motion, 
and to make that motion ; till finally people grew 
to be extremely unnatural : every movement was 
premeditated. In reading, the sense of what 
they read never once troubled them. Thus, as 
the years went by, things grew worse and worse, 
until a few years ago, when we began to try to 
reverse our steps, and at the present time we are 
nearer to where the sincere people were before 
destructive self appeared. 

To sum up good reading, we will say that " it 
is the operation of a perfectly sincere soul through 
a perfectly free body." 



NEEDLES AND PINS. 

It has always been a source of much wonder- 
ment to me where needles and pins go when they 
are lost. Think of the number that are lost every 
day, and of the very few that are found ! Now 
there must be some place where these needles and 
pins go, and the other night the whole thing was 
revealed to me. 

I had been asleep but a short time, when I 
heard the door of my room opened softly from 
without. I looked in amazement to see who it 
could be, and there in the bright moonlight stood 
a tiny old woman. She was about a foot in 
height, and wore a long, dark cloak, with a hood, 
which was drawn over her face, so I could not 
catch a glimpse of it. 

I dared not speak, and so, thinking herself un- 
seen, she entered the room. Over the floor she 
flitted, so light and airy did her motions seem, till 
she reached the table. Then she suddenly rose, 
borne aloft by some invisible power, until she was 
within reaching distance of the pin-cushion. 
From it she took some needles and pins which I 
had recently placed there, and put them in a 
leather bag which she carried. 

In an instant it flashed across my mind that this 
was the cause of the rapid disappearance of the 
needles and pins in my cushion nearly every 
night. I always had plenty of them the last thing 



Lasell Leaves. 



173 



at night, but in the morning, especially when 
there was need for haste in preparing for break- 
fast, or when there must needs be a button sewed 
on, there was very often a scarcity of needles 
and pins, and my toilet therefore delayed. 

The coolness with which she possessed herself 
of my property exasperated me beyond measure, 
and I determined to interview her on the subject ; 
so, when she had accomplished her errand, and 
was about to leave the room, I said to her, in not 
very gentle tones, " Who are you, and what right 
have you to help yourself to my needles and 
pins ? " 

She turned quickly at my words, and threw off 
her hood, looking toward me with her sharp eyes. 
I could not see her features very distinctly, but the 
impression I gained of the face was that it was 
extraordinarily keen and sharp. 

She looked at me for a few seconds, and then 
replied, in a high-pitched voice, the very sound of 
which suggested needles and pins, " What ! have 
you never heard of the pin collector? " 

" Never," I said ; "but do tell me about her." 

" I am she," said she ; " and I must say I think 
your education has been sadly neglected if you 
have never heard of me and my numerous assist- 
ants." 

I saw that I had incurred her anger, and I 
strove to conciliate her by meekly telling her that 
on that point my education had been neglected ; 
but that was no fault of mine, for I had often 
thought about the strange disappearance of nee- 
dles and pins, and had made up my mind that 
somewhere there must be those who had a knowl- 
edge of the matter, and who could account for it. 

She seemed quite pleased to find me so inter- 
ested in her work, and so she began to tell me 
about herself. 

"With the invention of needles and pins," she 
said, "I came into existence, and I have literally 
worn myself out in the performance of my duty as 
needle and pin collector. As people and needles 
and pins increased in number I was obliged to 
employ assistants, and now I have an innumerable 
throng of them. At first I did the whole business 
of collecting and using the needles and pins, but 
now I find that the gathering and disposing of 
them occupy all my time. ' What becomes of 
the pins and needles after they are collected?' do 



you ask ? It has hitherto been a profound secret, 
carefully kept from mortals; bu: as you manifest 
so kindly an interest in my work, I will tell you. 

" Each one of my helpers has a certain mission 
to perform, and when there is need he is able to 
quickly transfer himself from one place to another. 
The mission of one, for instance, is to forever tor- 
ment the man who has acquired wealth by unfair 
means. Needles are left in his recently repaired 
clothing, which constantly annoy him, but of 
which he cannot rid himself. Pins are placed in 
the chairs in which he sits, in all his so-called 
pleasures, in fact, in all he attempts. We give 
him no peace, and we find plenty of ways in 
which to torment him, so long as he remains self- 
ish and grasping. 

" Oftentimes, in places of amusement, parties 
and social gatherings, by thrusting in a pin or 
needle here and there, we manage to make this 
or that person thoroughly uncomfortable when he 
expected to spend an evening of unalloyed pleas- 
ure. Sometimes when persons are engaged in 
conversation, by deftly inserting a needle in this 
or that look, or a pin in this or that word, we 
cause much hard feeling between the persons. 

" In school we find a continual use for pins. 
If a scholar fails in recitation we manage to 
make him very uncomfortable by means of a few 
pin-thrusts. 

" But there is one particular occasion when 
needles and pins may be employed that we never 
fail to make the most of. That time is the hour 
you assemble in the church to hear the seniors' 
graduating essays. Then the young ladies fall 
a prey to our torture. When one rises to read her 
essay, by means of these small articles of torture 
we succeed in causing her hands and knees to 
shake in a most annoying manner. If she is con- 
scious that her production is rather dull and un- 
interesting her nervousness is much increased, 
and when she takes her seat she is exceedingly ill 
at ease. 

" On some scholars our needles and pins have 
little or no effect ; but we can drive others almost 
to desperation by our thrusts." 

She finished speaking, and I, feeling much in- 
terested in her story, strove to draw her out still 
more by my questions. She answered only in 
monosyllables, however, and at last, when I be- 



174 



Lasell Leaves. 



c ame too inquisitive, she answered sharply, "Ask 
me no more questions; lest I try my tiny instru- 
ments of punishment on you." I opened my 
mouth to ask one more question, when I felt a 
sudden sharp pricking sensation, and I rose at 
once to a sitting posture. The moonlight streamed 
into the room, but there was nothing to be seen. 
On the cushion the needles and pins glistened 
brightly, and everything was quiet and undis- 
turbed, and it gradually dawned upon me that I 
had dreamed. 



SCIENTIFIC NOTES. 



A Vienna engineer named Fischer has just 
taken out a patent for a new smoke-abating pro- 
cess. He proposes, by means of electricity, to 
condense the solid part of the smoke as it arises 
from the coal, the carbon thus solidified falling 
back in the furnace. 

An electrical wire as the legal mode of capital 
punishment would be in accord with the fitness of 
current things, remarks an Albany exchange. 
Electrical wires are taking life in every direction 
without warrant of law, and with the political cur- 
rents running and political lightning making its 
appearance in all the heavens, even the political 
wires are of an electrical character. 

Telegraph poles are preserved in Norway by 
making an auger -hole about two feet from the 
ground, in which four or five ounces of sulphate of 
copper, in coarse crystals, are placed, and plugged 
in. The chemical is gradually absorbed by the 
wood until its whole outer surface turns to a 
greenish hue. The sulphate requires an occa- 
sional renewal, and is said to be a perfect preserv- 
ative. 

A company has been formed in Berlin to manu- 
facture electrical matches. Two small cells and 
a small electric motor take the place of the ordi- 
nary movement. 

A Louisville company proposes to utilize the 
natural gas supply of Indiana, and have asked of 
Congress permission to lay conduit pipes upon or 
beneath the Ohio River for the purpose of piping 
natural gas, petroleum, or salt-water from Indiana 
into Kentucky. 



ART NOTES. 

The well-known Bohemian artist, Vacslar Brozik, 
has lately received from the Emperor of Austria 
the decoration called " Litteris et Artibus," which 
has recently been created by the Emperor as the 
highest distinction to be given to the most promi- 
nent artists and literati of the Austro-Hungarian 
Empire. This decoration consists of a large gold 
medal, with the portrait of the Emperor Franz 
Josef, and is to be worn, like the grand croix of 
any order, on a red ribbon round the neck. Some, 
weeks ago two other celebrated painters, Mun- 
kacsy and Masejko, received the same high dis- 
tinction. 

Sir Noel Paton's new picture, "Vigilate et 
Orate," which he has painted for Queen Victoria, 
is now being exhibited through England, before 
being permanently placed above the altar in the 
private chapel at Osborne. 



POLITICAL NOTES. 

President Cleveland has been renominated 
for the office he now holds. 

Allan G. Thurman is the nominee for the 
Vice-Presidency. 

The lumber schedule of the Mills Tariff Bill was 
completed by the lower house of Congress on 
Tuesday. All manufactured lumber is placed on 
the free list. 

A bill has been passed by both houses of Con- 
gress reviving the grade of general of the army. 
The President nominated Lieutenant-General 
Sheridan to the position. 

Bills have been proposed to establish addi- 
tional Cabinet offices, one a Department of Agri- 
culture and one of Labor. 



EXCHANGES. 

The University of Bologna, the oldest university 
now in existence, will celebrate its Sooth anniver- 
sary on the nth, 12th, and 13th of June. — Ex. 

Wellesley boasts of a young lady so modest 
that she goes into another room to change her 
mind. — Ex. 

A well-written sketch of the life of Matthew 
Arnold is one of the good things in anew exchange, 



Lasell Leaves. 



175 



the University C)nic, from the University of Ver- 
mont. 

A father of sixty-four and a son of twenty-four 
graduate from a Western college in June, and are 
rivals for class honors. 

The four leading female colleges in the United 
States are Wellesley, with 620 students ; Vassar, 
with 283 ; Smith, with 367, and Bryn Mawr, with 
79. 

A Chinese girl recently took the highest honors 
of her class in Woman's Medical College in New 
York Ciiy. She could converse in and write ac- 
curately five languages. 

Thank vou, Mr. Record, of Yale, for the com- 
pliment paid to your friends at Lasell. We regret 
sincerely our inability to accept your kind invita- 
tion : it was proffered too late ; they are all 
promised. 

It is proposed to raise a memorial to the late 
Matthew Arnold in Westminster Abbey. 






LOCALS. 
Hot weather is here, and so are mosquitoes. 
" Please stop-talking." 

"Open the windows, and those without pait- 
ners step to the front." 

Monday morning, May 21, about forty of us, 
including three or four guests, took the 8.15 
train at the Old Colony station for Plymouth, ar- 
riving there at about ten o'clock. The day was a 
delightful one. We first went to the famous mon- 
ument, then to Plymouth Rock, and the old cem- 
eteiy. At twelve, all were ready for lunch. In 
the afternoon we visited the Court House, but 
spent most of our time examining the old relics 
in Pilgrim Hall. We returned to the seminary at 
about half past five. Thanks to Mr. Shepard for 
his great kindness and consideration in making 
the day so pleasant. 

As it was decided by a committee of one that 
those entering chapel after the tolling of the bell 
should be reported as absent, Miss Senior said, 
" /am absent." 

The " S. D." Society banquet was held June 
2, and was, as usual, a most enjoyable affair. 



Tuesday evening, May 8, under the direction 
of Mr. Walter Davis, a concert was given in Au- 
burn Hall, by the Orphean Club and Mixed 
Chorus, assisted by Miss Gertrude Bryant, Mr. 
George Parker, Mr. Willis Nowell, and Mr. J. 
Wallace Goodrich. The programme presented 
was very entertaining, and the concert was pro- 
nounced a " great success," — the finest ever 
given in Auburndale. 

The proceeds, amounting to about two hundred 
dollars, were given to Mr. Frank Butler. 

On Friday and Wednesday evenings, May 18 
and 23, a gymnastic exhibition was given in the 
gymnasium. The girls went through their parts 
with great ease and grace. On the first evening, 
the " run and jump" called forth considerable 
applauding, and we understand that it was the 
cause of much of the excitement shown in the 
gallery. 

At Yale, in May, measles were the rage ; at 
Harvard and the Tech., mumps; but they 
couldn't get ahead of Lasell, where the pink-eye 
was the thing. We also had a case of mumps. 

On the afternoon of May 17, about thirty of us 
were given into the care of Professor Cassedy,, and 
started off for a drive to Mt. Auburn and Cam- 
bridge. All thoroughly enjoyed the afternoon. 

Professor Cassedy has been called to be prin- 
cipal of Norfolk College, Norfolk, Va. 

It is his intention to make the college an attrac- 
tive school home for girls who spend their winters 
South, as the place, which is just across the river 
from Old Point Comfort, eight miles from Hamp- 
ton Roads, is quite a winter resort. 

Professor Cassedy has been at Lasell four 
years, and brought his wife two years ago. They 
will be greatly missed by all. 

The Oxford caps and gowns, worn for the last 
few days of school, added greatly to the dignity 
of the Seniors. 

" How is the earth divided ? Why, by earth- 
quakes." 

Having been told to write the Commandments, 
a conscientious Senior wrote as one of them, 
'' Thou shalt not lie." 

Girls, have a jolly time this summer, but with 
all your fun don't forget to "z" and "breathe." 



1 76 



Las ell Leaves. 



PERSONALS. 

Lena J. Kaul, of Tiffin, Ohio, who was a La- 
s*Tl girl in 1882, is now Mrs. Richard Carpenter, 
and lives at No. 518 Crawford Street, Terre 
Haute, Ind. 

Mrs Gertrude Benyon Parker's address is 
620 Woodland Avenue, Kansas City, Mo. 

Mr. Thomas White, of Bangor, Me., sent a 
splendid specimen of the Penobscot River salmon 
to Principal Bragdon, for which all the household 
hereby send thanks. 

Genie Converse went out to Gunnison. Col., 
to visit Mrs. Georgia Hatch Jones, and "met her 
fate " in Mr. A. B. Mathews, a partner in business 
of Mr. Jones. 

During the last year Mr. Jones has conducted 
a prosperous real-estate business in Kansas City, 
and removed his family there. Mrs. Jones will 
spend the summer with friends in Denver. 

Mrs. Alice Linscott Hall, Springfield, Mo., 
disappointed us in not fulfilling her promise to 
keep especially here the tenth anniversary of her 
graduation, but she " did want to come to the dear 
old school home, — no dearer place to me in all the 
world." 

Another of the same class writes: "What 
'78ers will be there ? I don't see why the West-' 
ern Lasellites do not organize and meet in Chicago 
or Cincinnati : other schools have their meetings. 
We could send four delegates." 

Miss Eleanor Le Huray, a sister of Miss 
Louise, sailed from New York, May 26, for her 
new mission work in Buenos Ayres. 

Married. — In Cincinnati, Ohio, June 13, Miss 
Mary Ebersole and Mr. Henry Crawford. 

Married. — At Hartford, Conn., May 31, Miss 
Hattie J. Hanmer and Mr. Mark T. Robbins. 

" At home " after June 19, at Hotel Capitol, 
Hartford, Conn. 

Mr. and Mrs. Edward Payson Call, Miss 
Langley, Miss Louise Hammond, and Miss Whip 
pie were numbered among the guests at the Senior 
reception. 

Saturday, June 2, the Misses Flint made La- 
sell a little visit. 

We were glad to see the face of Edith Gale, in 
May. 



We hear of Mrs. Alice Dunsmore Van Harlin- 
gen, of La Porte, Indiana, as we like to hear, a 
wife and mother, extending her influence in the 
community, and "keeping up" musically, and 
otherwise, her place as one responsible, in her 
measure, for the advancement of all that is best in 
life. 

We hear of Maggie Grether as visiting Miss 
Boston, and of Lydia Dougan and Maggie Hamil- 
ton as well, indirectly. We regret to learn of the 
death of Miss Hamilton's brother. 

Let us hear from you, girls. Old girls expect us 
to tell them of you. 

Among the guests at the annual supper of the 
Lasellia Club were Miss Stafford, Miss Upton, 
Miss Sayford, Miss Foster, and Miss Stearns. 



MAJOR AND MINOR. 

A fugue is a form of music in which the right 

hand says to the left hand, 

" If fugue get there before I do, 
Tell them I 'm a-coming too." 

With the closing of the Symphony Concerts the 
Boston musical season practically ends. The 
London musical season opens at about the time 
that of Boston comes to a close. The season just 
opening bids fair to be unusually brilliant. 

It is rumored that Hans Richter is to succeed 
Wilhelm Gericke as conductor of the Boston 
Symphony Orchestra, when the latter shall have 
fulfilled his term of years with Mr. H. L. Hig- 
ginson, in that capacity. 

Mr. Cowen's "Ruth" has been given six 
times in Great Britain, which is very good for a 
new work, the first season-. 

Miss Emily Winant will sing with the Handel 
and Hayden Society next year. 

In Binghamton, N. Y., the mandolin has made 
for itself a notable place both socially and pub- 
licly, and is much enjoyed. 

" It is difficult," wrote the correspondent of an 
English paper, " to say what' are the mysterious 
conditions of musical leadership. They are cer- 
tainly nearest akin to the qualities of a great mili- 
tary commander, and one can only agree with the 
good old Emperor William, who, himself entirely 



Lasell Leaves. 



177 



innocent of musical knowledge, said, after Wag- 
ner's performance of the Beethoven C minor 
Symphony, at Berlin, " Now you see what a good 
geneial can do with his army." 

A copy of the "High-Caste Hindu Woman" 
was received by the library from Mrs. Eliza- 
beth Thompson, of Stamford, Conn., as a 
gift. Judging from the label inside, the library 
of Lasell is only one of many, selected to receive 
this donation. Probably Mrs. Thompson takes 
this wise method to aid Pundita Ramabai in her 
work in India, and to enlighten and interest the 
young of America — possibly of other countries 
— by the revelations of this interesting and valua- 
ble book. We accept the gift with gratitude, 
sympathize with the motives, and rejoice in the 
good work it may do, especially in schools where 
it may be less known than in our own. 

The Statesman's Year-Book of '88 has only re- 
cently made its appearance in our library. The 
purchase of it has been long neglected. 

The girls will be grieved to hear that Lewis was 
quite seriously hurt Commencement Day. He was 



driving a wagon heavily loaded with trunks to the 
station, when his horse suddenly fell. The unex- 
pected jerk threw him from the seat, under the 
wheels, which passed over his back and lower 
limbs. The injury, though painful, was not danger- 
ous, and we were pleased to see him limping round, 
with the aid of a stout cane, before we left. 

AMATEUR PHOTOGRAPHIC OUTFITS, 

All Siz=s and Styles at Loweat Prices. 

BENM. FRENsCH: & CO. 

319 Washington Street - - Boston, Mass. 

EL. H. HTJ NT, 

CARPENTER AND BUILDER, 



WEST Nl 
Shop near E. E. Crossing, 



:wton. 



MASS. 

P. 0. Box 235. 



WADri Q. pn CARRIAGE AND WAGON RUILDERS, 
WnilD Ot UUij Cor. Elm and Washington Sts., near City Hall, 

■W -E S T IT IE "W T O iT . 

Fine Carriages and Wagons of any description built to order and War- 
ranted to give satisfaction. Carriage. Painting and Repairing in all its 
branches promptly and thoroughly executed at fair prices. The Repair- 
ing of Fine Carriages a Specialty. 

Carriages Sent for and Returned Free of Charge. 



EMERSON 



FINEST TONE, 

BEST WORK AND 

MATERIAL. 



Established in 1849. 




Nearly 

50,000 Made 

J^NTD I1ST USE. 

Every Instrument Fully Warranted. 



PRICES MODERATE AND TERMS 
REASONABLE. 



PIANOS. 



ILLUSTRATED CATALOGUES FREE. 



EMERSON PIANOS. 



BOSTON, MASS. 




■OSEPH #3 

** STEEL** PE 



A 



5 



THE FAVORITE NUMBERS, 303,404, 332,351, 170, 

AND HIS OTHER STYLES 

SOLD by ALL DEALERS throughout the WOULD. 




178 



Lasell Leaves. 




BLANKET WRAPS FOR BABY. 

Blanket wraps for the nursery, the bath, the 
sick room, or steamer travelling, for men, women, 
children, and the baby, at Noyes Bros'. 

Morning and evening wedding outfits in shirts, 
collars, cravats, and gloves a specialty, at Noyes 
Bros'. 

English mackintosh coats for ladies and gentle- 
men, at Noyes Bros'. 

English silk umbrellas in gold, silver, and natura 
wood handles, ladies' and men's, $2.75 to $35 00' 
very rare and choice designs, at Noyes Bros'. 



Lawn Tennis and Yachting Suits. 

Flannel, 

Madras, 

English, 

Cheviots 

and Silk 

Shirtings 



For Travelling Shirts, 

" Railway Cars, 

" Steamer Wear, 

" House Night Wraps, 

" Bath or Sick Room, 

" Hunting and Fishing, 

" Lawn Tennis, 

" Office and House Coats. 



NOYES BROS. 

Lawn Tennis shirts, coats, trousers, belts, 
sashes, and caps, ladies' blouse waists, from 
best English and French Flannels and Oxfords, 
at Noyes Bros'. 

Boys' Waists in Flannels, Cheviots,' and Ox- 
fords; Flannel Office Coals, English Hold-alls, 
Steamer Wraps and Rugs, at Noyes Bros'. 

English Travelling Rugs for railway and 
steamer use, $3.75 to $50.00, at Noyes Bros'. 

English Dressing-gowns, Study Coats, House 
Coats and Office Coats, and Long Wraps, $5.00 
to $45.00, in stock or to measure, at Noyes 
Bros'. 

NOYES BROS., 

Hosiers, Glovers, and Shirt Makers, 

WASHINGTON AND SUMMER STREETS, 

BOSTON, U. S. A. 



DRESS SHIRTS 

For Weddings and Receptions. 

The present fashion of Shirts, with Linen 
Cords, Embroidered Figures, and Spot Bosoms, 
may be had of Noyes Bros., most thoroughly 
and elegantly made. 

We have a Special Department for Re- 
pairing Shirts, Hosiery, Underwear, Gloves, 
or any article belonging to Gentlemen; can be 
laundered and repaired at short notice, at Noyes 
Bros'. 

There are 81 offices in Boston who advertise 
Troy Laundry. Messrs. Noyes Bros, are 
the only /louse in Boston that actually sends 
goods there. 

We send the work every day, and return in 
five days, and give new goods for any damaged. 

Special Laundry Department for 

Dress Shirts, Vests, and Wash-Scarfs. Re- 
laundered equal to new goods, at Noyes Bros'. 

Family Latindry "Work called for and 
returned with no extra charge. 

NOYES BROS., 

Hosiers, Glovers, and Shirt Makers, 

WASHINGTON AND SUMMER STREETS, 
BOSTON, MASS., U. S. A. 



ESTABLISHED 1817. 



JOHN H. PRAY, SONS & CO. 

Importers. Jolliers, Retailers anil Manufacturers' Agents. 

Carpetings, Mattings, Oil Cloth, 

ORIENTAL RTJGS, 

CARPETS AND UPHOLSTERY. 



558 and 560 Washington St., 

30 to 34 Harrison Ave. Extension, 



BOSTON. 



113 Worth Street 



NEW YORK. 



Lasell Leaves. 



179 



A. STOWELL & CO. 

24 Winter Street, Boston. 



£oirie of ou* Specialties : 

Bohemian Garnet Jewelry. 

Amber Beads and Ornaments. 

Tortoise-Shell Hair Pins. 

Choice Leather Goods. 

Oxidized Silver Jewelry. 

Fans for all occasions. 

Pearl Opera Glasses. 

Fine Gold Jewelry. 

Wedding Presents in Clocks, Vases and 
Bronzes. 

LATEST NOVELTIES IN ALL DEPARTMENTS. 

Lowest Prices. 



< 
o 

o 

o 

w 
o 

I — I 

PQ 

* 

o 
w 

o 




YOUNG LADIES' 

BOOTS, SHOES AND SLIPPERS, 

Stylish and Durable at Moderate Prices. 

GYMNASIUM SHOES A SPECIALTY. 

Thayer, McNeil Sc Hodgkins, 

47 TEMPLE PL. - - BOSTON. 

The thoroughness of construction, elasticity of 
action, depth, sonority, and singing quality of tone, 
evenness in all the registers, and unrivalled artistic 
designs in cases have made the 

HALLET & DAVIS HA1 

the favored instrument in such celebrated institutions 
as the Lasell Seminary, Leipsic Conservatory of 
Music, Chicago Musical College, New England 
Conservatory of Music, and the musical public 
generally. 

WAREROOMS, 

179 TF^EJVIONT STREET, 

Boston, Mass. 



C. B. Woods. 



H. J. Wood. 



C. B. WOODS & CO. 



MANUFACTURERS OF 



Fine Furniture, 

Upholstery, Draperies, Wood Mantels 
and Interior Finish. 

OFFICE AND WAREROOMS, 

105 and 107 Chauncy Street, Boston. 
JOHN J. O'BRIEN, 

Picture Frames 

01 Every Description, Wholesale and Retail. 

OLD FRAMES ZEfc IE G-IIi T. 

69 CORNHILL, BOSTON. 



ESTABLISHED IS-^O. 



Isaac Locke & Company, 

Produce Commission Merchants, 



And Dealers in 



FOREIGN and DOMESTIC FRUITS 

97, 99 and 101 Fanenil Hall Market, and Basement 18 South Side, 

BOSTON - - - MASS. 

<8S~ Telephone Connection 



i8o 



Lasell Leaves, 



^-WEBER ; S-x- 

25, 27 TEMPLE PLACE - - - BOSTON, 

AJSTD 33 WEST STREET, 

Ladies' and Gents' Restaurant, 

Oysters and Salads a Specialty. 

OPEN AFTER THEATRES. 

Caterer for Wedding Breakfasts, Lunches, Dinner and Evening Parties 

and Receptions. Also, Club Suppers at Short Notice 

and Reasonable Prices. 

S. "VST. BAILEY, 

DEALER IN 

WATCHES, JEWELRY, SILVERWARE, ETC. 

353 Washington Street, Boston. 

Jewelry Neatly Repaired. Also, Monograms on Coin Pieces. Personal 
Attention given to Repairing Fine Watches. 

ESTABLISHED 1847- 



AARON R. GAY & CO. 

No. 122 State Street, Boston, 

STATIONERS 

AND 

BLANK BOOK MANUFACTURERS, 



First-Class Account Books of any desired 
pattern made to order. 

S. S. GAY. EDWIN W. GAY. 

JUST WHAT HAS BEEN WANTED. 

A LADIES' LUNCH ROOM 

HAS BEEN OPENED AT 

23 AVON STREET, BOSTON. 

A quiet, neat place, where a nice Lunch can be had at a very reason- 
able price. All the ladies say, " Isn't it nice ? " 

T. D. COOK, Caterer. 

ALSO, 

"Wedding and other Parties 

Served with the Choicest Viands, and by Competent Waiters. 

SUPERIOR ICE-CREAM 

DELIVERED AT REASONABLE PRICES. 



-¥' 



THE 



--4- 



YOUTH'S COMPANION, 

A WEEKLY PAPER FOR 

YOUNG PEOPLE and the FAMILY, 

It aims to be a favorite in every family — looked for eagerly 
by the young folks, and read with interest by the older. _ Its purpose is to 
in'.erest while it amuses; to be judicious, practical, sensible, and to have 
really permanent worth, while it attracts for the hour. 

It is handsomely illustrated, and has for contributors some of 
the most attractive writers in the country. 

Subscription Price, $1.75. Specimen copies sent free. Please 
mention in what paper you read this advertisement. 

PERRY MASON &, CO. 

41 TEMPLE PLACE, BOSTON, MASS. 



FINE FURS. 

The best quality of all kinds of Ftirs in fopidar use. 

Seal English Jackets, 

Seal Dolman Wraps. 

Seal Sacques. 

We give particular attention to orders by measure, and using the 
richest and most durable of genuine Alaska Seals, assure the fullest 
satisfaction in quality and fit. 

The fashionable 

BLACK BEAR BOAS, 

of exquisite fineness and beauty, made from skins of rare quality. 

Fur Collars, Capes, Cuffs, Boas, 

Hats, Sleighing Hoods and Gloves. 

FUR TRIMMINGS. 

Gentlemen 's Fur-lined Overcoats. 

Fur Mats and Carriage Robes. 

Joseph A. Jackson, 

412 Washington Street - - Boston. 

Established 1825. 

NATHAN NEAT & CO. 

MANUFACTURERS OF 



TRUNKS AHD TRAVELLING BAGS. 

BASKET TRUNKS AND STEAMER CHAIRS. 
Stateroom and Light-Weight Trunks for European Travel. 



SEND FOR ILLUSTRATED CATALOGUE. 

^66 WASHINGTON ST., BOSTON, MASS. 

ELEGANT FDRHITDRE 

At Popular Prices. 



F. M. HOLMES FURNITURE CO., 

116 TREMONT ST., BOSTON, MASS. 



LEVI S. GOULD. 



FRANK A. PATCH. 



Lasell Leaves. 



181 



EDWIN C. BURT & CO.'S 

FINE SHOES AND SLIPPERS 



FOR LADIES AND CHILDREN 



ARI 



TH 



Fit Perfectly. 
Easy on the Feet, 
Superior in Sty 1& 



BEST SHOES MADI 

Cost no 2Iore 



Other 
we Shoes. 




For sale by leading retail shoe dealers in nearly every city throughout the United States and 
Canada. All widths of Lasts, any style of Shoe, Sole, Toe, or Heel. If you cannot 
get our make of shoes from your dealers, send address for directions how to procure them. 

EDWIN C. BURT & CO., Manufacturers, 

USTZEW YORK. 

SPECIAL AGENTS IN BOSTON, 

JORDAN, MARSH & CO., WASHINGTON ST. 



Mr. JOSEPH A. HILLS 

has removed to more commo- 
dious music rooms in 

Hotel Pelham, 

Cor. Tremont and Boylston Sts., 

BOSTON, MASS., 

where he will be pleased to meet 
his pupils and others for pro- 
fessional engagements. 

Competent assistants under Mr. 
Hills' s supervision will attend to 
the instruction of those less ad- 
vanced who may desire lessons 
at reduced rates. 



Conductors, Concert, Opera and 
Church Singers, Pianists, Organ- 
ists, Accompanists and Teachers 
supplied at the 

MUSIC TEACHERS' BUREAU, 

HOTEL PELHAM, 

BOSTON, MASS. 



CONOVER BROTHERS' CO. 
piai)ofort^/T)ai)ufy 

14th St. and 9th Ave., New York. 

Clear, silver;/, even tone through- 
out. Durable and elegant design. 
Indorsed by the profession. 

BOSTON WAREROOMS, 

Hotel Pelham. 



THE "PEERLESS" FOUNTAIN PEN 




IS THE PERFECTION OF FOUNTAIN PENS. 

Is a hard rubber holder fitted with a 16 k. gold pen of the best manufacture, and will never wear out. It will write ten thousand words with one 
filling of ink, and for taking lectures, etc., it is indispensable. There is no loss of time in dipping ink as with the ordinary pen, as the " Peerless " 
has a perfect, even and uninterrupted How of ink, and is the best fountain pen manufactured. Price, !#i'i.O(). 

The Cross Stylographic Pen, Stylographic Ink. All styles of Stylographie, Fountain, and Gold Pens repaired. 



THE CROSS PEN CO., 306 Washington St. 



BOSTON, MASS. 



west xioois to oijXj sotjtb: CXXTTieCIX. 



182 



Lasell Leaves. 



C. H. CODMAN & CO. 

Photographic Material, 

PICTURE and FRAME DEALERS' 

<A SUPPLIES > 
W holes ale and Retail Framing 

AMATEUR PHOTOGRAPHIC APPARATUS. 

3-4- BROMFIELD STREET, 

BOSTON - - - MASS. 

W. H. FRENCH & CO. " 

PLUMBERS, GAS FITTERS, 

AND 

SANITARY ENGINEEBS. 

JUDSOfVS BUILDING, OPP. RAILROAD STATION, 
WEST NEWTON. 



All Work Promptly Attended to and Warranted Satisfactory. 

LIVERY^ HACK, 



AHSTI3 



BOARDING STABLE. 

ESTABLISHED 1861. 

S. F. CATE, WEST NEWTON. 



Barge "City of Newton." 

Boat Sleigh "Snow Bird." 

H. H. NEWELL, 

DEALER IN 

BOOTS, SHOES^ RUBBERS, 

Auburn Street, Auburndale, Mass. 



SHEEVE, CRUMP k LOW, 



4P WASHINGTON ST. 



BOSTON. 



\!(/ atches, ^[j iamoricls, 
(welru, 



c* 



finest (rotteru 






New York and Beyond, 

via FALL RIVER LINE. 



ONLY $3 FOR FIRST-CLASS LIMITED TICKETS, 



SPECIAL EXPRESS leaves Boston from Old Colony Station daily 
(Sundays excepted; at 6 p. m. , connecting at Fall River (49 miles) in 75 
minutes with the steamers Bristol and Providence. Heated throughout 
by steam and lighted by electricity. An orchestra on each steamer. Due 
to arrive in New York about 7.30 a. m ; connection to Brooklyn and Jersey 
City by annex boat. Returning, leave New York daily (Sundays ex- 
cepted) at 4.30 p. m. Baggage checked from hotel or residence in Boston 
to destination. Tickets, State-rooms, etc., secured at the Line office, No. 
3 Old State House, and at the Old Colony Station. 



L. H. PALMER, 

Agt., 3 Old State House. 



J. R. KENDRICK, 

General Manager. 



A.TjJjTQN & BARRY, 

House and Sign. Painters, G-lnzirag, G-raining, 

Kalsomining and "Whitening. 

Paints, Oils and Varnishes constantly on hand. 

WASHINGTON ST. (near R. R. Crossing), WEST NEWTON. 
C. T. Allen. D. Barry. 

B. G. BAKER, 

COAL AND WOOD, 

Auburndale and West Newton. 



Lasell Leaves. 




THOMAS HALL, 

Electrician 



•AND' 



Optician. 



Manufacturer and Importer of 

Telegraphic, Electric, Mag- 
netic, Malvanic. Optical 
and Meteorological 
Instruments. 

Chemicals, Chemical nnd Philo- 
Baphicul Apparatus of all Descrip- 
tions. Illustrated Catalogue of 
each Department. 

tali's Pat Medical Batteries. 
19 BROKFIELD ST., BOSTON, MASS. 

1835, Saniol Davis, Jr. 1842, Palmer & Hall. 1S5S, Taomai Ball. 

WADSWORTH & PICKERING, 

COMMISSION MERCHANTS, AND JOBBERS IN 

BUTTER, CHEESE, EGGS, ETC. 

STALL, 89 QUINCY MARKET, BOSTON. 

Eriggs Wadsworth. F. A. Pickering- 

CHARLES H. WHITING, Formerly Hall h Whiting, 
Stationer and blank book Manufacturer 

Importer and Jobber. Publisher and Book Seller. School and Miscel- 
laneous Books. Crane's Fine Stationery. American, English, French 
and German Fancy and Staple Stationery. Weston's Ledger Papers. 

163 and 170 Devonshire Street, Eoston. 



FROST & ADAMS, 

Importer* of, and Wholesale and Retail Dealer* la 

ARTISTS' MATERIALS, 

DECORATIVE ART NOVELTIES, ART 
POTTERY, ETC. 



Ebonized Panels. 

Winter & Newton's Colors. 

German Colors. 

French Colors. 

Tucker & Green's Colors. 

Sketch Blocks. 

Plaques of all kinds. 

China Colors. 

Mirrors for Decorating. 

Artists' Boxes. 

Artists' Brushes. 

Artists' Canvas. 

Handbooks on Art. 

Studies of all kinds. 

Lustra Painting Materials. 



Water-Colors. 

Bronres. 

Brocades. 

Spangles. 

China for Decorating. 

Paper Panels. 

Tambourines. 

Repousse Materials. 

Canvas Stretched. 

Drawing Instruments. 

Plaque Rims. 

Artists' Easels. 

Drawing Paper. 

Materials for Tapestry, etc. 

Kensington Painting Materials. 



SCHOOLS fp STUDENTS SUPPLIED 

AT LOW FIGURES. 

37 CORNHILL - - BOSTON. 

SEND FOR A CATALOGUE. 
F. S. Fkost. H. A. Lawrbmck. 



ELLIOT W. KEYES, 

APOTHECARY, 

Haskins' Block - - - Auburn Street, 
auburndale, mass. 

FALL AND WINTER MILLINERY. 

MRS. M. H. KIMBALL, 

Dealer in FRENCH FLOWERS, HATS, BONNETS and TRIMMINGS, 

MELROSE STREET, AUBURNDALE. 

V. A. PLUTA, 

Dealer in PROVISIONS, 

Cor. Auburn and Lexington Streets. 

ALFRED BRUSH, 

APOTHECARY, 

Plummer's Block, Cor. of Auburn and Lexington Sts. 

auburndale. 

n. w. farley. g. d. harvey. a. c. farley. 

FARLEY, HARVEY & CO. 

Importers and Jobbers of 

JDJE^^T * G-OODS. 

61 and 67 Channeej, 39, 41 and 43 Bedford Sts., BOSTON. 

FARNUM &. COMPANY, 
PRODUCE COMMISSION MERCHANTS, 

Wholesale Dealers in Apples, Potatoes, Cranberries, Onions, Peas, 

Beans, Dried Apples, Oranges and Lemons. 

Nos. 108 and no Faneuil Hall Market - . BOSTON. 

Henry Farnum. W. W. Lawrence. 



GEORGE E, JOHNSON, 



■DEALER in- 



Hay, Grain and Feed, 

Lexington Street, 
AUBURNDALE, MASS. 

CHARLES G. TINKHAM, 

Livery, Had and Boarding: Slla 

Cor. of Lexington and Severn Sts., 
AUBURKDALE. 

JOHNSTON & KEYES, 

AUBURNDALE AND BOSTON EXPRESS. 



BOSTON OFFICES, 

103 Arch Street, 

34 Court Square. 



AUBURNDALE OFFICE, 
Lexington Street, 
Near the Depot 



H. EUGENE FLEMING, PH. G. 

PHARMACIST, 

FINE CONFECTIONERY a Specialty, 

Hear City Hall - . West Hewton, Mass. 



r " ~ V MliUlBHflnUI 




OCTOBER, 1888. 




L/15ECC lEfwfqs 



VOLUME XIH-.-N0. 1. 



CONTENTS. 



Editorial 3 

What to Avoid 6 

A Third Party Needed 6 

A New Back-Log Study 7 

In Memoriam 10 

Success 11 

Marriages u 

If we had but a Day 12 



Personals 12 

Locals 14 

New Students 15 



Scientific Notes 
Political Notes 
Musical Notes 
Art Notes 
Exchanges 



IS 
15 
15 
16 
16 



Lasell Leaves. 



COBB, BATES & YERXA, 

IMP OR TURS 



AND 



GROCERS. 



Twenty-dollar orders delivered free at any station 
within 50 miles of Boston, and fifty-dollar orders at 
any station in New England, at our regular retail prices. 



COBB, BATES k YERXA, 

680 to 692 Washington Street, 
3 Bow&oin Square, 

6 and 8 Faneuil Hall Square. 



Also in 



CHELSEA, FALL EIVEE and TAUNTON. 



OUR SPEC!ALT1ES. 

AMERICAN WATCHES, 
-^DIAMONDS,*- 

Sterling Silver Ware, French Clocks and Bronzes, Fine 
Plated Ware, Jewelry and Fancy Goods. 

Designs and Estimates for Class Rings, Pins and Badges furnished 
without charge. 

N. G. WOOD & SONS, 

467 WASHINGTON ST., BOSTON. 

LAWRENCE, WILDE & COT 

Manufacturers of First-Class 

FURNITURE 



AND 



INTERIOR DECORATIONS, 

Nos. 38 to 48 Cornhill - - Boston. 



A. Lawrence. 
Wm. H. Hull. 



Geo. B. Darrow. 
F. D. Wilde. 



EST A. B L I S HC E r> 1830. 



ALFRED MUDGE & SON, 

PRINTERS, 

No. 24 FRANKLIN STREET, BOSTON, MASS. 

HAVE UNSURPASSED FACILITIES FOR 

BOOK AND MISCELLANEOUS PRINTING, 

ELECTROTYPING AND STEREOTYPING, 

MERCANTILE AND COMMERCIAL PRINTING, 

FANCY BALL AND SOCIETY PRINTING. 



LAW WORK A SPECIALTY. 

A FULL LINE OF WEDDING STATIONERY ENGRAYED OR PRINTED. 

WEDDING OUTFITS executed in the finest manner at reasonable prices. 

Information regarding work in any department will at all times be promptly furnished, either 
personally or by correspondence. 

ALFRED MUDGE & SON, 24 FRANKLIN STREET. 



Lasell Leaves. 



COBB, ALDRICH & CO. 

WHOLESALE & RETAIL GROCERS, 



AND IMPORTERS AND REIAILEKS OF 



The Finest Garden Teas. 

WE ARE THE ONLY HOUSE WHO RETAIL THE VERY 

Finest Garden Formosa, Japan and English Breakfast Teas, at 70 cts. per lb. 

Choice Teas in the different grades, ranging in price from 35c. to 60c. per lb. 

Use the "Diamond" Mocha and Java, the very best Coffee in the world, 32c. 11)., 3 Ik for 95c. 

ALSO, THE LARGEST AND BEST ASSORTED STOCK OF 

Strictly First-class Staple aitf Fancy Groceries, Cannes Ms, Flour, Etc. 

to be found in New England. A handsome and convenient Catalogue of goods, with prices, issued 
monthly. Copies mailed to any address. 

Cobb, Aldrich & Co., 

722 to 732 Washington Street - BOSTON. 



T. E. MOSELEY & CO. 



DEALERS IN 



BOOTS, SHOES, RUBBERS, ETC. 

FOR LADIES, GENTLEMEN, BOYS, 
MISSES AND CHILDREN. 

A Large Assortment for 

YOUNG LHDIES. 



GYMNASIUM SHOES 

In Great Variety. 

ENGLISH LAST WALKING BOOTS, 

In CALF or GOAT, 
Are SENSIBLE, DURABLE, and REASONABLE in Price. 



T. E. MOSELEY & CO. 

469 Washington Street, 



BOSTON. 



GOOD THINGS MUSICAL FOR 1888, 1889. 

Whatever they are, the music to perform them, to understand 
them, to enjoy them, will be found iu the immense establishments of 

OLIiZER DITSON St CO., who have on band 

CONCERT SONGS, GOSPEL SONGS, SACRED SONGS, SCHOOL 
SONGS. SUNDAY SCHOOL SONGS, COMIC SONGS, COLLEGE 
SONGS, JUBILEE SONGS, POPULAR S"NGS, CHOIR AND CON- 
GREGATIONAL MUSIC, TONIC-SOL-FA MUSIC, CATHOLIC 
MUSIC, ANTHEMS AND CHORUSES, PART-SONGS AND 
GLEES, OPERA, ORATORIO AND CANTATA MUSIC, COLLEC- 
TIONS OF MUSIC FOR PIANO, ORGAN, AND ALL OTHER 
INSTRUMENTS, AND IN FACT EVERY KIND OF MUSIC 
THAT IS MADE, 

All this is in the shape of Sheet Music (3,000,000 pieces), Octavo 
Music (3,000 kinds), or of music collected in well-bound hooks (4,000 
kinds). Send for Lists, Catalogues. Descriptions and Advice. Any 
book mailed for retail price. 

SOME OF THE NEWEST BOOKS ARE: 
PIANO CLASSICS, CLASSICAL PIANIST, YOUNG PEOPLE'S 
CLASSICS, S' NG CLASSICS, Soprano | SONG CLASSICS, Alto 
and Bass ; CLASSIC TENOR SONGS, Each $1.00, Very select 
and good music, 

Send the price of any book and receive it by return mail. The con- 
venience of this arrangement is appreciated by thousands of ens 
tomers. 

O LIVER DITSON & CO., BOSTON. 
O. ~F\ EDDY <5g CO 

COAL. 

We furnish all the Coal used at " Lasell." 
C, F\ EDDY & CO. 

WEST NEWTON, MASS. 



JLasell Leaves. 



LADIES' FINE FOOTWEAR. 



NOVELTIES 



IN 



We have added for Spring and Summer, many new lines, in- 
cluding specialties of which we have exclusive control. 



MILLINERY 



* 

GYMNASIUM SHOES, 


RECEIVED DAILY from PARIS and LONDON. 


WEDDING AND PARTY 
BOOTS AND SLIPPERS. 


Ladies are invited to call and examine before purchasing 
elsewhere. Correct Styles. Popular prices. 






HENRY H. TUTTLE & CO. 

436 Washington Street, 
BOSTON. 


HENRY M. BURR & CO. 

490 Washington Street, 

BOSTON. 




^THE CLASSY. 






PHOTOGRAPHER 



Vixl-:» 



*|» 



For Lasell Seminary, 
-^■'88*- 



$yudio, ££ Winter Street, 



BOSTON. 



LASELL LEAVES. 



DUX FEMINA FACTI. 



Volume XIII. LASELL SEMINARY, AUBUpDALE, MASS,, OCTOBER, 1BBB. dumber 1, 



LASELL LEAVES. 



Published Monthly, during the School Year, 



Lasell Publishing Association 



LASELL SEMLNARY FOR YOUNG WOMEN, 
Auburndale, Mass. 

Editor-in- Ch icf. 
JOSEPHINE BOGART, '89 

Business Manager. 
MAUDE OLIVER '8q. 



Local Editor. 
GRACE SKINNER. 

Political Editor. 
MABEL CLEMENT, '91. 

Musical Editor. 
MARIE MOGER. 



Exchange Editor. 
WINIFRED B. EWING, '89. 

Scientific Editor. 
LUCY SARGEANT, '91. 

Art Editor. 
PRISCILLA PARMENTER. 



Subscription Agent. 
NANCY BOYCE, '91. 

TERMS, IN ADVANCI 

One Copy, one year (including postage) 
Single Numbers 



$1.00 
15 cts. 



ADVERTISING RATES. 




SPACE. 


3 MONTHS. 


6 MONTHS. 


9 MONTHS. 


I -1 2 column .... 
1-6 " .... 
1-4 " .... 
1-2 " .... 
3-4 " .... 
1 " .... 


#1.50 
3.00 
4.OO 
6.5O 
9.00 

I2.00 


#2.50 
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II.OO 
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I9.OO 


#3-5° 
7.00 
9.00 
15.00 
20.00 
25.00 



Press of Alfred Mndge &* Sou, 24 Franklin St., Boston. 



" Some are born great, some achieve greatness, 
and others have greatness thrust upon them." 
The unfortunates who compose the present board 
of editors, through some mysterious dispensation, 
find themselves in the last class. To the public, 
we make the best bow of which we are capable, 
never having attended a finishing school, and beg 
it to remember our tender years, and not be se- 
vere upon us. 

We, the new editor, expect to revel in printed 
expressions of our ideas upon all topics of current 
interest, and shall not lay down the office scissors, 
until we have freed our minds upon such impor- 
tant subjects as, tk Mrs. Cleveland's Bustle Re- 
form," and that entirely new topic, "The Tariff." 
When all these knotty points have been decided, 
we expect to be placed uppn the " retired list." 

The year has begun very pleasantly. There 
are, as usual, many new girls. We are glad to see 
them, and know we shall be firm friends before 
the year is over; still, as we look around the 
chapel, we miss the familiar faces of the old girls. 
'88 has left an aching void, which we of '89 are 
too modest to ever hope to fill. However, we 
have aspirations reaching forward to the time 
when '90 will be eulogizing us, and holding up 
our virtues to coming classes. 

By the way, where is the class of '90 ? Ever 
since last June we have been going about a la 
Diogenes, — with this modern improvement, that 
we carried a microscope, — trying to find more 
than one member. Can it be possible that " La- 
sell Seminary for Young Women, Auburndale, 
Mass.," will break its record, and allow June to 
slip by without a Commencement ? We cannot 
undei stand why more of the new girls do not 
enter the course ; many of them are prepared to 
enter the Junior year, but, for some reason known 
only to themselves, they prefer to join the great 
army of specials, and let one poor girl sustain all 



4 



Lasell Leaves. 



the honors of '90. Think what unanimous class 
meetings she, it, then will have ! no wrangling 
over class pins and receptions (?) and no anxiety 
concerning who shall be class officers. 

In putting forth this plea for 'go our motive is 
not altogether a disinterested one. We learned in 
political economy that " man is a lazy animal "; we 
"also have heard that man embraces woman," so 
we conclude that means us. and. accordingly, we 
fear that the usual attentions showered upon the 
Seniors at commencement by the Juniors will be 
wanting, and the "grave and reverends" must 
needs assist themselves. 

Later. — Since going to press we have learned 
that '90 now boasts three members. Let the 
good work go on. 



We are all new editors, and have not as yet 
discovered any common grievance through which 
we may become sociable. No choice bit of poetry 
has been published which could be taken for the 
subject of half a column of extravagant praise ; 
nor has there appeared any article especially 
obnoxious to all our beliefs in the denouncing of 
which we might expend our fiery eloquence and 
at the same time get into very serious quarrels 
with the college press. 

Therefore, the would-be journalist, after think- 
ing vainly, asks every one she meets in the halls 
for a subject upon which to discourse, and finally, 
in despair, decides to follow the example of the 
politicians. They, at any rate, are never at a loss 
for topics. If they possess neither celebrity nor 
grievance, they do not adopt anything so slow as 
the Micawber plan. What do they do ? Why, 
invent something, of course. For instance : make 
a " surplus " where there is none. 

But there is one never-failing resource, the 
stock in trade of the nervous young man, the 
vacuum-headed young woman, and the self-sat- 
isfied old one — the weather. The recent fit of 
sulks in which Dame Nature has been indulging 
has been most depressing, The tears which she 
has shed, together with the salty showers rendered 
by forlorn maidens on the occasions when some 
rash girl has wailed out a dismal ditty, supposed 
to be "Home, Sweet Home," have caused the 
atmosphere of Lasell to be decidedly damp. It 
is rumored that as a result of this most trying 



state of affairs, one girl has actually contracted 
chills and fever. 

Why, we 've been momentarily expecting to feel 
the house loosen from the rocky soil of Massa- 
chusetts, and go sailing off to some distant Ararat. 
Possessing nothing in the shape of a dove, even 
figuratively speaking, to send out on an exploring 
expedition, we might, in time, have been and may 
yet be in a perplexing position . But the laws of the 
weather " do not regard trifles " like small birds, 
and the down-pour continues, despite vehement 
protestations. Having indulged in her caprice, and 
been so chilly in her demeanor toward us, — we 've 
had three frosts, — we might reasonably expect 
Madam Nature to endeavor to propitiate us by 
opening her chest of "goodies" and giving us a 
few chestnuts. 

Ah, you begin to be interested ? Possibly you 
can sympathize with a young person who went off 
into the cold, damp, muddy woods and encoun- 
tered nothing but very stubborn green burrs. E. 
P. Roe may revel in the " Opening of a Chestnut 
Burr," but — we beg to differ. 

Have we kept you too long? You are tired. 
Oh, well, you have our stupidity to discuss, and 
so, having supplied you with that broad topic, we 
shall consider ourself as having conferred a ben- 
efit on the college press, and draw the curtain 
over our maiden meditations. 



We wonder if it would help the business mana- 
ger, as she goes her weary rounds with the same 
time-worn expression on her lips, " Do you wish 
to continue your advertisement in the Lasell 
Leaves?" if we should devote a little of our val- 
uable time and space to explaining one of the 
many objects of the Leaves ? " Charity begins 
at home " ; and we see here an opportunity to do 
a little philanthropic work. The profits from the 
paper go to assist needy girls in paying their tui- 
tion at this school ; the money is loaned them 
temporarily, and in most cases has already been 
repaid Eight or nine girls have been provided 
for in this way. At present there is nearly nine 
hundred dollars on hand, and it is the hope of 
the present business manager to swell the amount 
to over a thousand. The Leaves, like nearly all 
college journals, depends for a large part, in fact for 
more than half, of its support, upon the advertise- 



Lasell Leaves. 



5 



merits ; so you see, good patrons, that you are help- 
ing not only yourselves but others, by increasing 
your business through the agency of the Leaves. 

We have heard that the editorials are never 
read. This appeal may never meet the eyes of 
those for whom it is intended; but we hope that 
those who advertise will understand one of our 
aims in editing the paper, and so be more liberal 
in their advertisements. 

Imagine a man who has a good trade and 
is well patronized by the school in his business 
taking one twelfth of a column — "just out of 
courtesy to the young ladies, you know." Of 
course, the twelfths make the columns ; but it 
would save the manager considerable work in 
mental arithmetic, of which she is not fond, if 
larger spaces were taken. 

It has been suggested that the money be 
allowed to accumulate until it has reached the 
sum of five thousand dollars, and that with this a 
scholarship be founded. We throw this out 
merely by way of a hint, in the hope that some 
former pupil whose husband or father is a bloated 
bondholder will advance a part of the money 
needed ; a still better plan would be for each 
old girl, rich or poor, to subscribe for the Leaves, 
and also use her influence in getting her friends 
to advertise or subscribe. 



After reviewing the curriculum of our standard 
colleges, the average student wonders if one brain 
could grasp all the languages, sciences, arts, and 
" ologies " that exist. Vet probably with added 
civilization there will come advanced ideas, to be 
resolved into a new science, language, or art. 

There is much matter on the subject of phre- 
nology, which ought to form soon an advanced 
study for everybody. The men who have been 
most prominent in this work are Spurzheim and 
O. S. Fowler. 

Some of the laws of phrenology are estab- 
lished either by observation or the demonstrations 
of the craniologist. With due reference to these 
laws an observing person can determine the de- 
gree of development of his own mental faculties. 
Doubtless some are deficient in comparison with 
others. Knowing this, he should improve those 
faculties, in order to have a well-balanced brain. 



In young Hoffmann, " tone " is precociously de- 
veloped. Doubtless several other mental facul- 
ties are deficient, such as "form," "wit," or 
" acquisitiveness." 

A person having some knowledge of the laws 
of which phrenology treats can make it very use- 
ful in studying those with whom he has to deal. 

Then it is a never-failing source of pleasure 
and profit to notice others, ascertain their promi- 
nent qualities, and determine their character. 
Such a study can be pursued in a street car, 
on a railway train, anywhere. 

In choosing friends one can discover his likes 
and dislikes, not instinctively, but phrenologi- 
cally. There are people who have employed this 
means to a certain extent in choosing a partner 
for life. As a result, these same people are now 
living in connubial bliss and harmony. 

Phrenology has not as yet been formulated as 
a science, but fundamental laws do exist, of which 
some, at least, have been thoroughly tested. But 
when phrenology comes to be a study, it may be 
defined as " a science which treats of the laws 
regarding the relations existing between brain and 
mind," or l ' the art of knowing one's self " ; or it 
might be called " the natural language of the 
faculties." 



A number of changes have been made in the 
Faculty. Miss Farwell, formerly of Gannett Insti- 
tute, Boston, takes charge of the History of Art 
class, in connection with the studio work ; Mr. 
Rich, a graduate of Wesleyan University, takes 
Mr. Cassedy's place, and Miss Cutler, of Carleton 
College, Minn., has the English classes. Miss 
Shinn, a former teacher at the Allen School, in 
West Newton, teaches Latin and Greek, and Dr. 
Maude Kent, of Boston University, is the resident 
physician. Professor Bowne, of Boston Univer- 
sity, delivers three lectures weekly to the class 
in Logic. We think the school is to be congratu- 
lated upon having secured the services of so com- 
petent instructors. 

• • ■ 

TO THE OLD GIRLS. 

Will you do us the favor to notify us of any 
changes in residences of former pupils, that may 
come to your knowledge ? Lasell wishes to know 
where her daughters are. 



Lasell Leaves. 



WHAT TO AVOID. 

" A loud, weak, affected, whining, harsh, or shrill 
tone of voice. 

" Extravagances in conversation — such phrases 
as ' awfully this,' ' beastly that,' ' loads of time,' 
' don't you know,' ' hate ' for ' dislike,' etc. 

" Sudden exclamations of annoyance, surprise, 
and joy, often dangerously approaching to 'fe- 
male swearing ' ; as ' Bother ! ' ' Gracious ! ' ' How 

jolly ! ' 

" Yawning when listening to any one. 

" Talking on family matters, even to bosom 
friends. 

" Attempting any vocal or instrumental piece of 
music that you cannot execute with ease. 

" Crossing your letters. 

" Making a short, sharp nod with the head, in- 
tended to do duty as a bow. 

"what to cultivate. 

" An unaffected, low, distinct, silver-toned voice. 

" The art of pleasing those around you and 
seeming pleased with them and all they may do 
for you. 

"The charm of making little sacrifices quite 
naturally, as if of no account to yourself. 

" The habit of making allowances for the 
opinions, feelings, or prejudices of others. 

" An erect carriage ; that is, a sound body. 

" A good memory for faces, and facts connected 
with them, thus avoiding giving offence through 
not recognizing or bowing to people, or saying to 
them what had best been left unsaid. 

" The art of listening without impatience to 
prosy talkers, and smiling at the twice-told tale or 
joke." — Christian Union. 



There is no remedy for time misspent; 

No healing for the waste of idleness, 

Whose very languor is a punishment 

Heavier than active souls can feel or guess. 

O hours of indolence and discontent, 

Not now to be redeemed ! ye sting not less 

Because I know this span of life was lent 

For lofty duties, not for selfishness. 

Not to be whiled away in aimless dreams, 

But to improve ourselves, and serve mankind, 

Life and its choicest faculties were given. 

Man should be better than he seems, 

And shape his acts and discipline his mind, 

To walk adorning earth, with hope of heaven. 

Aubrey de Vere. 



A few days since a pamphlet fell into the 
hands of many of the Lasell girls. It was headed 
thus: "A Third Party Needed." Its chief 
arguments are as follows : — 

i . The two existing parties will do nothing to 
banish the evil of intemperance until forced to it 
by public opinion, such opinion to be aroused by 
a new party. 

2. History and analogy drawn from anti- 
slavery movement prophesy the success of this 
party. The Liberty party, organized in 1840, was 
enlarged by the " Barn Burners " in 1848, and 
assumed the name of Freesoilers. In 1854 or 
1855, according to Greeley, the "Whig party 
was dead " and the Whigs joined the Liberty 
party, and together they became the Republican. 

3. " The Temperance party has been in the 
wildernesss seventy- two years." A third party 
will lead them out into the promised land if good 
temperance men, hereafter, instead of choosing 
between two evils, will "vote the third party 
ticket for Prohibition." 

4. " The license law is a great curse." Sta- 
tistics show the evils of intemperance to be 
appalling. 

5. " The Republican party is dead." 

6. The Democratic party, by the cries of 
" Good Liquor," have now nearly all the liquor 
fraternity on their side. 

7. Were all the churches to come out against 
moderate drinking, a Prohibition President would 
be elected in 1888. 

There are two sides to every question, and, in 
spite of the sweeping statements of this pamphlet, 
many temperance people with honest convictions 
still remain in the other parties, more especially 
the Republican. In the above, the third and 
seventh arguments are mere assumptions and are 
far from logical. The fourth, all temperance ad- 
herents accept in whatever party they may be. In 
replying to the fifth, we would only refer the 
reader to the recent State elections. The sixth 
appears to favor the Republicans rather than the 
third party ; for a party which is deserted by 
nearly all the liquor fraternity can hardly be in 
sympathy with it. The first can be answered by 
the modern method of asking a question : " Is 
there need of a third party to ' force ' public 
opinion ? " It seems to the writer that, in these 



Lasell Leaves. 



7 



days of free speech and free press, public opinion 
expresses itself without the need of any outside 
pressure. The only remaining statement, then, 
is the second, by far the most convincing of all. 

As a parallel reading to this, we refer the reader 
to an able article, recently written by Daniel 
Dorchester, exposing the fallacies of the Third 
party. In this he elucidates by facts the forma- 
tion and growth of the Republican party. This 
party was not, as is commonly thought, the Liberty 
party grown to manhood, though it contained, 
as a small part of it, some of the Liberty 
party. The Republican was not an outgrowth 
of the Freesoil party, nor the Freesoil party an 
outgrowth of the Liberty party. The Liberty 
League during its comparatively short life was 
made up of the radical members of the Liberty 
party. The early Republicans were not reformers 
of but one idea, nor was their creed entire eman- 
cipation. It was not a new party that brought 
about that. The two articles must be thrown 
aside, for they have caused only confusion. 
What shall we think ? Is the success of the third 
party a foregone conclusion, and are we as tem- 
perance people justified in throwing our votes to 
the liquor party, in the hope that in a few years 
they will return to us unharmed and increased ? 

M. P. 

. * * 

A NEW BACK-LOG STUDY. 
Let us hope for a lekindlingof wood fires. 
Like Charles Dudley Warner, we long to sit be- 
fore an open fire and thaw out some of that 
painful calmness and indifference which seem 
to possess us in this age ; but we beg of you 
not to imagine that we have in mind a small 
aperture in which stand two puny andirons, 
and upon which rests lightly three, rarely four, 
artificial logs — logs of the same length, circum- 
ference, and weight, painted, and with gas burn- 
ing in them, to resemble a wood fire. This 
product of man's inventive genius seems blas- 
phemous, and to fail utterly in its purpose. 
The pale sickly light which it sheds must 
depress, rather than make happy and merry 
those within reach of its influence, and must 
engender insincerity and untruthfulness, rather 
than virtue. A cat would not lie down before 
it, and we doubt if a poodle would, without 



hard coaxing Surely such a contrivance as this 
can never fill the place of our dear old fire 
places, with their hallowed associations. 

The ideal fireplace is deep, and seems to grow 
deeper and deeper as we gaze into it. It is 
nearly three feet and a half wide between its 
jambs, and has a capacious hearthstone in front 
of it, where the bright, coals tumble down and 
rest without disturbance until cold and dead. 
Gigantic andirons stretch out their long arms, to 
receive and bear up the weight of the logs ; 
while on either side stand "tall shovel and 
tongs, like sentries mounted in brass," ready to 
render assistance when needed. Now the back- 
log falls into a great heap of live coals, and the 
foresticks settle into a steady radiance When 'tis 
twilight, — '' for daylight disenchants," — with the 
aid of an easy-chair and some interesting com- 
pany, or even alone, could not Morris have 
found here his earthly paradise ? 

The best wood for a back-log is hickory, a 
sturdy kind of wood, which is fragrant with the 
forest and sings away when it begins to burn. 
The elm, they say, holds fire well, but the birch 
gives the softest and most brilliant flame. 

One hates to see green wood burn ; it seems 
so loath to give up its life ; it hisses and foams, 
as if in agony, and the sap drops down like 
great tears. 

A person must be very thoughtless to say that 
fire is only for heat. That is one of its good 
properties, to be sure, but it has countless other 
attractions. How beautiful it is to look at ! 
There is no picture half so fascinating, so enter- 



taining. 



Like the landscape, it never looks twice the 
same. The crackling, snapping, and humming 
of the wood are not objectionable sounds, but 
rather give zest to conversation, and help drown 
the harsher sounds of cart and small boy out- 
side. To poke a wood fire is a harmless and 
most excellent way of giving vent to one's spleen ; 
the smoke acts as a conductor, and lets it es- 
cape out of the chimney. 

Nowhere is one's imagination so free as before 
an open fire. Is there any place so conducive to 
that delightful occupation, day-dreaming? Only 
allow your imagination to pilot you and you can 
travel anywhere in the world. You are not 



8 



Lasell Leaves. 



afflicted with sea-sickness, nor home-sickness, nor 
do you lose your temper. There is no luggage to 
look after, no changing of cars ; in fact, every in- 
convenience incident to travelling is done away 
with. Especially is this mode of travelling 
adapted to invalids, and those whose means are 
limited, and those who speak poor French. To 
the foi mer, because there is no strain upon the 
nervous system ; and to the latter, because there 
are no fees to be paid to guides or servants, and 
no French, either good or bad, necessary. Only 
try it ! Draw your chair in front of the blazing 
fire, and look steadily at the bright coals. There 
is Venice, with its golden streams winding in and 
out, and its gondolas filled with gayly-dressed rev- 
ellers. The sun shines straight against St. 
Peter's, making it look like pure gold set with 
precious stones. 

We now gaze with admiration and unspeakable 
joy at our long-dreamed-of castles in Spain. We 
came hither not by the " direct route through 
California, nor by the Northwest Passage," but 
via the old reliable " Fireplace " line. No wonder 
George William Curtis never came into possession 
of his great estates in Spain, when he only viewed 
them from his housetop at sunset ! But if he had 
only descended from his exalted position to the 
hearthstone in his own little parlor, the deeds 
would have been signed and awaiting him, and he 
could have taken possession immediately. One 
always feels a little cross at his wife Prue, and be- 
lieves that she had the deeds made out in her own 
name, without her husband's knowledge ; for, 
although she only smiled when he made mention 
of his castles in Spain, she invariably gazed into 
the fire while doing her mending in the evening. 

This " Fireplace " route was recommended by a 
friend (not Mrs. Curtis), and we nad no trouble 
whatever in reaching our castles. With what con- 
scious pride do we behold the lofty spires and 
battlements of our castles, as they flash against the 
horizon ! Truly they are even grander and more 
beautiful than our wildest dreams had pictured. 
Sublime mountains, deep valleys, and soft land- 
scapes are to be found in the grounds ; the 
murmur of fountains is wafted to our ears, the 
songs of birds as they flit in and out of the trees, 
and the ripple of water as it passes over pebbles. 
"The luminous golden atmosphere," which seems 



to pervade everything, brings us first a whiff of 
the jasmine flowers, then one of the orange, the cit- 
ron, the oleander, and the rose. As we approach 
nearer, the great gates open on noiseless hinges, 
and seem to bid us welcome to our new domain. 
There must be guests inside ; for we can hear 
their voices as we ascend the steps. Sure enough, 
there they are, and just the people we most de- 
sired to see. The Grand Duchess of Baden is in 
conversation with Miss Barton ; Aldrich, true to 
his favorite theory, is urging Hamlet to take Ju- 
liet for a stroll down by the lake, and Ophelia to 
accompany Romeo. Dr. Johnson and his friends 
are there, too ; Glaucus and Nydia, Dante and 
Beatrice • Poe, with the raven perched upon his 
shoulder ; Milton, with his daughters ; Tennyson 
and Oliver Goldsmith. 

When the fire blazes, and the snow is piled high 
against the windows, what beautiful visions float 
through our minds of the merry Christmas times ! 
We can almost hear the shouts and peals of laugh- 
ter from the children and the men as they hurry 
along home with the yule-log, and place it on the 
hearth of the wide chimney. 'Tis a venerable 
log, destined to crackle a welcome to all comers, 
and burn out old wrongs and heart-burnings. We 
see long rows of red-cheeked apples set to roast 
before the fire, and the ashes are strewn with p )p- 
ping chestnuts. Later, when all the games are 
over, when the kisses stolen under the mistletoe 
cease to resound through the house, when the let- 
ters have all been written and sent flying up the 
chimney to Santa Claus, and the little folks are 
tucked in bed, then it is that we see what is 
surely one of the loveliest sights in the world, the 
stockings ; some long, some short, all hung with 
such care along the sides of the chimney. What 
a world of expectations, hopes, joys, and possi- 
bilities they represent, as they hang there in the 
dim firelight, waiting for Santa Claus to come 
down and fill them ! It does, indeed, seem sad 
that this custom is dying out ; for certainly it gave 
children, and grown folks, too, more real pleasure 
than almost any other one thing in the world. 

Books are our best friends, after all, and come 
to our rescue when we are tired of everything else. 
They are never disappointing ; but we can turn to 
them always, confidently trusting them to meet 
our mood. They are suited to all moods and all 



Lasell Leaves. 



times. When the wind howls, "making night 
hideous," and the rain taps against the window- 
pane, and runs down the chimney, making the fire 
spit and sizzle, as it strikes the coals, — on such 
a night we are apt to feel in the humor for reading 
something weird and gloomy. Perhaps we shall 
select something from Poe ; " The Fall of the 
House of Usher " ; or, " The House and the 
Brain " would not be badly suited to such a time. 
But should some of our number object to dwelling 
upon this morbid strain, and wish for something 
pleasanter, we have only to glance over the pages 
of Hawthorne's "American Note Book," or his 
"Marble Faun," and the firelight becomes only 
intense sunshine ; we are transported into green 
pastures, fringed by great oaks, which unfurl their 
branches to the breezes, and afford grateful shade 
to the cattle. How delightful to go with Haw- 
thorne on one of his afternoon strolls through the 
woods, and up a trout brook ! How exquisitely 
and delicately does he describe every feature of 
the landscape ! So perfect is the picture, we can 
almost feel the warm breath of spring on our 
cheeks, smell the perfume of the flowers, and see 
the tender green leaves dance in the wind, — 
even though the thermometer may stand below 
zero. 

Our companion suggests that we have en- 
joyed our ramble with Hawthorne quite long 
enough, and must take up a little biography to- 
day. We hardly know which is the most fascinat- 
ing, — to study the flowers and listen to the mur- 
mur of brooks, or to study the lives of men. Let 
us put on a fresh log and take Boswell down 
from the shelf, and see what he has to tell us 
about Dr. Johnson. All of us must have great 
curiosity to find out what there was about John- 
son that fascinated Boswell soj and we would also 
like to know why it was that Johnson had such a 
propensity for collecting orange-peel. We do not 
care so much about the latter act itself, but we 
think that an understanding of it would explain 
the superstition, with which all the world is afflict- 
ed in some form or another. Sometimes it is the 
mania for stepping on cracks ; sometimes the pas- 
sion for counting the numbers containing seven ; 
and, again, it is the looking for four-leaved clovers. 

Or, if we tire of Johnson, some of Charlotte 
Bronte's dull, colorless life on those bleak, gray 



moors might contrast with the hright light of our 
wood fire. But the increasing warm weather 
warns us that our days around the open fire are 
drawing to a close for this season, that we must 
substitute the fields for the fireplace, and sun and 
breeze for the back-log. But we are hopeful, be- 
lieving that those who have not been indifferent to 
the lessons of the fireplace will not prove Peter 
Bells, nor fail to comprehend the mission of bird 
and breeze and flower. M. L. H. 



When is a man's real character most visible to 
other men ? Is it when he is conscious of being 
" the observed of all observers " ? Nay, not then ; 
for then he is on his guard, and is apt to conceal 
his real self. But when he thinks himself un- 
watched and unscrutinized, he acts out what is in 
him. His real character comes to the surface. 
And the silent, seemingly inattentive spectator of 
his deed often receives an impression of what the 
man really is. 



Every day brings to each of us opportunities 
which we may neglect or never notice. We have 
an oportunity of speaking in behalf of truth and 
justice, and we are silent. We decline to take our 
stand against public prejudice or public opinion. 
We are afraid of being opposed or ridiculed, or of 
being out of the fashion; and so we do nothing, 
when we ought to act, and the opportunity goes 
by. We are like the man who hid his pound in a 
napkin and buried it in the eanh, and said, "Lord, 
I was afraid ! " We are not like the woman who 
put her two mites into the treasury, and was prob- 
ably critcised by the by-standers for her very small 
donation. Yes, she may have been criticised by 
them; but, then, she was commended by Jesus, 
and has gone into the gospels of mankind as an 
example of right-doing. She did not lose her 
opportunity. Let us do what we can, and we shall 
not be followed into the other world by our lost 
opportunities bearing witness against us in the 
great day of account and retribution. Every day 
brings some opportunity. Ev.ry moment of con- 
science is an opportunity. And remember that we 
are never called to do anything more than is in 
our power. If we can say, " I have done what I 
could," that is enough. — James Freeman Clarke. 



IO 



Las ell Leaves. 



DEEP AFFLICTION, 

"At ten o'clock Aug. i, the death of Mamie 
Peck, daughter of Dr. and Mrs. W. F. Peck, 
occurred. The ailment was diphtheria, with which 
she was afflicted two weeks. It was thought last 
evening that she was improving, she seemed so 
much better. But she was very weak, and death 
was due to failure of heart action. Her death 
will cause sorrow in the hearts of the many friends 
of the distinguished father, who know how crush- 
ing the blow must be to the parents. Miss Mamie 
was a lovely young lady, just entering upon 
womanhood. She was a graduate of the high 
school class of '86, and was student after in La- 
sell Seminary, near Boston. She was talented, 
with a well-stored mind and graces of character 
which gave her the abiding friendship of all who 
came within her circle. The sorrow over her 
death is deep and extended in the city." 

From the Davenport, Iowa, Gazette, of Aug. i, 
we copy this sad intelligence for Mamie Peck's 
many Lasell friends. She will be remembered as 
a girl of rare promise, having a ready assimilative 
mind, the courage of her convictions, and tact in 
using them for good. In her home the loss is, 
on the earthly side, too deep for any poor words of 
ours, but we think of it with the deepest sympathy. 



In ber home in St. Louis, Mo., July 4, Emily 
Peabody Stewart, aged twenty-six years. 

To her numerous Lasell friends the above 
sorrowful announcement was a shock of painful 
surprise. This vivid life, so happy, so full of 
promise, suddenly gone into the great darkness? 
No, — that cannot be ! The rather comes Kaul- 
bach's wonderful idealization of the mother with 
the dead babe — all living and glorified, vanishing 
in the starry sky, the radiant, uplifted face shin- 
ing in its deep and solemn joy. 

Emily was married in April, 1887, to Mr. Alex- 
ander Stewart, and her life in her home in St. 
Louis had been " ideally lovely." Twin children 
were born July 2, 1888. One was taken, the other 
left. May He who permits so great a calamity for 
some ultimate good in the divine order, which we 
trust, but cannot see, give to these bereaved ones, 
according to his promise, exceeding grace ! 



Again has the angel come within our circle 
and claimed one of our beloved ones for the 
realms above. In July, the sad news was brought 
us from St. Louis that Emily Peabody Stewart 
had passed beyond the gates, leaving sadness and 
sorrow in the homes so recently brightened and 
made lovely by her presence and character, and 
sending grief into many a heart glad in her friend- 
ship. 

Emily's life at Lasell was especially happy in 
influence over her companions, and the cheerful, 
kindly girl with a welcome and pleasant word 
to every one will not be soon forgotten. Her 
influence will keep on in the coming years, 
as one whose presence lightened the cares of 
others. 

Her joyous life and temperament so directed 
her character that no selfish motive was allowed 
to let fall a shadow on her neighbor. Truly had 
she received, freely she gave. 

Well do we remember a slight discussion that 
arose in the class-room on the sincerity of meeting 
every one alike, when there might be a difference 
in feeling, and her reply to the effect that we 
owed, as fellow-crea'ures, a pleasant greeting to 
each other which no self-feeling should be per- 
mitted to mar. And there is not a Lasell ac- 
quaintance but will answer that Emily lived up to 
this friendly conviction. 

As a classmate we grieve for the one who was 
the life of the six who together reaped the bene- 
fits of Lasell, and together passed from school 
duties into the various callings of a woman's world. 
We cherish the memory of one whose principle 
was ever for the right, and whose Christian influ- 
ence was always uplifting. Her happy thought 
of giving the bridal bouquet to her grandmother 
when leaving her girlhood's home but expresses 
the ruling thought of her life, kind care of others, 
and reveals the secret of her many friendships. 
Keenly we mourn the loss of our beloved friend 
and mingle our sorrow with those who knew and 
loved her in the nearer, dearer ties of home. 
Favored and blessed in her friendship, we bow to 
the will of One who knows all sorrows and reads 
all hearts, and who can turn the grief of to-day 
into joy to come. '82. 



Lasell Leaves. 



1 1 



" C. L. L., In Memoriam," bring to the mem- 
bers of our Lasell European parties just trib- 
utes to the many virtues of Dr. Charles Loomis, 
"the noble, faithful, and affectionate son " of our 
friend and leader, Dr. L. C. Loomis, and his be- 
loved wife. He was their only child ; the loss is 
so irreparable to the hearts whose deepest joy 
and hope were in him that we know not how to 
speak to them. But all over this land those who 
have hid the comfort and rest of his care for 
them in travelling abroad will sympathize with 
Dr. and Mrs. Loomis, appreciating as friends the 
refined, accomplished young man, so soon gone 
from a life in which he seemed so necessary that 
we find it hard even to say, " The Lord had need 
of him." Our hearts follow him, feeling no need 
of change in him for God's other place, — among 
all loyal, faithful, patient souls of just men made 
perfect. 

Mrs. John M. Phillips died at her home in 
Brooklyn, N. Y., on Tuesday, Sept. 18. "A 
pure and lovable character, a lady fine and attrac- 
tive by birthright, and adorned with that added 
graciousness that comes from above," said one 
who knew her well. Ida's many Lasell friends 
would express deep sympathy in this great loss 
of the loving, honored mother. 



SUCCESS. 

The word means much, but it does not mean 
any more than was accomplished by those who 
went with the Lasell party to Europe this summer. 
To go through the whole programme of three 
months' time of almost daily travel, and to include 
nearly every important city, from Edinburgh to 
Naples, from London to Berlin and Vienna, 
without delay or accident, and everywhere "on 
time," with every one well and happy, is surely 
worthy the name of Success. 

The ocean trips were delightful, and with the 
splendid steamers, and perfect management of 
the Cunard Line, from Boston, how could they be 
otherwise ? 

To any who may be planning to go to Europe 
next season, the best wish we could make for you 
would be that you might have as complete a 
Success. W. T. S. 



MARRIED. 

The most important event in social circles in 
Edwardsville this season was the marriage of 
Miss Virginia Russell Prickett, of this city, and 
Mr. William A. Burrowes, of New York. The 
event took place in St. John's M. E. Church, 
which was beautifully decorated for the occasion. 
Promptly at the designated time the bridal party 
entered the church, to the strains of Lohengrin's 
Wedding March. The ushers were Messrs. Asa 
Pittman, Fred. Hawley, and E. I., Jule L., and 
H. E. Prickett. The bridesmaids were Misses 
Georgie Meyers, Bertha and Emma Oswald, 
Jessie Prickett, Grace Whitbeck, and Macie 
Prickett. After the bride came the groom and 
his best man, Mr. Daniel Russell of St. Louis. 
The ceremony was performed by Rev. J. B. 
Thompson. Upon the conclusion, the party were 
driven to Major Prickett's residence, where a 
reception was held from 12.30 to 2.30 p. m. A 
sumptuous repast was prepared by a St. Louis 
caterer, and Stcinkuehler's orchestra, concealed 
by banks of flowers, made the time short. 

The bride was attired in an imperial costume 
of white filmy crepe. The short-waisted effect 
was defined by a pearl girdle. The tulle veil was 
caught at the crown of the head with a diamond 
star, and fell to the foot of the court train. The 
only ornament worn was a superb necklace of 
diamonds and pearls, gift of the groom. 

The bridal pair will make New York their 
future home. — Edwardsville Intelligencer. 

Miss Prickett was a member of the class of 
'85, and a valuable member of the " S. D." 
society. Her many friends at Lasell wish her 
every happiness and a prosperous future. 

Constance Waite, at Lasell in '82, was mar- 
ried September 26, to Rev. F. T. Rouse, at her 
home in South Freeport, Me. A few friends were 
present, among them Grace Durfee, '85. Mr. and 
Mrs. Rouse will make their home in West Superior, 
Wis., where we wish them all joy and happiness. 

At 64 Burnet Street, Syracuse, N. Y., Sept 25, 
Miss Mabel Hill Bliss and Mr. Frederick Rowling 
Tibbitts. 

Oct. 10, at Highland Place, Pasadena, Cal., 
Miss Nellie Rees Hugus and Mr. Victor Bush 
Caldwell. At home after Nov. 1, in Omaha, Neb. 



12 



jLasell Leaves. 



IF WE HAD BUT A DAY. 

We should fill the hours with the sweetest things, 

If we had but a day ; 
We should drink alone at the purest springs 

In our upward way ; 
We should love with a lifetime's love in an hour, 

If the hours were few; 
We should rest not for dreams, but for fresher power 

To be and to do. 

We should guide our wayward or wearied wills 

By the clearest light ; 
. We should keep our eyes on the heavenly hills, 

[f they lay in sight ; 
We should trample the pride and the disconent 

Beneath our feet ; 
We should take whatever a good God sent 

With a trust complete. 

We should waste no moments in weak regret, 

If the day were but one; 
If what we remember and what we forget 

Went out with the sun, 
We should be from our clamorous selves set free 

To work or to pray, 
And to be what the Father would have us be, 

If we had but a day. 



Western Feet Growing Shorter and Wider 
— Says a shoe drummer : " For nearly a quarter 
of a century I have been in the selling trade for 
an Eastern house. During that time I have noticed 
a great many changes, but none has struck me 
more forcibly than the change in the shape of 
Western women's feet, which are growing wider 
and shorter all the time. Twenty years ago a C 
last was considered wide in this section, while now 
it is narrow for the general trade. The explana- 
tion is simple : The Western women for years 
have had a weakness for French heels and short 
shoes, which, it is known, have a widening and 
shortening tendency, and serve to produce en- 
largement of the joints and deformed feet." 



BIRTHS. 

Congratulations are extended to Mrs. Carlos 
Adams, ne'e Emma Cooper, on the arrival of a 
son. 

Born to Mr. and Mrs. Frank Seiberling, ne'e 
Gertrude Penfield, July 24, 1888, a son. 

Lasell friends congratulate Mrs. M. M. Jones 
— Georgie Hatch — on the arrival of a little 
girl. 



PERSONALS. 

Stella Toynton has returned from Europe, 
and is at her home, in Detroit. 

Lucie McBrier is at her home, in Erie, and is 
much missed by the old girls. 

Bess Harwood, Eula Lee, Grace Havens, 
Florence and Lizzie Freeman visited Maud Van 
Horn and Clara Bowen this summer. 

Miss Sinsabaugh, '87, spent the summer in 
Italy, but expects to return to Paris this fall. 
Her address is Post Restante. 

The engagement of the class of '84 is an- 
nounced. Leap year has fulfilled its mission. 

Daisy Parkhurst, whom we expected to be 
with us when school opened, is detained at Titus- 
ville, Fla., only one hundred miles from the fever 
districts 

Mabel Raum, who is now visiting in Evans- 
ville, Indiana, will continue a course of study at 
her home, in Washington, D. C., during the win- 
ter. 

Miss Rose Welt and Fannie Reed were the 
guests of Maud Matthews this summer. 

Annie Brown and Lena Tidd have gone West 
to travel for a month. 

Annie Bushnell expects to spend the winter 
in Florida. 

Lulie and Nannie Hogg spent their summer 
vacation in California. 

Lizzie Atwater expects to visit Anna Mitchell, 
'87, in October. 

Kit Youngs, Lizzie Peck, and Josephine Bo- 
gart visited Annie Gage at her home, in Paines- 
ville, this summer. 

Miss Mae Fowler entered the Woman's Medi- 
cal College of Philadelphia at the beginning of 
this college year, Oct. 6. Her family are living 
at 2032 N. 12th Street, in that city, having re- 
moved from Elizabeth, N. C , for the better edu- 
cational advantages for their children. So Mae 
can board at home through the medical course. 
We congratulate her on this beginning of prepa- 
ration for large usefulness. 



Lasell Leaves. 



13 



Sara Pew will be the guest of Jessie Law for 
a short time this fall. 

Among those who were disappointed in being 
too late for places in Lasell were two daughters 
of a Houston, Texas, family, who know the 
Morris and Hill families. They report " Bettie " 
as well and happy and giving vocal lessons with 
success. 

Inie Sanford spent the summer with her 
mother, at Mrs. Fisher's. Her mother enjoys 
Auburndale air so much that she hopes soon to 
become a resident. We shall be glad to have 
them near us. 

Grace Huntington passed a few days on her 
way home in June, at Albany, with our former 
pupil, Grace White, Mrs. Gould, who was in- 
terested in Lasell improvements, and promised to 
send a photograph of her little girl for the grand- 
children album. 

Bettie Aston sends a kind invitation to Lasell 
to visit her in her Virginia home. She would 
honor the reputation of the " Old Dominion " for 
hospitality. 

One of the "grandchildren" most sinceiely 
welcomed is Ella Marie Porter, the bright little 
reminder of our Ella Stocking, whose image grows 
no less distinct to our loving memory as days and 
years go by. 

In the early August Mr. Stilwell, the brother- 
in-law of our dear Julia Miller, and the delightful 
companion of our last ocean voyage, made us a 
little call, — too little. He promises to come 
again. Reports Julia's father and mother well. 

Miss Mary Coe looked in on us last week. 
Her family return here Oct. 1, but Mollie will 
spend the winter in her new house, at Southern 
Pines, N. C. 

It was very pleasant for Grace Durfee's old 
friends to see her again among us. A sense of 
duty at home led her to resign the work at Carl- 
ton College, Minn., in which she had made an 
excellent beginning. She accompanied a younger 
sister to Lasell, and is now visiting in Providence. 

Florence Baily, '87, is at present in St. 
Louis. 

Maude Oliver visited Lina Jones this sum- 
mer. 



Mr. and Mrs. Draper and Miss Hattie, friends 
of Miss Lillie Potter, gave us the pleasure of a 
visit recently. 

Misses Coburn and Pierce made a call at 
Lasell a few days ago. 

The home address of Miss Lillian Upton is 
287 Warren Street, Roxbury, her parents having 
changed their residence, formerly Blue Hill 
Avenue. We regret to hear that Mr. Upton has 
been ill since their return from the mountains. 

Mr. Rolfe is not expected until the latter part 
of October. He is at present in Rome. 

Mrs. Benjamin S. Brown — Susie French — 
visited her old home, in Manchester, N. H., dur- 
ing the summer, and came also to see Lasell. 
Her present home is at 1520 N. 27th Street, 
Omaha, Neb. 

Mrs. Elmer Warren Lewis, — Nellie Parker, 
— here in 1884, and Miss Martha L. Prentice, of 
Le Roy, N. Y., also here in '84, made a brief visit 
together here in August. 

Mr. and Mrs. Louis Hax, of St. Joseph, Mo., 
made us too brief a visit lately. Since the com- 
ing of Bertha and Emma, in 1881, the parents have 
seemed not only patrons but kind friends. 

Miss Lillian Mirick is in a responsible posi- 
tion at Wesley Water Cure, — P. O. address, 
Experiment Mills, Monroe County, Pa. After she 
had finished the course in Dr. Sargent's school at 
Cambridge he thought it advisable for her to do 
some lighter work than teaching gymnastics. 
She likes her present work, and writes " Remem- 
ber me to all my old friends if there are any still 
there." 

Mrs. Charles K. Stearns — Jennie Hays — 
of Williamsport, Pa., sends two beautiful photo- 
graphs — Rachel Hays, two and a half years, 
and Catherine, five months old 

Clara L. White and Lizzie B. Burnham, -'87, 
spent two weeks of July with Mamie Noyes, '87, 
and her mother, at Jefferson, N. H. 

Clara White also spent two weeks with Sallie 
Head at Hooksett, N. H. 

We see that Ex-Governor Long is again as- 
sociated with Alfred Hemenway, the legal firm 
being now Allen, Long & Hemenway. Mr. 
Hemenway has done his part toward making 



H 



Lasell Leaves. 



Lasellians law-abiding girls, albeit all the grapes 
and apples about Auburndale don't fall from 
" branches leaning over our wall ! " " Train up 
a child," etc., nevertheless, and when we are old 
we shall depart to Mr. Hemenway to wage our 
war with the husbands who repair to Buffalo and 
marry " unbeknownst." Nobody can surpass 
Mr. Hemenway in fastening on a bright button, 
to stick a girl's eyes to the law that she may be 
glad to remember by and by, not even that popu- 
lar but still unknown to Lasell girls, Governor 

Lo "g- _ 

LOCALS. 

Five hundred dollars a year — no recreation. 
Attention ! 

One Brown, no Smith, no Jones ! 
Many names have been given this year for the 
Symphony Concerts. 

What is the capital of Georgia ? 
Chicago Senior — Atlanta. 

An unheard-of thing has happened in the Senior 
class : every member is engaged. 

On Saturday evening, Sept. 22, the new girls 
were received in the Gymnasium by the teachers 
and Seniors, and were welcomed to Lasell by all 
the " old girls." Decorations of blue and white 
bunting, Chinese lanterns, and flags were very 
tastefully arranged by Mr. Shepherd, and gave to 
the Gymnasium a very attractive appearance. 
During the evening, Prof. Hills dedicated the 
new Sleinway grand, by rendering two fine selec- 
tions upon it, and the Auburndale Male Quartet 
sang some of their delightful songs. 

The Senior class numbers twelve. 

Minister : The contribution will now be taken 
up for all needy clergymen and their widows. 

New Girl. — How dreadfully the wind blows 
here. Does it blow all the time ? 

Old Girl. —Yes; but— (happy thought) it does 
not belong here, it comes from the northwest. 

Miss Cushman will be absent until Christmas, 
perhaps the entire year, as she chooses to rest from 
school work for a time. Miss Jennie Farwell, 
also in charge of the studio, ably fills Miss Cush- 
man's place in the History of Art class, 



Lasell girls believe in spelling as they pro- 
nounce, as shown in the Bible examination of one 
Sunday. 

Lazzarith 

Marke 

Jhon 

Joab 

Jobe 
Pentituke, also Pentetook. Jacob, by the way, 
was placed among the Disciples. 

Prof. B. (in chapet) . — Any one by the name of 
Rachel here ? 

Voice from a distance. — Yes. 

Prof. B. — Where ? 

Ans. — She has gone home. 

The S. D. reception given to the new girls in 
the Gymnasium, Sept. 29, was much enjoyed by 
all present. The S. D.'s showed charming taste 
in the decoration of the room, and a few members 
of the society favored their guests with music and 
elocution. 

Senior's conundrum. — Why is Cleveland like 
a tree ? 

Ans. — Because he leaves in the spring. 

Auction. — " Wives " went for two cents. 

Senior No. i. — What is a Cheshire cat ? 

Senior No. 2. — Why, don't you know? It was 
an animal that followed " Alice in Wonderland " 
about on her journeys. The one that vanished 
and re%>anished. 

All are much interested in the building of the 
new natatorium and bowling alley, which are still 
in an unfinished condition. 

The first regular meeting of the Lasell Y. W. 
C. T. U. was held Sunday, Sept. 23, at which an 
outline of the work of the Y.'s was given. Over 
forty were present, and the outlook for the coming 
year is very encouraging. 



NEW STUDENTS. 

Maud Baldwin, Hawaiian Islands ; Ida Bar- 
ton, Auburndale; Rosa Best, Whitinsville, 
Mass. ; Ruby Blaisdell, Chicopee Falls, Mass. ; 
Belle Bragdon, Auburndale; Annie Burr, Middle- 
town, Conn. ; Bertha Clapp, Des Moines, Iowa ; 
Alice Coe, Durham, N. H. ; Addie Commins, 



Lasell Leaves. 



15 



Akron, O.; Eva Couch, Round Pond, Me. ; Nellie 
Davis, Chicago, 111. ; Rena Day, Wakefield, Mass.- 
Florence Durfee, Marion, O. ; Maud Evans, 
Kansas City, Mo. ; Jennie and Mary Fairleigh, 
St. Joseph, Mo. ; Susan Flather, Nashua, N. H. ; 
Fanny Foster, Terre Haute, Ind. ; Flora Gardner, 
Chicago, 111. ; Emma Gass, Cambridge, Mass. ; 
Elva Gibson, Clarks, Neb.; Martha Hall, Bel- 
fast, Me. ; Adelaide Harding, Chicago, 111. ; Sara 
Harvey, Chicago, 111. ; Mary Heffelfinger, Min- 
neapolis, Minn. ; Sara Hitchcock, Bath, Me. ; 
Laura Hutton, Richmond, Ind. : Nellie John- 
son, Walla Walla, Washington Ter. ; Helen Ken- 
dall, Auburndale ; Lida Kidder, Orange, N. J. ; 
Alice Lane, Waltham, Mass. ; Margaret Leavitt, 
Cambridgeport, Mass. ; Mabel Lee, Detroit, 
Mich. ; Isabelle Lombard, Chicago, 111. ; Annie 
Merrill, Manchester, N. H. ; Margaret McChes- 
ney, Chicago, 111.; Helen Moore, N. Anson, Me. ; 
Gertrude Newcomb, Biddeford, Me. ; Mary Hinde, 
Oskaloosa, Iowa ; Etha Pearce, Baltimore, Md. ; 
Lida and Mary Peck, Wellington, Kan. ; Alice 
Pond, Dorchester, Mass. ; Gertrude Reynolds, 
E. Haddam, Conn. ; Nellie Richards, Roxbury, 
Mass. ; Lucy Roberts, Decatur, 111. ; Marcia Rob- 
inson, Mt. Vernon, Me. ; Lucie Sampson, Den- 
ver, Col. ; Harriet and Lois Sawyer, Napa City, 
Cal. ; Kittie and Mary Seiberling, Akron, Ohio ; 
Bessie Shepherd, Auburndale ; Daise' Shryock, 
Baltimore, Md. ; Helen Staples, Dubuque, Iowa; 
Rachel Stearns, Waltham, Mass.; Vermeille 
Swan, Lowell, Mass. ; Mabel Wanock, Urbana, 
Ohio ; Laura Whitney, Millbury, Mass. ; Lilian 
Whitney, Auburndale ; Maude Whitney, Mill- 
bury, Mass.; Mary Wilcox, Fort Keogh, Kan.; 
Bessie Williams, Muncie, Ind. ; Harriet Wilmarth, 
Attleboro, Mass. ; Annie Wilson, Boston, Mass. ; 
Nettie Woodbury, Beverly, Mass. ; Louise Wood- 
man, Fairfield, Me. ; Susie Young, Danielsonville, 
Conn. ; Jessie Benton, Brookline, Mass. ; Bessie 
Tole, Somerville, Mass. ; Theresa Hollander, 
Somerville, Mass. 



SCIENTIFIC NOTES. 

J. H. Debray, a most eminent and distin- 
guished chemist, died, at Paris, July 10, at the 
age of sixty-one. He is a great loss to the scien- 
tific world. 



Two rare fossils were found in Catskill, N. Y. 
One a large specimen of branching coral, with 
a stem one inch in diameter, pronounced a new 
species. 

Animals that live in desert places never drink ; 
and a kind of mouse has been obtained which for 
a year tasted no water or moist food. 

Two French chemists have succeeded in pro- 
ducing, by artificial means, rubies of considerable 
size, which, in all their chemical and physical 
characteristics, can hardly be distinguished from 
the natural. The effect this may have upon the 
gems remains to be seen, but if the production 
of crystals of considerable size is successful, rubies 
must necessarily lose their position as the most 
valuable gem. 

Amber is found in paying quantities only in 
the Baltic Sea. It was formerly obtained when 
storms occurred in the winter, when the sea was 
convulsed, and threw the amber upon the shore. 
Now it is brought up by divers in improved diving 
apparatus. 



POLITICAL NOTES. 

The Democrats are still engaged in trying to 
win the last election in Maine. 

Mr. Thurman has recently taken occasion to 
set forth his great love for the negro, and to show 
that the abolition of slavery was brought about by 
the Democratic party. 

The Republican party is the only one in the 
North that has made war on an element in its 
own ranks, viz., the saloonists. Almost every 
Republican State has, by stringent legislation, 
proved its hostility to the saloon - 

Political meetings at all points in Indiana, 
both Democratic and Republican, are being more 
largely attended than in any previous campaign. 
Crowds of 5,000, and even 10,000, assemble at 
little cross-road villages on two or three days' 
notice. 



MUSICAL NOTES. 

Patti has been severely criticised in South 
America. 



i6 



Las ell Leaves. 



Miss Gertrude Franklin has returned from 
London. 

" The Mikado " is to be given in San Francisco 
in the Japanese language. 

On Minnie Hauk as Carmen: — 

We hear with a musical pleasure untold 

The strains of sweet Carmen, wherein we rejoice ; 

What paradox forced you, sweet songstress, to hold 
The name of a hawk with a nightingale's voice ? 

Approaching deafness is said to have been the 
cause of Mme. Christine Nilsson's retirement. 

Teachers complain that the holiday season, 
from Thanksgiving to New- Year's, sadly inter- 
feres with their professional duties. Added to 
this regular interruption this year comes the Pres- 
idential election excitement. 

A Frenchman has invented a key which sim- 
plifies and renders lasting the tuning of stringed 
instruments. Every violinist should have one. It 
is extremely annoying to be obliged to listen to a 
man tuning his violin ten minutes in order to hear 
a five-minute solo. But it is probable that if a 
vio'inist's fiddle never got out of tune he could n't 
play a solo on it without first " tuning it up " 



ART NOTES. 

The new society of American etchers, whose 
object is the elevation of the etcher's art in this 
country, has elected Thomas Moran president, 
Frederick Diehman treasurer, and C. Y. Turner 
secretary. 

Few Boston artists have as yet returned to 
town ; most are still at their summer studios. 

A wing sixty feet square, connected with the 
main building by a hall, has been added to the 
Museum of Fine Arts in Boston. 

Mr. William Willard, who exhibited his ideal 
head " Hermione," two years ago, has recently 
shown two portraits, of Miss Alexander and Mrs. 
Hargrave, which are painted in profile against an 
effective golden-brown background. The types 
represented by the two subjects are entirely 
different. Both heads are superbly modelled, and 
are distinguished by the same exquisite coloring. 



EXCHANGES. 

Geeeting to all our exchanges ! 

We wish you a pleasant and prosperous year. 
May your editor's jokes be comprehensible, your 
business -manager's ways beguiling, your poeis' 
exertions not all consigned to the waste-basket, 
and your subscription list full ! Then your mission 
in life may be accomplished, and, the gods willing, 
that long-felt want may be supplied, — a success- 
ful paper. 

Some of the college journals have shown com- 
mendable enterprise in getting out their first num- 
ber so promptly. The paper which reached us 
first was the Yale Courant. The blue is always 
ahead. We sorrow with them over the loss of 
their fence. Alas ! poor fence ! We knew it we 1 
by hearsay. A fence of infinite strength, of most 
excellent situation. 

The Daily Crimson seems much improved. The 
mud so liberally showered upon this publication 
last year seems only to have proved a sort of var- 
nish to bring out good points in the paper. 

The Phillipian is a great success, — in an ad- 
vertising way. 

" My mind has never been mine own, since when 
For once on thy fair face I gazed ; for then 
I was transformed into another man." 

T. G. S. in Yale Courant. 

Plainly, here is another case of Dr. Jekyll and 
Mr. Hyde. 

ODE. 

( To Yale '92 upon viewing their composite photograph.) 

I. 

You're a darling class, any how, 
Though your collar 's a trifle high ; 

But the thing we cannot get over 
Is 
Your hypermetropic eye. 

II. 

We like your hair cut just so, 

Your mustache — ah ! we sigh ; 
But the thing which strikes us most 
Is 

Your hypermetropic eye. 

Iir. 

Your mouth is dainty and charming, 
Your ears are quite — well — fly, 

But the feature which pleases us most 
Is 
Your hypermetropic eye- 



Lasell Leaves. 



17 



K 



IV. 

We hope if we ever meet you, 
You '11 not coldly pass us by, 

Rut will give us one glance from 
Without 
Your hypermetropic eye. 



OVER THE THRESHOLD. 

Over the threshold there hang three balls, 

Glittering, bright, and beguiling, 
While below in the doorway stands 

An Hebrew so artful and smiling. 
The light burns dim in the store within ; 

Nobody sees him standing, 
Saying good by to his winter coat, 

For one half what he is demanding. 

Nobody, only those eyes of black, 

Twinkling and full of meaning, 
Gaze on the poorest cad in town, 

Over the counter leaning; 

FOR YOUNG WRITERS AND SPEAKERS. 
• DECKDE ••• OR + ORHTORY," 



PRICE, CLOTH, $1.00. 

A beautiful and substantial little book containing eleven orations wbich have 
been awarded the annual $100.00 Kirk prize at Northwestern University — the 
highest honor in the gift of the institution. Worth mat)!/ times its price to young 
writers and speakers. Shows what stv les of oratory are successful before mature 
judges. A study of these orations mail bring you prizes or honor in your own 
school. Address UNIVERSITY PRESS CO , Evanston, 111. 

J. N. LINDSAY & CO-, 

STERLING SILVER^ REED & BARTON'S PLATED WARE, 

Also, Plating, Gilding and Repairing. 

421 WASHINGTON ST., BOSTON. 



GEO. H. WHITFORD. 



HENRY T. HARTWELL. 



C. H. HOPKINS & CO. 



SCHOOL, 



CHURCH AND 

A3I OPERA 

SEATINGS. 

31 Milk St., Boston, Mass. 



Starved and busted, with downcast eye, 

You wonder why he lingers ; 
But after all the exchange is made, 

And some money clinks in his fingers. 

He snaps his fingers and looks about ; 

Suddenly growing bolder, 
He buys a spring coat with what he has left, 

To cover his shivering shoulder. 
There are questions asked, and a quick exchange, 

He 's fled, like a bird, from the doorway ; 
But over the threshold there hang three balls, 

Which help him financially alway. 

Williams Weekly. 



ACKNOWLEDGMENT. 
We have received from a friend of education, 
whose name is reserved, but who is a neighbor in 
Newton, twenty dollars for the "Lasell Leaves 
Fund." Such money cannot fail to do multiplied 
good, and to such men money ought to be mul- 
tiplied. 



YOUNG 



S HOTEL: 



EUROPEAN PLAN. 



OPPOSITE THE HEAD OF STATE STREET, BOSTON. 

Ladies' entrance, Court Street, near Washington Street. 

J. R. WHIPPLE, PROPRIETOR. 

McFAlRLZTST'S 

CHINA PARLOR, 

39 FRANKLIN STREET, BOSTON, 

SPECIALTIES IN 

pine China and Cut QIass. 

OPEN ON NOV. 1, 1888, 

A Full Lane of Novelties for* 
CHRISTMHS, 

TO NE)W YORK afifiSS" 
FLARES REDUCED. 
I ALL RIVER LINE. 

Express trains, connecting with steamer at Fall River in 80 minutes, 
leave Boston from Old Colony station week days at 6 P. M., Sundays at 7 
P. M. Due in New York at about 7.30. A. M. Connection to Brooklyn 
and Jersey City by Annex Boat. 

Steamers PILGRIM and BRISTOL in commission. Steam heat in 
staterooms. AN ORCHESTRA on each steamer throughout the year. 
Baggage checked from hotel or residence to destination. Returning, 
steamers leave New York daily, Sundays included. 

Tickets, staterooms, etc., secured at the line office, No. 3. Old State 
House, and at the Old Colony station. 
J. R. KENDRICK, GEO. L. CONNOR, 

General Manager. Gen'l Pass'r Agt. 

L. H. PALMER, Agt. 

3 Old State House. 




i8 



Las ell Leaves. 



Allen Solly & Co.'s High-class 
Hosiery and Underwear, in the natural 
gray lamb's wool, white merino, and the famous 
brown, all weights and sizes, 28 to 50 inches, at 
NOYEj IIros.' 

Blanket Wraps for the Nursery, the 
Bath, the Sick-room, or Steamer Travelling, 
for Men, Women, Children and the Baby, at 
Noybs Bros.' 

Morning and Evening Wedding 
Outfits, in Shirts, Collars, Cravats and 
Gloves, a specialty at Noyes Bros.' 

English Mackintosh Coats, for Ladies 
and Gentlemen, at Noybs Bros.' 

English Silk Umbrellas, in Gold, Silver 
and Natural Wood Handles, Ladies' and 
Men's, $2.75 to #35.00, very rare and choice 
designs, at Noyes Bros.' 

English Travelling Rugs, for Railway 
and Steamer Use, #3.75 to $5000, at Noyes 
Bros.' 

English Dressing Gowns, Study 
Coats, House Coats and Office Coats, 
and Long Wraps, $5.00 to $45.00, in stock 
or to measure, at Noyes Bros.' 

NOYES BROS., 

Hosiers, Glovers and Shirt Makers, 

Washington and Summer Streets, 

BOSTON, U. S. A. 




Blanket Wraps for the Nursery, for the 
Sick-room, for the Bath, for Steamer Travelling, 
for the Railway Cairiages, for Yachting, for Men, 
Women, Children and the Baby, at Noyes Bros.' 

Blanket Slippers for the Sick-room, the Bath 
or Dressing-room, for Men, Women and Children, 
at 75 cents per pair, at Noyes Bros.' 

English Holdalls, indispensable to Travellers, 
at Noyes Bros.' 

New English Neck Wear, Collars, Cuffs 
and Dress Shirts, in every possible style and quality, 
at Noyes Bros.' 

Ladies' Silk Umbrellas in Fancy Colored 
Stripes. Plaids and Large Figures; new, stylish and 
desirable, at Noyes Bros.' 

The last London production in Ladies' English 
Waterproofs are to be had at Noyes Bros.', 
$7.50 to #45.00 — just opened. 



DRESS SHIRTS 

For Weddings and Receptions. 

The present fashion of Shirts with Linen 
Cords, Embroidered Figures and Spot Bosoms, 
may be had of Noyes Bros., most thoroughly 
and elegantly made. 

We have a Special Department for Re- 
pairing Shirts, hosiery, Underwear, Gloves, or 
any article belonging to Gentlemen; can be 
laundered and re aired at short notice at 
Noyes Bros.' 

There are 81 offices in Boston who advertise 
Troy Laundry. Messrs. Noyes Bros. 
are the only house in Boston that actually 
send goods there. 

We send the work every day, and return in 
five days, and give new goods for any damaged. 

Special Laundry Department for 

Dress Shirts, Vests and Wash-Scarfs. Re- 
laundered equal to new goods at Noyes Bros.' 

Family Laundry Work called for and 
returned with no extra charge. 



NOYES BROS., 

Hosiers, Glovers and Shirt Makers, 

Washington and Summer Streets, 

BOSTON, MASS., U. S. A. 



ESTABLISHED 1817- 



JOHN H. PRAY, SONS & CO. 

Importers. Jobbers, Retailers and Manufacturers' Agents. 

Carpetings, Mattings, Oil Cloth, 

ORIENTAL RUGS, 

CARPETS AND UPHOLSTERY. 



558 and 560 "Washington St., 

30 to 34 Harrison Ave. Extension, 



BOSTON. 



113 Worth Street 



NKW YORK. 



Las ell Leaves. 



l 9 



A. STOWELL & CO. 

24 Winter Street, Boston. 



gorc\e of our Specialties : 

Bohemian Garnet Jewelry. 
Amber Beads and Ornaments. 
Tortoise-Shell Hair Pins. 
Choice Leather Goods. 
Oxidized Silver Jewelry. 
Fans for all occasions. 
Pearl Opera Glasses. 
Fine Gold Jewelry. 

"Wedding Presents in Clocks, Vases and 
Bronzes. 

LATEST NOVELTIES IN ALL DEPARTMENTS. 
Lowest Prices. 



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to 35 
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YOUNG LADIES' 

F/VSHIOfl^BlJ^ 5^0ES 



OF ALL KINDS. 



THAYER, MCNEIL & HODGKINS, 

47 Temple Place, Boston. 

ARTHUR P. SCHMIDT & CO. 

IMPCKTERS OF AND DEALERS IN 

FOREIGN AND AMERICAN 

Sheet Music. 

Sole Agents lor Litolffs celebrated Edition of 
Classical and Modern Music. 

13 AND 15 WEST ST., BOSTON. 

Catalogues sent free on application. 

BOSTON FOREIGN BOOK STORE, 

BOOKS IN ALL FOREIGN LANGUAGES. 

CARL. SCHOENHOF, 
144 Tremont Street - One Flight Up. 

HENRY W. GOODWIN. 

Union Cabinets 

AND 

Perfection Roll Toilet Paper, 

BRYANT & MAY'S PARLOR, WAX AND SAFETY MATCHES. 

114 MILK STREET, 

BOSTON - " MHSS, 

Prices furnished upon application. 

H. H. NEWELL, 

DEALER IN 

Boots, Shoes and Rubbers. 

Kepairing of all kinds Neatly and Promptly Done. 

POST OFFICE BUILDING - - AUBURN ST., 

BOSTON- 



ESTABLISHED IS-4-O. 



Isaac Locke & Company, 

Produce Commission Merchants, 

And Dealers in 

FOREIGN and DOMESTIC FRUITS 

97, 99 and 101 Faneuil Hall Market, and Basement 18 Sontn side, 

BOSTON - - - MASS. 

Z®- Telephone Connection. 



20 



Lasell Leaves. 



-x-WEBER'S-x- 

25, 27 TEMPLE PLACE BOSTON, 

J^NTD 33 "WEST STREET, 

Ladies' and Gents' Restaurant, 

Oysters and Salads a Specialty. 

OPEN AFTER THEATRES. 

Caterer for Wedding Breakfasts, Lunches, Dinner and Evening Parties 

and Receptions. Also, Club Suppers at Short Notice 

and Reasonable Prices. 

S. "W. BAILBT, 

DEALER IN 

WATCHES, JEWELRY, SILVERWARE, ETC. 

353 Washington St., Boston. (Up One Plight.) 

Jewelry Neatly Repaired. Also, Monograms on Coin Pieces. Personal 
Attention given to Repairing Fine Watches. 

ESTABLISHED 1847. 



AARON R. GAY & CO. 

No. 122 State Street, Boston 

STATIONERS 



•AND- 



BLANK BOOK MANUFACTURERS, 



First-Class Account Books of any desired 
pattern made to order. 

S. S. GAY. EDWIN W. GAY 

JUST WHAT HAS BEEN WANTED. 

A LADIES' LUNCH ROOM 

HAS BEEN OPENED AT 

23 AVON STREET, BOSTON. 

A quiet, neat place, where a nice Lunch can be had at a very reason- 
able price. All the ladies say, " Isn't it nice ?" 

T. D. COOK, Caterer. 

ALSO, 

Wedding and other Parties 

Served with the Choicest Viands, and by Competent Waiters. 

SUPERIOR ICE-CREAM 

DELIVERED AT REASONABLE PRICES. 



FURS. 



IMPORTANT SUGGESTION. 



Furs to be altered and repaired 
will receive prompt arid careful 
attention, with less expense, before 
cold weather crowds our furriers 
with work. Seals to be re-dyed 
should be sent to us at once. 

We are now receiving orders for 
our well-known superior seal gar- 
ments made to measure 

Our Sealskins this season de- 
serve special mention for quality 
and richness, never before sur- 
passed. Patrons who place their 
orders with us early v^ill appre- 
ciate this suggestion. 

Jos. J±. JACKSON, 

412 WASHINGTON ST., BOSTON. 
Established 1825. 

NATHAN NEAT & GO. 

MANUFACTURERS OF 







BASKET TRUNKS AND STEAMER CHAIRS. 
Stateroom and Light- Weight Trunks for European Travel. 



SEND FOR ILLUSTRATED CATALOGUE. 

^66 WASHINGTON ST., BOSTON, MASS. 

De Wolfe, Fiske & Co., 

BOOKSELLERS, 
361 AND 365 WASHINGTON STREET. 



ATnni Qlnrm \fn 9C4 ' All the New Popular and Standard Books at 
W6W OlOlB, llO, 001. Uowest prices, Gift Books, Bibles, Albums, etc. 

HlwW'IV Mn Q£? C I Bargains in cheap editions, Second-hand and 
AlOIIWd]) rlU. 000. \ paper-covered books, Juveniles, etc., etc. 

THE MOST COMPLETE BOOK-STORE IN BOSTON. 



Lasell Leaves. 



21 



Sieve, Crump k Low Co. 



4^2 WASHINGTON ST. 



W, H. FRENCH & CO. 

PLUMBERS, GAS FITTERS, 



■AND 



BOSTON. 



\j(/ atcKes, £[) i amends, 
fl ewelr ij, 
finest (Pottery. 



A Fine Assortment of Choicest Stationery. 
Invitations, Cards and Programmes. 



SANITARY ENGINEERS. 

JUDSON'S BUILDING, OPP. RAILROAD STATION, 
'WEST NEWTON. 



All Work Promptly Attended to and Warranted Satisfactory. 

j7w. CONROY & SON, 

flOUSE^SIGN POINTERS, 

WEST NEWTON, MASS. 



Chestnut St., near Depot. 

Residence, cor. Cherry and Derby Sts. 
glazier work a. specialty. 



THE "PEERLESS" FOUNTAIN PEN 




IS THE PERFECTION OF FOUNTAIN PENS. 

Is a hard rubber holder fitted with a 16 k. gold pen of the best manufacture, and will never wear out. It will write ten thousand words with one 
tilling of ink, and for taking lectures, etc., it is indispensable. There is no loss of time in dipping ink as with the ordinary pen, as the " Peerless " 
has a perfect, even and uninterrupted flow of ink, and is the best fountain pen manufactured. Price, $2.00. 

The Cross Stylographic Pen, Stylographic Ink. All styles of Stylographic, Fountain, and Gold Pens repaired. 



THE CROSS PEN CO., 306 Washington St. 



BOSTON, MASS. 



iTESIT moons. TO OXjT> sottth ohtjech. 



GEO. IE. 
12 Winter Street 



.A. I_i I_. IE 1ST 

■ - - - Boston. 



iNGS, BUTTONS, LACES, YARNS, CORSETS, 

AND FANCY QOODS. 



IT TT "pj T] "PCT r T l 

CARPENTER AND BUILDER, 

WEST NEWTON, MASS. 
Shop near R. R. Crossing. P. 0. Box 235. 




JOSEPH glLLOTT'S 
* STEEL V PEN8. 



THE FAVORITE NUMBERS, 303,404, 332,351, 170, 
AND HIS OTHER STYLES 

SOLD by ALL DEALERS throughout the WORLD. 




22 



Lasell Leaves. 



C. H. CODMAN & CO. 

Photographic Material, 

PICTURE and FRAME DEALERS' 

<A SUPPLIES > 
W hole sale and Retail Framing 

AMATEUR PHOTOGRAPHIC APPARATUS. 

34 BROMFIELD STREET, 
BOSTON - - - MASS. 

LIVERY, HACK, 



•AND' 



BOARDING STABLE. 

ESTABLISHED 1861. 

S. F. CATE, WEST NEWTON. 



Barge "City of Newton." 

Boat Sleigh "Snow Bird.^ 

HILL <£z Gr©-WEIT, 
(Successors to A. A. Kendall,) 

COMMISSION MERCHANTS and Dealers in 

FOREIGN AND DOMESTIC FRUITS AND PRODUCE, 

a. b. hill. Nos. 13 and 15 Merchants Row, BOSTON, c. s. gowen. 
HENRY MAIS, 

LyADI^S' HAIR DRESSER. 

Ladies' Hair Cut, Curled, and Shampooed in the most 
Artistic Manner. 

58 TEMPLE PLACE - - - BOSTON. 
FANCY GROCERIES A SPECIALTY- 



H. E. WOODBERRY, 

DEALER IN FINE GROCERIES, 

Cor. of Washington and Chestnut Sts,, West Newton, Mass. 

BRANCH AT AUBURNDALE. 

HRLL S COLE, 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 

FRIIITS'WVFGFTABIFS, 

100 and 102 Faneuil Hall Market, Boston. 



C. J. LITTLEFIELD, 

DEALER IN 

Fruits z*nd Produce, 

terms cash. No. 24 NORTH MARKET ST., BOSTON. 
13. M. OLIVER & CO., 

DEALERS IN 

PORK, LARD, HAMS, BACON, 

Sausages, Tripe, Dried Beef, Beef Tongues, Bolognas, etc. 
26 Faneuil Hall, or Quincy Market - - BOSTON. 



HARRISON SWAN. 



STEPHEN J. MOULTON. 



HARRISON SWAN & CO., 



DEALERS IN 



poultry apd U/ild Qa/ne. 

1 Faneuil Hall Market, 

BOSTON. 

TELEPHONE CONNECTION. 

MILLS &. DEERING, 



RECEIVERS AND DEALERS IN 



BUTTER, CHEESE pP EGGS, 

STALL 22, QUINCY MARKET, BOSTON. 
W. C. MILLS. E. F. DEERING. 

JOHN IP. SQUIRE & CO., 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

ABSOLUTELY PURE LARD. 

21, 23, and 25 Faneuil Hall Market, Boston, Mass, 

J. KNOWILKS & SONS, 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 

Fresh, Smoked and Pickled Fish, Oysters and Clams, 

Stalls 121 and 123 FANEUIL HALL MARKET. 

J. KNOWLES. R. H. KNOWLES. J. A. KNOVVLES. 

GEORGE E. RICHARDSON & CO., 

DEALERS IN 

Foreign and Domestio Fruits, Produce, Nuts, 

Cigars, Tohaoco, Eto. California Fruit a Specialty, 
No. 1 FANEUIL HALL SQUARE 
( Opposite South side of Faneuil Hall) . 
Geo. E. Richardson. Frank E. Richardson. 

SLAYTON <So BOYNTON, 
COMMISSION MERCHANTS 

FOR THESALEOFGENERAL PRODUCE 

19 BLACKSTONE STREET, BOSTON. 



J. C. F. SLAYTON. 



TELEPHONE NO. 1761. 



W. W. BOYNTON. 



SPECTACLES 

MADE TO 
ORDER AND 
REPAIRED. 

L. J. Mc INTIRE, OPTICIAN, 




NO. 357 WASHINGTON ST.. 



BOSTON. 



Lasell Leaves. 




MRS I flMftTRY !l Mb °" o?b ° t0 P a P h ' dframlif,w!lh ' h «'' EC M p 3E." s^-One 
l,luu ' L "''U 1 1\ 1 of her Picturm will he giteo e.3 a Souvenir yith eictl Outfit. 

Amateur Photography. Just the Thing for Country or Seaside. 

HORSMAN'S No. 3 ECLIPSE OUTFIT. 

PRICE $10.00 

Camera makes a 
Full Size CABI- 
NET l'HO'i O- 
GRAPH or view, 
eizr 4% by 6% in., 
and is provided 
with an attachment 
for making verti- 
cal or horizontal 
pictures. Jt con- 
sists of Polished 
Hardwood Camera 
■with Folding Bed, 
Double Plate 
Holder, Fine Brass 
Mounted Lens 
with set of Stops, 
Folding Tripod , 
Carrying Cane, 
Pr i n t i n g Frame, 
and Complete 
Chemicul Outfit. 

1 Specimen Pho- 
tograph made with 
No. 3 Outfit by 
mail on receipt 
of 10c. 

FOB sale by THOMAS HALL, 19 Bromfield Street, Boston, Mass. 

H. E. JOHNSON, D. D. S. 

DENTAL ROOMS, 

Office Hours, 8,30 a. m. to 5 p. m. 

ROBINSON'S BLOCK, WEST NEWTON, MASS. 

PICKERING & GILBERT, 

Commission Merchants and Jobbers in 

BUTTER, CHEESE, EGGS, ETC. 

Stall, 89 Quincy Market, Boston, 
f. a. pickering. james gilbert. 

ALFRED BRUSH, 
APOTHECARY, 

Plummer's Block, Cor. of Auburn and Lexington Sts. 

auburndale. 

'88. MISS H. A. SPROUT, '88. 

DRESSMAKER, 

AUBURN STREET, AUBURNDALE. 

EL.LIOT W. KEYES, 

APOTHECARY, 

Haskins' Block - - - Auburn Street, 
auburndale, mass. 

MRS. !_. COOK, 

Woodbine Street - - Auburndale. 
\y ^ p| lJ"T~/\ 

Dealer in PROVISIONS, 

Cor . Auburn and Lexington Streets. 

FARNUM &, COMPANY, 

PRODUCE COMMISSION MERCHANTS, 

Wholesale Dealers in Apples, Potatoes, Cranberries, Onions, Peas, 
Beans, Dried Apples, Oranges and Lemons. 

Nos. io8 and no Faneuil Hall Market - - BOSTON, 

Hbnry Farnum. W. W. Lawrence. 



FROST & ADAMS, 

Importers of, and Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 



ARTISTS' MAT 




decorative art novelties, art 
pottery, etc. 



Ebonized Panels. 

Winsor & Newton's Colors. 

German Colors. 

French Colors. 

Tucker & Green's Colors. 

Sketch Blocks. 

Plaques of all kinds. 

China Colors. 

Mirrors for Decorating. 

Artists' Boxes. 

Artists' Brushes. 

Artists' Canvas. 

Handbooks on Art. 

Studies of all kinds. 

Lustra Painting Materials. 



Water Colors. 

Bronzes. 

Brocades, 

Spangles. 

China for Decorating. 

Paper Panels. 

Tambourines. 

Repousse Materials. 

Canvas Stretched. 

Drawing Instruments. 

Plaque Rims. 

Artists' Easels. 

Drawing Paper. 

Materials for Tapestry, etc. 

Kensington Painting Materials 



Schools and Studonts Supplisd at Low Figures. 

37 CORNHILL, BOSTON. 

SEND FOR A CATALOGUE. 
F. S. FROST. H. A. LAWRENCE. 

Geo. E. Johnson, 

DEALER IN 

HAY, GRAIN AND FEED, 

Lexington Street, Auburndale. 



NEAR DEPOT. 



TELEPHONE 8150. 




CHARLES G. TINKHAM, 

Livery, Bad ifl Boali St 

Cor. of Lexington and Severn Sts., 
AUBURNDALE. 

JOHNSON & KEYES EXPRESS CO. 

GEO. E. JOHNSON, Prop. 

AUBURNDALE AND BOSTON. 

Office, Lexington St., Auburndale. Boston Office, 105 Arch St. and 

34 Court Sq. Boston Order Box, Bourne's Cellar, 13 F. H. Market. 

JIOTING TIANOS AND Ft'RNITUKE A SPECIALTY. 

ALBEBT IE 1 . •WI^IO-IST, 
Successor to H. E. FLEMING, 

■¥■ PHARMACIST,* 

Near City Hall, West Newton. 
TELEPHONE. 



OVEMBER, 1888 





ecc L e a v/e . 




VOLUME XIM.-N0. 2. 



CONTENTS 



Editorials 

To Subscribers 

A New-Fashioned Girl . 

Peculiarities of Women 

A Girl Should Learn . 

Old Oaken Bucket 

Origin and History of Lasell Leaves 

A Defence of Elizabeth. 



25 
27 
27 

27 
28 
28 
29 
,o 



Marriages 3 1 

Personals 3 2 

Locals 3 2 

Scientific Notes 34 

Political Notes 34 

Musical Notes 35 

Art Notes 35 

Exchanges 3^ 



Lasell Leaves. 



COBB, BATES & YERXA, 

IMPORTERS 



AND 



GROCERS. 



Twenty-dollar orders delivered free at any station 
within 50 miles of Boston, and fifty-dollar orders at 
any station in New England, at our regular retail prices. 



OUR SPECiALTIES. 

AMERICAN WATCHES, 
^BDIAMONDS,^ 

Sterling Silver 'Ware, French Clocks and Bronzes, Fine 
Plated Ware, Jewelry and Fancy Goods. 

Designs and Estimates for Class Rings, Pins and Badges furnished 
without charge. 



COBB, BITES k YERXA, 

680 to 692 Washington Street, 
3 Bowdoin Square, 

6 and 8 Faneuil Hall Square. 

Also in 

CHELSEA, FALL EIYEE and TAUNTON. 



N. G. WOOD & SONS, 

467 WASHINGTON ST., BOSTON. 

LAWRENCE, WILDE & CO. 

Manufacturers of First-Class 

FURNITURE 



AND 



INTERIOR DECORATIONS, 



Nos. 38 to 48 CornhiU 



Boston. 



A Lawrence. 
Wm. H. Hull. 



Geo. B. Darrow. 
F. D. Wilde. 



ESTABLISHED 1830. 



ALFRED MUDGE & SON, 

PRINTERS, 

No. 24 FRANKLIN STREET, BOSTON, MASS. 

HAVE UNSURPASSED FACILITIES FOR 

BOOK AND MISCELLANEOUS PRINTING, 

ELECTROTYPING AND STEREOTYPING, 

MERCANTILE AND COMMERCIAL PRINTING, 

FANCY BALL AND SOCIETY PRINTING. 



LAW WORK A SPECIALTY. 

A FULL LINE OF WEDDING STATIONERY ENGRAVED OR PRINTED. 

WEDDING OUTFITS executed in the finest manner at reasonable prices. 

Information regarding work in any department will at all times be promptly furnished, either 
personally or by correspondence. 

ALFRED MUDGE & SON, 24 FRANKLIN STREET. 



Lasell Leaves. 



23 



COBB, ALDRICH & CO. 

WHOLESALE # RETAIL GROCERS, 

AND IMPORTERS AND RETAILERS OF 

The Finest Garden Teas. 

WE ARE THE ONLY HOUSE WHO RETAIL THE VERY 

Finest Garden Formosa, Japan and English Breakfast Teas, at 70 cts. per lb. 

Choice Teas in the different grades, ranging in price from 35c. to 60c. per lb. 

Use the " Diamond " Mocha and Java, the very best Coffee in the world, 32c. lb., 3 lbs. for 95c. 

ALSO, THE LARGEST AND BEST ASSORTED STOCK OF 

Strictly First-class Staple aim Rmci Groceries, Ganwf Hoods, Flour, Etc. 

to be found in New England. A handsome and convenient Catalogue of goods, with prices, issued 
monthly. Copies mailed to any address. 

Cobb, Aldrich & Co., 

722 to 732 Washington Street - BOSTON. 



T. E. MOSELEY & CO. 



DEALERS IN 



, SHOES, RUBBERS, ETC. 



FOR LADIES, GENTLEMEN, BOYS, 
MISSES AND CHILDREN. 

A Large Assortment for 

YOUNG LHDIES. 



GYMNASIUM SHOES 

In Great Variety. 

ENGLISH LAST WALKING BOOTS, 

In CALF or GOAT, 
Are SENSIBLE, DURABLE, and REASONABLE in Price. 



T. E. MOSELEY & CO. 

469 Washington Street, 

BOSTON. 



GOOD THINGS MUSICAL FOR 1888, 1889. 

Whatever they are, the music to perform them, to -understand 
them, to enjoy them, will be found in the immense establishments of 

OLIiZER DITSON St CO., who have on hand 

CONCERT SONGS, GOSPEL SONGS, SACRED SONGS, SCHOOL 
SONGS. SUNDAY SCHOOL SONGS, COMIC SONGS, COLLEGE 
SONGS, JUBILEE SONGS, POPULAR SONGS, CHOIR AND CON- 
GREGATIONAL MUSIC, TONIC-SOL-PA MUSIC, CATHOLIC 
MUSIC, ANTHEMS AND CHORUSES, PART-SONGS AND 
GLEES, OPERA, ORATORIO AND CANTATA MUSIC, COLLEC- 
TIONS OP MUSIC FOR PIANO, ORGAN, AND ALL OTHER 
INSTRUMENTS, AND IN FACT EVERT KIND OF MUSIC 
THAT IS MADE, 

All this is in the shape of Sheet Music (3,000,000 pieces), Octavo 
Music (3,000 kinds), or of music collected in well-bound books (4,000 
kinds). Send for Lists, Catalogues, Descriptions and Advice. Any 
book mailed for retail price. 

SOME OF THE NEWEST BOOKS ARE: 

PIANO CLASSICS, CLASSICAL PIANIST, YOUNG PEOPLE'S 
CLASSICS, SONG CLASSICS, Soprano ; SONG CLASSICS, Alto 
and Bass j CLASSIC TENOR SONGS. Each $1.00, Very select 
and good music, 

Send the price of any book and receive it by return mail. The con- 
venience of this arrangement is appreciated by thousands of cus- 



tomers. 



OLIVER DITSON & CO., BOSTON. 



O IB 1 . lEIDIDY &c CO. 

COAL. 

We furnish all the Coal used at " Lasell.' 
C. F\ EDDY & CO. 

WEST NEWTON, MASS 



2 4 



Lasell Leaves. 



LADIES' FINE FOOTWEAR. 



We have added for Spring and Summer, many new lines, in- 
cluding specialties of which we have exclusive control. 



GYMNASIUM SHOES, 

WEDDING AND PARTY 
BOOTS AND SLIPPERS. 



HENRY H. TUTTLE & CO. 

43 B Washington Street, 
BOSTON. 



NOVELTIES 



IN 



MILLINERY 



RECEIVED DAILY from PARIS and LONDON. 



Ladies are invited to call and examine before purchasing 
elsewhere. Correct Styles. Popular -prices. 



HENRY M. BURR & CO. 



490 Washington Street, 



BOSTON. 




THE CLASSY 






PHOTOGRAPHER 



•i-r- 



For Lasell Seminary, 



Studio, ££ Winter $TR£Eyi\ 



BOSTON. 



LASELL LEAVES. 



DUX FEMINA FACTL 



Volume XIII, LASELL SEMINARY, AUBURNDALE, MASS,, NQVEpER, 1BBB, 



dumber 2. 



LASELL LEAVES. 



Published Monthly, during the School Year, 



Lasell Publishing Association 



LASELL SEMINARY FOR YOUNG WOMEN, 



Auburndale, Mass. 



Editor-in-Chief. 
JOSEPHINE BOGART, '89. 

Business Manager. 
MAUDE OLIVER *8q. 



Local Editor. 
GRACE SKINNER. 

Political Editor. 
MABEL, CLEMENT, '91. 

Musical Editor. 
MARIE MOGER. 



Exchange Editor. 
WINNIE B. EWING, '89. 

Scientific Editor. 
ADA MARSH. 

Art Editor. 
PRISCILLA PARMENTER. 



Subscription Agent. 
NANCY BOYCE, * 9 i. 



TERMS, IN ADVANCE. 

One Copy, one year (including postage) . . $1.00 
Single Numbers . . . . . 15 cts. 

ADVERTISING RATES. 



SPACE. 


3 MONTHS. 


6 MONTHS. 


9 MONTHS. 


I-I2 


column .... 


$1.50 


#2.50 


#3-5° 


I-b 




3.00 


5.00 


7.00 


1-4 




4.00 


6.5O 


9.00 


1-2 




6.50 


II.OO 


15.00 


3-4 




9.00 


I5.OO 


20.00 


1 




12.00 


I9.OO 


25.00 



Press of Alfred Madge &■ Son, 24 Franklin St., Boston. 



" All work and no play, makes Jack a dull 
boy," and why won't the same apply to Jack's 
sister? At present, she is thoroughly satiated 
with the number of study hours which she gets 
for five hundred doMars per annum, and, thus 
far, all her pleasure has been in anticipation. 
Fhst, it was the thought of logic, and how much 
good she would derive from it. She expected to 
be able at the end of two months " to harness a 
team with a logical chain"; but she reckoned 
without her host. The time has expired, and all 
she knows is, that " terriers are dogs ; but all dogs 
are not terriers." This fact she knew before. It 
has also dawned upon her that her mind is a 
vagary. With all this weighty matter resting upou 
the " vagary," with the earnest and searching 
perusal of sixty pages of Dowden's Shakespeare 
primer, and with the unusual amount of working 
hours, the Lasell young woman of '88 and "89 will 
soon be a shadow of her former plump self, and at 
Christmas will no longer tip the scales at one 
hundred and eighty-seven pounds. 

But, to lay aside all bantering, we think the 
working hours too long. The sound of the bell 
at half past four again would, indeed, be welcome. 
We think any girl who possesses an average in- 
tellect, and carefully plans her time, can accom- 
plish all that is required of her in less time than 
is now reserved for study; formerly we did it, and 
why can't we now ? The incoming student is either 
unusually stupid or unusually studious. We have 
no opportunity to be social or to make friends, and 
it is not to be wondered at if the new girls think 
us somewhat unapproachable ; the only time we 
have to speak a pleasant word to them is when we 
meet them as we pass to and from class-rooms. 

Monday mornings are taken up with cooking 
lectures; Sundays, with Bible talks, — even the 
luxury of talking at the water tank is denied us. 
We think our condition lamentable in the extreme. 



26 



If it is permitted us to take time by the forelock, 
we would like to put in a plea for next spring. 
From the present outlook, those of us who are new 
will never know the delights of boating on the 
Charles, getting fast on a rock, and possibly being 
rescued by a Newton High School — 

We were about to say something, when we were 
aroused by the sound of the fire-bell, and the 
rushing past of the two men, who live in Auburn- 
dale ; so we felt obliged to stop, and tender them 
the> usual Lasell inspection. 



The announcement of a new college publica- 
tion, to be called the Collegian, has lately reached 
us. It will be published under the auspices of 
the New England Intercollegiate Press Associa- 
tion, whose first convention was held last Feb- 
ruary ; but will be the organ not of that body, 
but of the American undergraduate. It will con- 
sist of prize stories, essays, and poems, with cor- 
respondence, eclectic, athletic, and rostrum depart- 
ments. The Collegian will resemble " Lippincott's " 
in size and general make-up; the subscription 
price is three dollars per annum ; the first number 
to be published in December, 1888, as the Janu- 
ary number. 

The object of the Collegian, " to introduce 
young talent to the world," is certainly very praise- 
worthy ; but two objections present themselves : 
first, the contributions are confined exclusively 
to young men's colleges ; second, the paper will 
be supported at the literary expense of the local 
college paper or papers. From the first, we infer 
that women's colleges are to be debarred from 
entering the lists, and that competition with their 
brothers will be denied them. If the Collegian is 
to be, as it states, a paper for the American under- 
graduate, why are women not included ? The 
second objection must be one of interest to the 
editors of the various college journals, as it en- 
croaches somewhat upon their rights. Any one 
who has had experience in the editing of a college 
paper, knows how hard it is to get the necessary 
contributions. Will not this be even more difficult 
than formerly, if the undergraduate sends his con- 
tributions to this new paper ? However, we wish 
them success, and shall watch this new venture 
with interest. 



Now that the election has come and gone, and 
the voice of the office-seeker will soon be. heard 
in the land, the feminine mind longs to make it- 
self heard. It knows nothing about politics, but 
it has a few ideas which it drags forth quadrennially 
and airs. After being aired they are returned to 
the left-hand pigeon-hole of the editorial escritoire. 
The office has been painted a beautiful sunset 
crimson, and the editors are contemplating a 
jubilee banquet at Young's which will rival that 
of the Home Market Club. Only one thing mars 
our pleasure : the mysterious disappearance of 
the office boy, who is a Democrat ; when last seen 
he wore a crape badge, and was taking to the 
woods, with his life in one hand and several pedan- 
tic Democratic editorials in the other. Any one 
seeing this eccentric young person need not return 
him, as no Democrats need apply at this office. 

Heretofore, we always believed in the tariff; 
but our faith has been rudely shaken, for during 
the last campaign it has not protected us from 
many interminable talks upon the subject of the 
Third party. Apropos of the Third party, we 
read in a pamphlet which was circulated by it this 
astounding statement, " The Republican party is 
dead." We are reminded of a speech made by 
C. Mitchell Depew at Buffalo, upon his return 
from Chicago : " They tell me I am bringing back 
a Presidential corpse; but it is the liveliest corpse 
you ever saw, and intends doing some effective 
work during the coming campaign." It seems to 
us that the Republican party is a still livelier 
corpse, and will do some effective work in the 
next four years, chopping off Democratic heads, 
and perpetuating the victory it has won. We 
were told, the other day, that American politics 
is very complex (a revelation to us), and that one 
who can see all around it cannot come to an easy 
decision, but that one who can fix his small mind 
upon one phase of it, for instance the Sackville 
letter, seizes upon it with avidity, just as the 
President did, and makes it all important. 

Having exhausted our stock of ideas, and the 
office boy not being here to replenish it, we will 
return them to the aforesaid pigeon-hole, to be 
revised in 1892 ; and close our harangue with 
these classic lines : — 

"Of all glad words of tongue or pen, 
The gladdest are these : We 've won our Ben." 



Lasell Leaves. 



27 



The " Regeneration of the Body," an essay 
edited in pamphlet form, by Annie Payson Call, 
presents to us clearly, concisely, and consciously 
the author's ideas and convictions on this subject. 

The regeneration of the body, she believes, is 
attained by a purely natural training of the human 
body, by which it shall come to possess no more 
tension in its muscles than a babe. The author 
depicts the degenerate human body utilizing, like 
the locomotive engine, only 19 per cent of the fuel 
which it consumes ; the remaining 81 per cent 
being, to all appearances, wasted. When more 
nervous force is created than is necessary for an 
action, then occurs robbery of vitality which is 
meant to furnish strength for other uses. 

The results which are claimed for this training 
of the body are, restoration of the body to its 
natural condition of ease, repose, and self-uncon- 
sciousness ; grace as a secondary result, since 
everything in nature is graceful ; and, finally, it 
stands to reason that if a person follows out this 
training, he will, by husbanding his physical and 
mental energies, add days to his life. 



TO SUBSCRIBERS. 

If any of the subscribers have failed to receive 
last month's Leaves, they will confer a favor by 
reporting the non-appearance of the same to this 
office. We also wish to reiterate what was said 
in the last number regarding subscriptions. Sub- 
scribers who are corresponding with former Labell 
girls would assist us by asking them to subscribe. 
We ask this of you, as we have no other means of 
reaching some of them. It would seem that this 
word of reminder would hardly be necessary, as 
we had supposed that all old girls felt enough in- 
terest in their Alma Mater to keep up with her 
advances and changes. 



The following books have been added to our 
library this year : — 

Douay Bible. 

"Daughters of America," by Phebe A. Hanaford. 

Maps of the United States, illustrating the 
Tenth Census. 

" English Dictionary," by Rev. James Stormouth. 

"Laboratory Manual of Chemistry," by R. P. 
Williams. 



"Introduction to Chemical Science," by R. P. 
Williams. 

"History of the United States, with Study of 
the Constitution," by W. W. Rupert. 

"Europe in Storm and Calm," by Edward King. 

"A Decade of Oratory at Northwestern Uni- 
versity." 

New edition of Webster's Unabridged Dic- 
tionary. 

»-•-» 

A NEW-FASHIONED GIRL. 

She'cI a great and varied knowledge, picked up 
at a female college, of quadratics, hydrostatics, and 
pneumatics very vast. 

She was stuffed with erudition as you stuff a 
leather cushion, all the ologies of the col'eges and 
the knowledges of the past. 

She had studied the old lexicons of Peruvians 
and Mexicans, their theology, anthropology, and 
geology o'er and o'er. 

She knew all the forrm and features of the 
prehistoric creatures — ichthyosaurus, plesio- 
saurus, megalosaurus, and many more 

She'd describe the ancient Tuscans, and the 
Basques and Etruscans, their griddles an 1 their 
kettles, and the victuals that they gnawed. 

She 'd discuss the learned charmer, the theology 
of Brahma, and the scandals of the Vandals, and 
the sandals that they trod. 

She knew all the mighty giants and the master 
minds of science, all the learning that was turning 
in the burning mind of man. 

But she couldn't prepare a dinner for a gaunt 
and hungry sinner, or get up a decent supper for 
her poor voracious papa, for she never was con- 
structed on the old domestic plan. 



PECULIARITIES OF WOMEN. 

This is what a few French experts have to say 
about women : — 

Women never weep more bitterly than when 
they weep with spite. — A. Ricard. 

When women cannot be revenged they do as 
children do — they cry. — Cardan. 

Woman is a flower that exhales her perfume 
only in the shade. — Lamennais. 

Take the first advice of a woman ; under no 
circumstances the second. — Pkoverb. 



28 



Lasell Leaves. 



Women are too imaginative and too sensitive 
to have much logic. — Mme. du Deffand. 

A lady and her maid acting in accord will out- 
wit a dozen devils. — Old Proverb. 

Women are extremists — they are either better 
or worse than men. — La Bruyere. 

There is no torture that a woman would not 
suffer to enhance her beauty. — Montaigne. 

Woman is a charming creature, who changes 
her heart as easily as her gloves. — Balzac. 

Women distrust men too much in general and 
not enough in particular. — Commerson. 

Women are constantly the dupes or the victims 
of their extreme sensitiveness. — Balzac. 

A woman forgives everything but the fact that 
you do not covet her. — A. de Musset. 

O woman ! it is thou that causest the tem- 
pests that agitate mankind. — J. J. Rousseau. 



A GIRL SHOULD LEARN 
To sew. 
To cook. 
To mend. 
To be gentle. 
To value time. 
To dress neatly. 
To keep a secret. 
To be self-reliant. 
To avoid idleness. 
To mind the baby. 
To darn stockings. 
To respect old age. 
To make good bread. 
To keep a house tidy. 
To control her temper. 
To be above gossiping. 
To make a home happy. 
To take care of the sick. 
To humor a cross old man. 
To marry a man for his worth. 
To be a helpmate to a husband. 
To take plenty of active exercise. 
To see a mouse without screaming. 
To read some books besides novels. 
To be light-hearted and fleet-footed. 
To wear shoes that won't cramp the feet. 
To be a womanly woman under all circum- 
stances. — Golden Censet\ 



There is a pleasure in the pathless woods, 

There is a rapture on the lonely shore, 

There is society, where none intrudes, 

By the deep sea, and music in its roar : 

I love not Man the less, but Nature more. 

From these our interviews, in which I steal 

From all I may be, or have been before, 

To mingle with the universe and feel 

What I can ne'er express, yet cannot all conceal. 

Childe Harold. 



"THE OLD OAKEN BUCKET." 

Three hours distant from Boston via the Old 
Colony road is Greenbush, a New England coast 
village whose beauty of natural scenery alone is 
worthy of attention. It is a central point from 
which an impressive, panoramic view of ocean 
and land can be obtained. But it is more inter- 
esting for literary attraction. 

Three miles in the country lived, in his early 
life, the distinguished orator, Daniel Webster ; 
and the village is especially renowned for the boy- 
hood associations of Samuel Woodworth, the 
author of the " Old Oaken Bucket," a poem in 
which he has so tenderly recalled the " scenes of 
his childhood." He was an American author and 
editor, born in Scituate, Mass., Jan. 13, 1785 ; he 
died in New York, Dec. 9, 1842. His productions 
were a -number of dramatic pieces, songs, and 
miscellaneous poems ; but none have obtained so 
wide a popularity as the "Old Oaken Bucket," 
upon which principally rests his reputation. The 
places referred to in his poem, and their surround- 
ings, are decidedly rural and picturesque. " The 
bridge and the rock where the cataract fell," the 
pond, the old mill, are still to be seen, with no 
changes except the decline of age. The cot on 
his father's plantation has been rebuilt, and is now 
occupied by relatives of the author. Visitors are 
requested to leave their names in the family regis- 
ter, and are shown a volume of his choice poems, 
his photograph, and other souvenirs. The famous 
well is situated between the house and a stone 
wall, covered with vines, that incloses the premises, 
ft has a small, open, box covering, and the bucket 
is attached by means of a chain to the small end 
of the long pivoted pole. The original bucket 
has long since been destroyed, but was replaced 
by a party from Cambridge, Mass. The following 
inscription is cut on it : — 



Lasell Leaves. 



29 



" The Old Oaken Bucket. 

1817 
T. R. T.~) 

H. L. B. > July 13, 1885." 
G. T. D. ) 

The poem is by far the best of his numerous 
lyrics, and will ever hold its place among the 
choice songs of our country. 

The following words are extracts from the 
poem : — 

THE OLD OAKEN BUCKET. 

How dear to this heart are the scenes of my childhood, 

When fond recollections present them to view ; 
The orchard, the meadow, the deep tangled wildwood, 

And every loved spot which my infancy knew ; 
The wide spreading pond, and the mill that stood by it, 

The bridge and the rock where the cataract fell ; 
The cot of my father, the dairy-house nigh it, 

And e'en the rude bucket which hung in the well. 
And now far removed from the loved situation, 

The tear of regret will intrusively swell, 
As fancy reverts to my father's plantation, 

And sighs forthe bucket which hangs in the well, — 
The old oaken bucket, the iron-bound bucket, 

The moss-covered bucket which hangs in the well 



ORIGIN AND HISTORY OF LASELL LEAVES. 

To those who are not familiar with the early 
history of the Leaves, the following facts, gleaned 
from former numbers of the paper, will, doubtless, 
be of interest : — 

"In 1867 there flourished at Lasell a literary 
society, — the worthy mother of the ' S. D.' and 
the 'Lasellia,' — whose members had assumed 
the unpretending name of the 'Novices.' Among 
other things, they established a paper, for their 
amusement and profit, which was read at their 
fortnightly meetings." 

The first number of this paper, bearing the 
name Lasell Leaves,' appeared Nov. 7, 1867. 
" On the first page, beneath a cross bearing the 
mysterious letters ' U. I. A. M.,' the secret motto 
of the 'Novices,' we read the words 'Lasell 
Leaves, a journal of literature, fun, and improve- 
ment, Auburndale, Mass., edited by L. McCreary, 
A. Davis, A. Cuyler.' Next comes the leading 
editorial, promising contributions for the new ven- 
ture from several widely known pens; after which 
follow various extracts, an ardent temperance 
article, and a n'sum/ of the political news of the 
day. Our little paper endeavored to be witty, 



also ; with what success, we leave the reader to 
judge, contenting ourselves with giving a few ex- 
amples, in which the unlucky Harvard student 
comes in for a gently satirical manner of treat- 
ment, in some syllogisms that we commend to the 
careful study of the present logic class. 

" ' Why is a Harvard student a goose ? A goose 
is a biped ; a Harvard student is a biped ; there- 
fore a Harvard student is a goose.' ' Why is 
Harvard College not an institution of learning? 
Lasell Seminary is an institution of learning ; 
Harvard College is not Lasell Seminary ; there- 
fore, Harvard College is not an institution of 
learning.' Apparently, Harvard students and 
Lasell girls have not changed much, in spite of 
the years given them since then in which to grow 
wiser. We find, moreover, interesting bits of 
local news, and, finally, there is a long 'account of a 
fine entertainment given by the ' Novices.' 

" But changes came ; a new principal took charge 
of the school ; the ' Novice ' society was succeeded 
by the ' S. D.,' and the little paper was for- 
gotten ; to reappear, however, in 1875, in a new 
form, fresh for a stronger and bolder flight. 
The pupils and teachers used to meet on al- 
ternate Saturday evenings, to spend a few hours 
pleasantly together. There were games, music, 
and conversation, and the thought occurred to our 
principal that it would give interest and variety if 
the girls would commit some of their thoughts to 
paper and read them aloud. The plan found 
favor ; an editor and three assistants were ap- 
pointed, to collect and arrange the contributions, 
and on the evening of Nov. 20, 1875, the first 
number of the paper was produced and read to an 
interested circle." The paper bore the name 
Lasell Leaves, and at that time it was not known 
that the name had been used before ; but after a 
time these new journalists learned the history of 
the " Novices," and were forced to give to them the 
honor of originating the paper. The paper pre- 
sented on Nov. 20, 1875,- is thus described: "It 
has a cover of white cardboard, prettily adorned 
with a design of oak leaves and acorns, and the 
motto ' Dux Femina Facti' '; violet ribbons tie it 
together, but, alas ! time has faded them sadly. 
Within are eighteen pages of foolscap, on which 
are inscribed, with evident care and pride, the 
witticisms, poetry, conundrums, and essays fur- 



3° 



Lasell Leaves. 



nished by the young aspirants for literary fame. 
The new undertaking was approved by all, and 
during the whole year the Leaves contributed 
amusement and interest to the sociables. The 
next fall, when the girls returned, ready for another 
year's work, Prof. Bragdon offered to have the 
paper printed for them, with the thought of en 
couraging them to bestow more care on their 
writing. The offer was accepted with pleasure, 
and the first printed number appeared in Novem- 
ber, 1876, much to the delight of the girls, who 
felt that their paper had suddenly become some- 
thing of considerable consequence." This first 
number contained but four pages, but the little 
paper was soon enlarged to eight, and afterward 
to twelve pages. "The first number for 1877 
contained a sufficient number of advertisements 
to pay the expenses of printing. A Publishing 
Association was organized, the number of copies 
printed was largely increased, and the paper en- 
tered at that time upon a prosperous career, which, 
we hope, may long continue." 



A PATENT LOCK. 

'TWAS at a regatta ball they met — 
The name of the place I quite forget — 
He, one of Yale's victorious crew, 
She, in a dress of crimson hue, 
-Both skilled in Terpischore's art. 

At parting he gave her his boutonniire, 
Which she fastened into her dress with care. 
The pin she used was a golden key, 
And the question he asked was, naturally, 
" Is that the key of your heart? " 

She smiled, and shook her pretty head : 
" No; that 's the key of his heart," she said. 
Then glancing up in a saucy way, 
"And it fits no Yale lock, let me say, 
Tho' your crew is so smart." 

Advocate. 



A DEFENCE OF ELIZABETH. 

Those who admire the beauty and the genius 
of Mary, Queen of Scots, cannot but look with 
horror at the dark pages of her history. Although 
the most beautiful, she was the weakest of women ; 
she raised around her, by her irresistible fascina- 
tions, a whirlwind of love, ambition, and jealousy, 
in which her lovers, each in his turn, became the 
motive, the instrument, and the victim of a crime. 



Like the Greek Helen, she left the arms of a 
murdered husband for those of his murderer. 

In Elizabeth, we find a stout heart, dauntless 
courage, and amazing self-confidence ; combined 
with these, she had a moderate degree of politic 
caution and wisdom, and early hardships had 
taught her prudence. Her aim was to preserve 
her throne, to keep England out of war, and to 
restore civil and religious order. Enthusiasm or 
panic never swayed her cold and critical intellect 
either to exaggerate or to underestimate her risl s 
or her powers. Elizabeth caused Mary to be 
beheaded ! Was she justifiable in so doing ? 
I answer, yes. 

The Casket Letters, a celebrated collection of 
documents, were the supposed correspondence be- 
tween Bothwell and Mary. In some of these 
letters is found the charge that she was an ac- 
complice in Darnley's murder. These letters, 
laid before the Scotch Council Government and 
Scotch Parliament, adjudged the charge proved, 
December, 1567. They were produced again 
before the English Commissioners at Westmin- 
ster, compared with some other writings of the 
queen's, and accepted as genuine, October, 1568. 
These letters are accepted by the foreign writers 
Rauke, Paule, and Gardike. Robertson and 
Froude also agree in the opinion that Mary was 
responsible for the death of Darnley. Without 
granting to Mary's correspondence with Bothwell, 
be it real or apocryphal, more historical authority 
than it deserves, it is undeniable that a corre- 
spondence did exist between the queen and her 
seducer, and that if she did not write what is 
contained in those letters (which are not written 
by her own hand, and the authenticity of which 
is consequently suspected), still she acted in all 
the preliminaries of the tragedy in such a man- 
ner as to leave no doubt of her participation in 
laying the snare into which the unfortunate and 
amorous Darnley was inveigled. 

In letters written at Glasgow by the queen 
to Bothwell, she breathes insensate love for her 
favorite, and implacable aversion for her hus- 
band. They inform Bothwell, day by day, of the 
state of Darnley's health, of his supplications to 
be received by the queen as a king and as a 
husband, of the progress which her blandish- 
ments make in the confidence of the young king, 



Lasell Leaves. 



3i 



whose hopes she now nursed, of his wish even 
of death, provided she would restore to him her 
heart and his connubial rights. Granting that she 
had no love for her husband, was it right for he r 
to pretend to him that she had, and to confess 
her aversion for him to a stranger ? She not only 
screened Bothwell from a fair trial, but she even 
married him in May, 1587. 

If Mary had succeeded Elizabeth, Catholicism 
would have taken the lead, and Protestant Eng- 
land would have been no more. If Mary had 
become queen of England, she would have de- 
stroyed all that was dear to the English heart, — 
the glorious Reformation, effected by so many 
labors and sacrifices ; for she had promised the 
pope, should she become queen, to deliver Eng- 
land into his hands, and to marry the son of 
Philip II., king of Spain ; and thus Spain would 
get a foothold in England, a thing which Philip 
had tried to accomplish, but in which he had 
failed. The pope, Spain, and the Catholics were 
working hard, through Mary, to do away with 
Protestant England. If she had succeeded, where 
would we have been to-day, we who boast of 
our freedom ? 

After the flight of Mary to England, for Eliza- 
beth to receive her with honor would imply an 
amnesty to the murderess of Darnley, and an 
approbation of the marriage with Bothwell, and 
would restore her to the throne of Scotland. 
From the first days of her stay in England, while 
caressing Elizabeth with one hand, Mary wove 
with the other, and with strangers as well as 
with her own subjects, that net in which she was 
caught at last. Her whole life during her captivity 
was one long conspiracy. We find her conspiring 
with the Earl of Norfolk to get possession of Eng- 
land in the name of Catholicism. Proofs of this are 
furnished us by a correspondence with Rome, 
which was revealed by unfaithful agents. Mary 
was implicated in a crime of the most flagrant 
and odious nature, namely, that of the Babing- 
ton Plot, the object of which was the death of 
Elizabeth. 

Letters secretly conveyed to Walsingham, the 
chief counsellor and minister of Elizabeth, prove 
this. They show some hesitation at first on the 
part of the conspirators regarding the propriety 
of the assassination of Elizabeth, and afterwards 



a decision in favor of the murderer Gifford, 
placed them in the hands of the queen's council, 
and the conspirators could not deny the plots. 

What punishment can be too great for one 
who is guilty of murder ? and can Mary's solicit- 
ors now expect us or ask us to forgive her for 
her vile deceit, pretending to love her husband, 
at the same time encouraging Bothwell, and act- 
ing so dishonestly and unwomanly in the case 
with him? Can we commend such actions? 
Can we, or do we, even wish to pardon a woman 
who has, in alliance with her husband's rival, 
plotted against the former's life ? Is there room 
in this world for one who would stoop to such 
a depth as so cruelly to destroy her husband's 
life ? No ; for this crime alone Elizabeth was 
certainly justifiable in beheading Mary. Again, 
Elizabeth is justifiable in beheading Mary to 
secure the throne against a Catholic successc r 
(for a nation has a right to prevent its religion 
from being overturned or jeopardized), an J to 
secure the nation from embarrassments, plots, 
and rebellions. That Mary was a bitter enemy 
to Elizabeth cannot be questioned ; that she con- 
spired against her we have proved. Now, if she 
sought her life, and was likely to attain so bloody 
an end as was generally feared, then Elizabeth, 
in self defence, was right in sanctioning the death 



of her rival. 



G. C. H. 



MARRIED. 



In Southbridge, Mass., Nov. 8, Miss Nina 
C. Bartholomew and Mr. G. Clarence Winter. 
At home, Thursdays in December, Oakes Avenue, 
Southbridge. 

At Denver, Col., Nov. 1, Miss Birdie May 
Routt and Mr. Harry W. Bryant. At home, 
Thursdays in December, at 1128 South 14th 
Street, Denver. 

In Bangor, Me., Oct. 9, Miss Nellie A. Kidder 
and Mr. Lester W. Cutter. At home, Thursdays, 
after Nov 10, at 6x Broadway. Bangor. 

Abbie R. Turner, at Lasell in '78, was mar- 
ried Nov. 21 to Franklin L. Dodge, at her home, 
in Lansing, Mich. Mr. and Mrs. Dodge will 
make their new home at 211 Capital Avenue, 
Lansing. 



32 



Lasell Leaves. 



Miss Mollie Crawford was married Nov. 14, 
to Mr. Frank L. Kidder. 

Meyer — Heinsheimer. — Miss Corinne Hein- 
sheimer to Mr. A. B. Meyer, both of Newark, N. J. 
At home, Sundays, Nov. 18 and 25, at 69 Court 
Street. No cards. 



PERSONALS. 

Miss Mary Cole, '88, has been spending a 
few days at Lasell with Edith Gale, '89. 

Emma Roth is teaching in Batavia, N. Y. 

Miss May Bigelow, of Worcester, Mass., visited 
Josephine Bogart lately, at Lasell. Miss Bigelow 
has bten in Alaska and California this last sum- 
mer, and expects to travel through Mexico in 
January. 

Mr. Davis's new house, on Centre Street, will 
be one of the handsomest in Auburndale. 

Prof. Hills gave the first lecture on " Musical 
Theory." The course will be given by different 
Boston musicians. 

Mrs. Lincoln has begun her lectures on cook- 
ing. A large number passed the examination as 
candidates for private lessons. 

Sue Brown, '88, surprised us all by her ap- 
pearance at Lasell. She remained only two days. 

The Rev. C. W. Cushing, D. D., former princi- 
pal of Lasell Seminary, is transferred from the 
Genesee to the W. Virginia Conference, and 
preaches at Fourth Street Methodist Church, 
Wheeling, Va. 

Miss Etta Stafford is still a student at Har- 
vard Annex, this year especially interested in 
logic, under Prof. Royce, and in U. S. history, 
French, and German. The other members of 
the family are in their new home, at Decatur, 111. 

Miss Helen H. Thresher is at her home, in 
Monson, Mass. She writes: "The Lasell pin 
already seems like an old friend, and I think it 
very pretty." 

Irene Cushman writes from Deadwood, in the 
State that couldn't get in, that she wants a Lasell 
pin, and the Leaves, and that she can cook 
" like everything." She writes her letter from 



beginning to end straight ahead, proving thereby 
that Lasell did her some good. 

Mr. Bragdon met Grace Stebbins on Tremont 
Street, the other day. She is still taking violin 
lessons. 

Lizzie Luther Lothrop, of Attleboro, sends, 
Oct. 27, the cards of her daughter, Mildred; weight, 
nine pounds. 

Lillie Fuller Merriam, '85, adds the photo- 
graph of her five-months' boy, Bernard Charles, 
to the grandchildren collection. Lillie rules 
wisely not only a husband and a child, but a fine 
new house, centrally located in South Framingham, 
which, as we were lately permitted to see, she 
makes a real home. 

Misses Kitty Colony, Altha Phelps, Bessie 
Sayford, Margaret Chapin, Bertha Simpson, Lucy 
Pennell, and Gertrude Smith called upon their old 
friends a short time ago. 

Mrs. Frederick Tibbitts, ne'e Miss Mabel 
Bliss, 75 Chester Square, Boston, was a guest at 
the Seminary lately. Mrs. Tibbetts was at Lasell 
in '85 and '86. 

Prof. W. J. Rolfe returned from his foreign 
tour and began his lessons in Shakespeare at 
Lasell on Tuesday, Oct. 29. "Julius Caesar" is 
the play to be studied at present. 

Mrs. W. H. Pearce, of Pittsburg, Pa., the aunt 
of Miss Etha Pearce, was one of the delegates at 
the Woman's Missionary Convention. 

We missed Gertrude White when we came back 
in September, and were sorry to hear that she 
had been ill, and would not return for a few 
weeks. In October, her only brother died, and 
she decided not to come back at all. She has 
the heartfelt sympathy of every old girl, and our 
hearty wish that she may soon be well and 
strong. 

LOCALS. 

HURRAH FOR HARRISON ! 

The result of the mock election at Lasell was 

as follows : — 

Republicans 9^ 

Democrats 21 

Prohibitionists 8 



Lasell Leaves. 



33 



UNPOPULAR GIRLS. 

A year ago 'twas Anna Kism 

From Chicago we detested, 
And following her came Polly Ticks, 

In whom we 're interested. 
These two we thought were bad enough, 

When another soon applies, 
And she we hate the worst of all, — 

Her name is Campaign Lize. 

The new bowling alley was dedicated by Mrs. 
Rutherford B. Hayes, who knocked down the pins 
in a way which showed she was not a novice. 

Which way does the Circuit train go ? 

Lasell girls' hearts are composed of two ven- 
tricles and two cuticles. 

The Seniors have graduated in physiology and 
spelling, and this is how they spell : Oricle, 
mocus, alementry, asophergus, polmunery. 

Teacher in English {vainly endeavoring to elicit 
some information from the beaming countenance be- 
fore her) . — What is an indulgence ? 

Girl of the B. C. {confident of having graspea 
one idea), — Oh! they were merely trinkets worn 
by the members of the Romanish church. 

Some of our most studious young women, una- 
ble to utilize the large amount of recreation we 
now possess, have formed themselves into a 
sewing circle, which meets at 4.30 p. m. They 
are at present endeavoring to clothe the sub- 
Freshmen. 

.According to our professor in logic, a chair 
is intended to hold one individual only. 

We assembled in chapel one evening to hear 
a lecture on "Memory," but our lecturer forgot 
his engagement. 

Young person (overflowing with information) : 
cooking is boiling, of course. 

A Lasell girl, calling upon a friend at Welles 
ley College, overheard the following conversation 
between two Sophomores : — 

No. 1. — I know Omaha is a Territory ! 

No. 2. — No ; I tell you it is in Canada ! 

And our Lasell Freshman settled the question 
by giving them the required information. 

On one of the Concord maps drawn by one 



of the excursionists, the cemetery, " Sleepy Hol- 
low," was designated as Suntiyside. 

One of our Western girls discovered acorns 
under a chestnut-tree, and on being told they 
were not chestnuts, asked meekly, " Well, then, are 
these the acorn burs ? " 

Two young ladies slumbering peacefully one 
night were awakened by a knock on the door, 
with the request, " not to talk so loud." 

Monday, Nov. 4, the Seminary doors were 
thrown wide open to receieve guests from the 
Methodist Convention, of Boston, Mrs. Ruther- 
ford B. Hayes being one of the number. Ail 
rooms were on exhibition during the afternoon, 
and order reigned supreme. After a tour of 
the building, from studio to gymnasium, a lunch 
was served in the dining-room, the table being 
artistically arranged under Mr. Shepherd's super- 
vision. We flatter ourselves that the visit was 
much enjoyed by every one. At 5.20 o'clock 
our guests departed for Boston. 

Besides Mrs. Hayes, there were present Mrs. 
M. McClellan Brown, president of Wesleyan 
College, Cincinnati, O., Mrs. Dr. Torrey, president 
of Kent's Hill Seminary, Maine, Mrs. A. F. 
Newman, Washington, D. C, Dr. Ela, of Boston, 
Dr. and Mrs. Packard, of South Boston, and many 
others. 

One thing we get gratis — suggestions. 

Third floor centre, 

Water tank ; 
Girl is thirsty, 

Lean, and lank. 

Time, 9.20, 

Teacher there ; 
Girl advances 

Up the stair. 

Girl with pitcher 

Quakes within, 
Sees the figure 

Tall and prim. 

Teacher squelches, 

Girl sent back ; 
And the pitcher 

Water lacks. 

November 2, a large party under the guidance 
of Prof. Bragdon attended the Republican rally 



34 



Lasell Leaves, 



held in Tremont Temple. Notwithstanding the 
crowd through wnich we at last managed to pass, 
we obtained excellent seats, and became very en- 
thusiastic over the stirring speeches made by 
some of our most prominent men. 

A number of young ladies visited the ocean 
steamer " Pavonia," of the Cunard Line, "Nov. 2, 
and were shown considerable attention. 

We have noticed that the girls occupying rooms 
between 35 and 40 faithfully continue the exercise 
in breathers even after the last bell at night. 

The following officers for the Lasellia Club 
have been elected : — 

President Miss Bogart. 

Vice-President Miss M. Oliver. 

Secretary Miss L. Freeman. 

Treasurer Miss D. Fowler. 

Critic Miss W. EwiNG. 

Guard Miss L. Burridge. 

Assistant Guard Miss E. Fowler. 

Executive Committee . . . \ MlSSES E " Lee > S " Day ' 

( and Mabel Clement. 

The officers of the S. D. Society stand as 
follows : — 

President Miss B. Harwood. 

Vice-President Miss Barbour. 

Secretary Miss Nora Gibson. 

Treasurer Miss Mae Sutton. 

Critic Miss Mary Packard. 

Usher Miss Grace Havens. 

Musicale Committee Miss Lucile Wyard. 



SCIENTIFIC NOTES. 

Mr. Alvin Clark, of Cambridgeport, maker 
of the great Lick telescope lens, placed, within 
the last year, in the Lick Observatory, on Mount 
Hamilton, California, is about to begin a forty- 
inch lens for the University of Southern Califor- 
nia, located at Los Angeles. The cost of such a 
lens will be between $400,000 and $500,000. He 
believes a five-foot lens can be made, but thinks 
it would take a man his lifetime. Hereafter, all 
the lenses will be made with the photographic 
lens, as then it will be possible to record all ob 
servations accurately. It adds only a trifle to the 
expense, and is more satisfactory. 

It is said that there are over seven hundred 
different varieties of pens, made of twelve different 
kinds of metals, wood, and quills. There are 



pens pointed fine enough to make lines of micro- 
scopic delicacy, and others intended for men who 
use the first personal pronoun in their correspond- 
ence a great deal. 

If it be true, as has been said, that the yellow- 
fever never attacks a cigarette smoker, then the 
disease is without a single redeeming feature. 

The question whether the rainfall is increasing 
on the plains has been investigated by Mr. M. W. 
Harrington, who, for the purpose, has examined 
two series of observations representing the aver- 
age conditions at the epochs of 1850 and 1880. 
They show an apparent increase of rainfall toward 

the plains. 

*-*-> 

POLITICAL NOTES. 

Exit the Mugwumps ! Vanish the Free Traders ! 
In other words, farewell to Cleveland ! Welcome 
to Harrison ! 

The campaign has been one of popular educa- 
tion, and its effects are seen everywhere in the in- 
creased respect which people and politicians pay 
to principles, and in the establishment of reason 
over prejudice. The reform will still continue to 
be reached after and worked for with Gen. 
Harrison as President. 

It is said that, in spite of Mr. Cleveland's 
elaborate professions of equanimity, he takes his 
defeat very hard. 

Governor Hill seems to have gotten along 
very well without " the letter that never came." 

A graduate of Harvard College, who feels 
himself thoroughly competent to arrange a policy 
for the great industries of this country, walked up 
to the polls on election day, and, with great 
ostentation, pasted the names of Cleveland and 
Thurman over those of Harrison and Morton, 
and then deposited his vote. As he leit the 
Republican electors unchanged, he did not ac- 
complish his intent. 

There is a great deal of complaint made every 
four years of the excitement, the disturbance to 
business, and all the disagreeable features of a 
Presidential elecion ; but it is worth all it costs, 
in the stirring up of thought on great questions 



Lasell Leaves. 



35 



of national policy, which would otherwise hardly 
penetrate through the crust of daily associations 
and interests until they were forced on the atten- 
tion by some national calamity. In other words, 
it is better to have a quadrennial fever than a 
centennial earthquake. 

They say the Republican party is dead ! A 
very lively corpse, we think. 



With heart aglow and eyes ablaze, 
He drew much nearer than before ; 

When, to his horror and amaze, 
He saw " To Let " upon the door. 



MUSICAL NOTES. 

Josef Hofmann is growing stout. 

Mrs. Ole Bull has returned from Norway to 
her home in Cambridge. 

Miss Gertrude Franklin contemplates going 
to London again next spring. 

Music is a higher revelation than science and 
philosophy. — Beethoven. 

Haydn received five hundred pounds for the 
first six grand symphonies, known as the " Solo- 
mon Symphonies." 

The Austrian composer, Karl Goldmark, was 
compelled to shoot a finch lately, because it took 
up its quarters near his house, at Grunden, and 
prevented him from composing. We shudder to 
think of the punishment Goldmark would inflict 
upon an Italian organ-grinder if the latter were 
to stop under his window and play " Sweet 
Violets." 

A curious paper by an English organist, upon 
" Melody in Speech," asserts that a cow moos in 
a perfect fifth and octave or tenth ; a dog barks 
in a fifth or fourth ; a donkey brays in a perfect 
octave ; a horse neighs in a descent on the chro- 
matic scale. Each person has his fundamental 
key in which he generally speaks, but which he 
often transposes in sympathy with other voices, or 
when he is excited. 

a serenade, 

A youth went forth to serenade 
The lady whom he loved the best, 

And passed beneath the mansion's shade 
Where erst his charmer used to rest. 

He warbled till the morning light 
Came dancing o'er the hilltops' rim ; 

But no fair maiden blessed his sight, 
And all seemed dark and drear to him. 



ART NOTES. 

The new portion of the Museum of Fine Arts 
progresses rapidly, though it will not be ready for 
occupancy before next spring. A mass of anti- 
quities, casts, pictures, and other works of art 
awaits exhibition space. The court-yard will prob- 
ably be used for large monumental sculptures'too 
bulky to be displayed indoors. 

A special exhibiton of Albert Diirer's engrav- 
ings, etchings, and of most of the woodcuts exe- 
cuted from his designs, selected from the collec- 
tion of Henry E. Sewell, of New York, and from 
the Gray collection of prints belonging to Harvard 
College, will be opened Nov. 15, in the print de- 
partment of the Museum of Fine Arts, to continue 
two months. This exhibition will contain a prac- 
tically complete set of Diirer's works. The series 
of exhibitions of which this is one is of great edu- 
cational importance and value, as it gives us from 
time to time the opportunity to study systemati- 
cally the works of the greatest engravers of all 
times. 

George Thompson, the English water colorist, 
many of whose pictures are owned in Boston, has 
been visiting New Haven, Conn. He is a cousin 
of the celebrated battle painter, Elizabeth Thomp- 
son. 

The Caledonian societies of the United States 
have erected and recently unveiled a statue of 
Robert Burns at Albany, N. Y. It is the design 
of the sculptor Charles Caverly. 

The statue of Longfellow was unveiled in Port- 
land, Oct. 1, and presented to the city. 

Mrs. Nathan Appi.eton, of Boston, is at the 
head of a movement to raise funds for a statue 
of Washington, to be presented to the French 
government by the women of America. 

Some late additions to the collection of pictures 
at Lasell are : — 

1. " A Cloud on the Honeymoon," by J. Ward 
Dunsmore. 



36 



Lasell Leaves. 



2. "Path under the Birches," by Minnie G. 
Speare, of Newton Centre. 

3,4. "Two Flower Studies," one of dande- 
lions, by L. W. Roberts, of Bangor, Me., and one 
of " May-flowers," by E. M. Lincoln, of Cam- 
bridge. 

5. "The Shepherdess," by A. Roosenboom, of 
the Hague. 

The flower pieces are by pupils of Geo. Seavey, 
of Boston. No. 1 is a celebrated picture, having 
been twice engraved, once for a plate, and once 
for reproduction in the London Art Journal. 
" The Shepherdess " is one of the best pictures in 
the collection. The figure of the girl makes one 
think of Meyer von Bremen's work. 

John Ward Dunsmore, who painted " A Cloud 
on the Honeymoon " and " All 's Fair in Love 
and War," in our gallery, has been appointed 
director of the new Art Museum in Detroit, and 
will at once return from London to assume the 
duties of the position. A good appointment, we 
say. 

t-^~i 

EXCHANGES. 

It is a pleasant task to look over a pile of 
exchanges and moralize thereon. All grades of 
merit are represented, good, bad, and indiffer- 
ent. Some are distinctively literary monthlies, 
others are college newspapers, while still others 
are a happy or unhappy blending of both. Of 
late years college journalism has assumed an im- 
portant place in college work. Almost every 
school of note sends out a representative maga- 
zine, and is largely judged by the degree of ex- 
cellence to which it attains. Remembering this, 
should we not endeavor to make our college 
paper the best possible ? Should we not give 
to it our best mental efforts, and if we have 
any light, set it upon a high hill, where it can be 
seen by all men, and not under a bushel ? 

The Yale Record is still engaged in developing 
its remarkable illustrative powers. 

The Lampoon has twice made its appearance 
since our last issue, and life is once more worth 
the living. 

We are happy to add to our list of exchanges 
the Chauncy Hall Abstract, Boston. 



The Oak, Lily, and Lvy, Milford, Mass., has 
assumed a new form, and is much more attractive 
than of old. 

The editorials of the Seminary Tattler, Steu- 
benville, Ohio, are most flowery, both in ideas 
and in the expression thereof. The following 
important announcement was the first thing to 
greet our eyes as we glanced over this exchange : 
"The Seminary Tattler, with all its prettiness and 
naughtiness, virtues and failings, is again a thing 
of the present." 

Poor little Tattler! It is so young and inno- 
cent ! It has not yet cut its teeth, to quote its 
own words, so we presume we must make allow- 
ance for its failures, and overlook its naughtiness. 

The Tech is out at last, and is full to overflow- 
ing with prophecies and exhortations about foot- 
ball. However, it contains some good editorials 
on the subject, and no one could find it in his 
heart to censure them for the large amount of 
space devoted to athletics, when he sees how en- 
thusiastic they are, and how hard they are striving 
to make "Tech. Foot Ball Team, Champions 
1889," as they were in 1888. Success be with 
them ! 

We extend our congratulations to the Algis 
upon its new cover, which adds greatly to the 
beauty of its appearance. The " Eulogy " of 
Edgar Allan Poe, in its issue of the 21st ult, is 
an exceedingly well-written article, full of good 
thoughts, clothed in beautiful language ; but is 
not the praise of the poet a little fulsome ? 

The Hamilton College Monthly is like the 
United States treasury: it contains a surplus, not 
of the almighty dollar, but of essays. Though 
some of these are interesting and excellent in 
'point of composition, we believe your paper would 
be more acceptable to the general reader, if among 
the heavy matter was interspersed something of a 
lighter character. Talent and ability need not 
necessarily produce essays ; indeed, we doubt not 
that humorous sketches and poetical fancies are 
the offspring of the highest talent and the great- 
est ability. In this line you are sadly lacking, 
and have room for much improvement. 

We are proud of the Vasmr Miscellany and 
Ogontz Mosaic, two college journals of high literary 



Lasell Leaves. 



37 



merit, which are (whether evidently or not) the 
product of the feminine mind. The October 
Mosaic contains a re'sume of the life of Joan 
D'Arc which is well worth the reading ; and stu- 
dents of literature will find an interesting article 
on " Chaucer " in the first issue of the Miscellany. 

There is much good reading between the front 
cover and the advertisements of the Amherst 
Literary Monthly. This is one of the few college 
publications that is purely literary. The summer 
idyl, " Our Vacation," interested and pleased us 
much. It does not bear upon its face the stamp 
of the amateur, as do so many of the romances 
published in our college papers. But all in vain 
did we apply to it the rules which the Lit. itself 
lays down for ascertaining where the writer of a 
summer idyl spent his summer vacation. We 
could not solve the problem. We fear that we 
are stupid, and our stupidity gives us much 
sorrow.. 



FOR YOUNG WRITERS AND SPEAKERS. 

"TS. ••• DECIDE ••■ OR ••■ ORHTORY," 

PRICE, CLOTH, $1.00. 

A beautiful and substantial little book containing; eleven orations which have 
been awarded the annual $100.00 Kirlc prize at Northwestern University — the 
highest honor in the gift of the institution. Worth many times its price to young 
writers and speakers. Shows what styles of oratory are successful before mature 
iudges. A study at these orations mat/ brino you prizes or honor in your own 
school. Address UNIVERSITY PRtfSS CO , Evanston, 111. 

J. N. LINDSAY & CO., 

STERLING SILVER^ REED & BARTON'S PLATED WARE, 

Also, Plating, Gilding and Repairing. 

421 WASHINGTON ST., BOSTON. 



GHO. H. WHITFORD. 



HENRY T. HARTWELL. 



G. H. HOPKINS & CO. 



SCHOOL, 



CHURCH AND 

-^^OPERA 

SEATINGS. 

31 Milk St., Boston, Mass. 



FOOLED. 

The time was summer (this of course), 

The place was Mount Desert, 
A simple student then was I, 

And she a giddy flirt. 
We boated on a quiet lake, 

Played tennis on a lea, 
And evenings sat ?nd watched the ships 

Fade into night and sea. 
The weeks sped by like arrows swift, 

Till cool September came ; 
My suit no longer could I hide, 

But told with heart aflame. 



Now probably you think she changed, 

And, b ing but a flirt, 
Gave me the mitten on the spot 

With manner cool and curt ; 
Alas ! there lies my present grief, 

For came no answer slow ; 
She smiled, put up her lips to kiss, 

With, "Charley, it 'sago." 

Williams Weekly. 



OUNG'S HOTEL 



EUROPEAN PLAN. 



Y 

OPPOSITE THE HEAD OF STATE STREET, BOIT2V. 

Ladies' entrance, Court Street, near Washington Street. 

J. R. WHIPPLE, PROPRIETOR. 

MdFAELDre 

CHINA PARLOR, 

39 FRANKLIN STREET, BOSTON, 

SPECIALTIES IN 

pine China and Cut QIass. 

OPEN ON NOV. 1, 1888, 

A Full Line of Novelties foic 
GHRISTMHS. 

TO NE)W YORK luKfiSfi" 




F 



ARES REDUCED. 
ALL RIVER LINE. 



Express trains, connecting with steamer at Fall River in So minutes, 
leave Boston from Old Colony station week days at fi P. M., Sundays at 7 
P. M. Due in New York at about 7.30. A. M. Connection to Brooklyn 
and Jersey City by Annex Boat. 

Steamers PILGRIM and KRISIOL in commission. Steam heat in 
staterooms. AN ORCHESTRA on each steamer throughout the year. 
Baggage checked from hotel or residence to destination. Returning, 
steamers leave New York daily, Sundays included. 

Tickets, staterooms, etc., secured at the line office, No. 3, Old State 
House, and at the Old Colony station. 
J. R. KENDRICK, GEO. L. CONNOR, 

General Manager. Gen'l Pass'r Agt. 

L. H. PALMER, Agt. 

3 Old State House. 



38 



Las ell Leaves. 



Allen Solly & Co.'s High-class 
Hosiery and Underwear, in the natural 
gray lamb's wool, white merino, and the famous 
brown, all weights and sizes, 28 to 50 inches, at 
Noye. Bros.' 

Blanket Wraps for the Nursery, the 
Bath, the Sick-room, or Steamer Travelling, 
for Men, Women, Children and the Baby, at 
Noyes Bkos.' 

Morning and Evening Wedding 
Outfits, i 1 Shirts, Collars, Cravats and 
Gloves, a specialty at Noyes Bros.' 

English Mackintosh Coats, for Ladies 
and Gentlemen, at Noyhs Bros.' 

English Silk Umbrellas, in Gold, Silver 
and Natural Wood Handles, Ladies' and 
Men's, $2.75 to #35.00, very rare and choice 
designs, at Noyes Bros.' 

English Travelling Rugs, for Railway 
and Steamer Use, $3.75 to #50.00, at Noyes 
Bros.' 

English Dressing Gowns, Study 
Coats, House Coats and Office Coats, 
and Long Wraps, $5.00 to $45.00, in stock 
or to measure, at Noyes Bros.' 

NOYES BROS., 

Hosiers, Glovers and Shirt Makers, 

Washington and Summer Streets, 

BOSTON, U. S. A. 




Blanket Wraps for the Nursery, for the 
Sick-room, for the Bath, for Steamer Travelling, 
for the Railway Carriages, for Yachting, for Men, 
Women, Children and the Baby, at Noyes Bros.' 

Blanket Slippers for the Sick-room, the Bath 
or Dressing-room, for Men, Women and Children, 
at 75 cents per pair, at Noyes Bros.' 

English Holdalls, indispensable to Travellers, 
at Noyes Bros.' 

New English Neck Wear, Collars, Cuffs 
and Dress Shirts, in every possible style and quality, 
at Noyes Bros.' 

Ladies' Silk Umbrellas in Fancy Colored 
Stripes. Plaids and Large Figures; new, stylish and 
desiiable, at Noyes Bros.' 

The last London production in Ladies' English 
Waterproofs are to be had at Noyes Bros.', 
$7.50 to $45.00 — just opened. 



DRESS .SHIRTS 

For Weddings and Receptions. 

The present fashion of Shirts with Liren 
Cords, Embroidered Figures and Spot Bosoms, 
may be had of Noyes Bros , most thorough'y 
and elegantly made. 

We have a Special Deparime.st for Re- 
pairing Shirts, Hosiery Underwtar. Gloves, or 
any article belonging to Gentlemen; can be 
laundered and re air. d at short notice at 
Noyes Bros.' 

There are 81 offices in Boston who advertise 
Troy Laundry. Messrs. Noyes Bro.s. 
are the only house in Boston that actually 
send goods there. 

We send the work every day, and return in 
five days, and give new g< ods for any damaged. 

Special Laundry Hepartment for 

Dress Shirts, Vests aid Wash-Scarfs. Rc- 
laundered t qual to new goods at No\ es Bros.' 

Family Laundry Work called for and 
returned with no extra charge. 

NOYES BROS., 

Hosiers, Glovers and Shirt Makers 

Washington and Summer Sleets, 

BOSTON, MASS., U. S. A. 



ESTABLISHED 1817. 



JOHN H. PRAY, SONS & CO. 

Importers. Jobbers, Retailers and Manufacturers' igents. 

Carpetings, Mattings, Oil Cloth, 

ORIENTAL RUGS, 

CARPETS AND UPHOLSTERY. 



558 and 560 Washington St., 

30 to 34 Harrison Ave. Extension, 



BOSTON. 



113 Worth Street 



NEW YORK. 



Lasell Leaves. 



39 



A. STOWELL & CO. 

24 Winter Street, Boston. 



£>onie of our Specialties : 

Bohemian Garnet Jewelry. 

Amber Beads and Ornaments. 

Tortoise-Shell Hair Pins. 

Choice Leather Goods. 

Oxidized Silver Jewelry. 

Fans for all occasions. 

Pearl Opera Glasses. 

Fine Gold Jewelry. 

Wedding Presents in Clocks, Vases and 
Bronzes. 

LATEST NOVELTIES IN ALL DEPARTMENTS. 
Lowest Prices. 



PL, 



o 

o 
O 

w 

o 



pq 
Z 

6 
w 

o 




o 



< 

0_ 
UJ 



o 



LU 

ct 

LU 

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DC 

o 



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o 

I- 
z 

UJ 

i- 

< 



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LU 
Q_ 
</> 



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YOTJjNTG LADIES' 

P/^SjHio^bije; 5^oes 

OF ALL KINDS. 

THAYER, MCNEIL & HODGKINS, 

47 Temple Place, Boston. 

ARTHUR P. SCHMIDT & CO. 

IMPORTERS OF AND DEALERS IN 

FOREIGN AND AMERICAN 

Sheet Music. 

Sole Agents lor Lilolffs Celebrated Edition ol 
Classical and Modern Music. 

13 and 15 West St., Boston. 

Catalogues sent free on application. 






BOSTON FOREIGN BOOK STORE, 

BOOKS IN ALL FOREIGN LANGUAGES. 

CARL. SCHOENHOF, 
144 Tremont Street - One Flight Up 



HENRY W. GOODWIN. 

Union Cabinets 



AND 



Perfection Roll Toilet Paper, 

BRYANT & MAYS PARLOR, WAX AND SAFETY MATCHES. 

114 MILK STREET, 
BOSTON - " MHSS. 

Prices furnished upon application. 

"h. h. newellT 

DEALER IN 

Boots, Shoes and Rubbers. 

Repairing of all kinds Neatly and Promptly Done, 

POST OFFICE BUILDING - - AUBURN ST., 

BOSTON. 



ESTABLISHED 1840. 



Isaac Locke & Company, 

Produce Commission Merchants, 

And Dealers iti 

FOREIGN and DOMESTIC FRUITS 

97, 99 and 101 Fanenll Hall MarKet, and Basement 18 Sontn Side, 

BOSTON - - - MASS. 

S^- Telephone Connection. 



4 o 



La sell Leaves. 



-x-WEBER ; S-x- 



25, 27 TEMPLE PLACE 



BOSTON, 



AND 33 WEST STREET, 

Ladies' and Gents' Restaurant, 

Oysters and Salads a Specialty. 

OPEN AFTER THEATRES. 

Caterer for Wedding Breakfasts, Lunches, Dinner and Evening Parties 

and Receptions. Also, Club Suppers at Short Notice 

and Reasonable Prices. 



S: "W. 



BAILEY, 

DEALER IN 



WAi CHES, JEWELRY, SILVERWARE, ETC. 

353 Washington St., Boston. (Up One Plight.) 

Jewelry Neatly Repaired. Also, Monograms on Coin Pieces. Personal 
Attention given to Repairing Fine Watches. 

ESTABLISHED 1847- 



AARON K. GAY & CO. 

No. 122 State Street, Boston, 

STATIONERS 



AND 



BLANK BOO K MANUF ACTURERS, 

First-Class Account Books of any desired 
pattern made to order. 

S. S. GAY. EDWIN W. GAY. 

JUST WHAT HAS BEEN WANTED. 

.A LADIES' LUNCH ROOM 

HAS BEEN OPENED AT 



23 AVON STREET, BOSTON. 

neat place, where a nice Lunch can be had at a 
All the ladies say, " Isn't it nice ? " 

T. D. COOK, Caterer. 



A quiet, neat place, where a nice Lunch can be had at a very reason- 
able price. All the ladies say, " Is n't it nice ? " 



Wedding and other Parties 

Served with the Choicest Viands, and by Competent Waiters. 

SUPERIOR ICE-CREAM 

DELIVERED AT REASONABLE PRICES. 
T-VVO MIIiLIOHT HEADERS 

Are a great many to claim for one publication, but it is un- 
doubtedly true that as many read The Youth's Companion 
every week. It has a world-wide reputation, and is sent all over 
the globe where the English language is spoken or read. The 
reason for its large circulation is found in its exceptional value. 
It is always safe, pure, entertaining, and instructive. Its influ- 
ence upon growing boys and girls can hardly be overestimated. 
It is remembered affectionately by their parents, who read it a 
generation ago. We would call the attention of our readers 
to the Special Offer of the publishers, an opportunity which 
comes but once a year. Any new subscriber to The Com- 
panion who will send $1.75 at once can have the paper free 
to Jan. 1, 1889, and for a full year from that date. This offer 
includes four holiday numbers, for Thanksgiving, Christmas, 
New Year's, and Easter, all the Illustrated Weekly Supple- 
ments, and the Annual Premium List with 500 illustrations. 
Address The Youth's Companion, Boston, Mass. 



FURS. 



IMPORTANT SUGGESTION. 



Furs to be altered and repaired 
will receive prompt and careful 
attention, -with less expense, before 
cold weather crowds our furriers 
with work. Seals to be re-dyed 
should be sent to us at once. 

We are now receiving orders for 
our well-known superior seal gar- 
ments made to measure. 

Our Sealskins this season de- 
serve special mention for quality 
and richness, never before sur- 
passed. Patrons who place their 
orders with us early will appre- 
ciate this suggestion. 

JOS. -A. JACKSON, 

4! 2 WASHINGTON ST., BOSTON. 
Established 1825. 

NATHAN NEOAT & GO. 

MANUFACTURERS OF 
_.,.^^^^_ JfUSTJi] -^.-^^r-«- 

TRUNKS AND TRAMIM BAGS. 

BASKET TRUNKS AND STEAMER CHAIRS. 
Stateroom and Light-Weight Trunks for European Travel. 



SEND FOR ILLUSTRATED CATALOGUE. 



566 WASHINGTON ST., BOSTON, MASS. 

De Wolfe, Fiske & Co., 

BOOKSELLERS, 
361 AND 365 WASHINGTON STREET. 



¥nnr Qlrttin M/\ Qfi<) / All the New Popular and Standard Books at 
lloW OlOIt), M 001. j lowest prices, Gift Books, Bibles, Albums, etc. 

AwllWilV Hf\ -Ifi^ I Bargains in cheap editions, Second-hand and 
nlOIlWdi. I1U1 DUO. ) paper-covered books, Juveniles, etc., etc. 

THE MOST COMPLETE BOOK-STORE IN BOSTON. 



Lasell Leaves. 



4i 



Shreve, Crump k Low Co. 

432 WASHINGTON ST. 

BOSTON. 

yi/ atches, £[) iarrioTids, 
Q ewelr ij, 

f inest (lottery. 



Designs furnished for Class Rings, Pins, Etc. 

A Fine Assortment of Choicest Stationery. 
Invitations, Cards and Programmes. 



W. H. FRENCH & CO. 

PLUMBERS, GAS FITTERS, 



■ AND 



SANITARY ENGINEERS. 

JUDSON'S BUILDING, OPP. RAILROAD STATION, 
WEST NEWTON. 



All Work Promptly Attended to and Warranted Satisfactory. 

I. W. CONROY & SON, 

fiOUSE^SIGN PETERS, 

WEST NEWTON, MASS. 

Chestnut St., near Depot. 

Residence, cor. Cherry and Derby Sts. 
glazier work a. specialty. 



THE "PEERLESS" FOUNTAIN PEN 




IS THE PERFECTION OF FOUNTAIN PENS. 

Is a hard rubber holder fitted with a 16 k. gold pen of the best manufacture, and will never wear out. It will write ten thousand words with one 
filling of ink, and for taking lectures, etc., it is indispensable. There is no loss of time in dipping ink as with the ordinary pen, as the " Peerless " 
has a perfect, even and uninterrupted flow of ink, and is the best fountain pen manufactured. Price, 8S3. 00. 

The Cross Stylographic Pen, Stylographic Ink. All styles of Stylographic, Fountain, and Gold Pens repaired. 



THE CROSS PEN CO., 306 Washington St. 



BOSTON, MASS. 



nSTEiSZT IDOOIK, TO OLD SOTTTH CHTJSCH. 



a- tjj o. :e. 

12 Winter Street 



ALLEK 
• - - - Boston. 



BUTTONS, LACES, YARNS, CORSETS 



AND FANCY GOODS- 



IT. H. HUNT, 

CARPENTER AND BUILDER, 

WEST NEWTON, MASS. 
Shop near R. R. Crossing. P. 0. Box 235. 





SEPH £1 LLOTY'S 
STEEL PEV 



THE FAVORITE NUMBERS, 303,404, 332,351, 170, 

AND HIS OTOER STYLES 

SOLD by ALL DEALERS throughout the WORLD* 




42 



Lasell Leaves. 



C. H. CODMAN & CO. 

Photographic Material, 

PICTURE and FRAME DEALERS' 

<A SUPPLIES > 
Wholesale and Retail Framing 

AMATEUR PHOTOGRAPHIC APPARATUS. 

34 BROMFIELD STREET, 
BOSTON - - - MASS. 

LIVERY, HACK, 



^jsrr> 



BOARDING STABLE. 



ESTABLISHED IS6I. 



S. F. CATE, WEST NEWTON 



Barge " City of Newton." 
Boat Sleigh "Snow Bird." 

HIXjL &s. &OWE1T, 

(Successors to A. A. Kendall,) 

COMMISSION MERCHANTS and Dealers in 

FOREIGN AND DOMESTIC FRUITS AND PRODUCE, 

a.b.hill. Nos. 13 and 15 Merchants Row, BOSTON, c. s. gowen. 
HEINrRY MAIS, 

LADIES' HAIR DRESSER. 

Ladies' Hair Cut, Curled, and Shampooed in the most 

Artistic Manner. 

68 TEMvUPLE PLACE - - BOSTON. 



FANCY GROCERIES A SPECIALTY- 



H. E. WOODBERRY, 

DEALER IN FINE GROCERIES, 

Cor. of Washington and Chestnut Sts., West Newton, Mass. 



BRANCH AT AUBURNDAUE. 



HHLL S COLE, 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 

FRU1TS__mdIVEGETABLES j 

100 and 102 Faneuil Hall Market, Boston. 



C. J. LITTLEFIELD, 

DEALER IN 

Fruits knd Produce. 

terms cash. No. 24 NORTH MARKET ST., BOSTON. 
D. WL. OLIVER & CO., 

DEALERS IN 

PORK, LARD, HAMS, BACON, 

Sausages, Tripe, Dried Beef, Beef Tongues, Bolognas, etc. 
26 Faneuil Hall, or Quincy Market - - BOSTON. 



HARRISOH SWAN. 



STEPHEN J. MOULTOH. 



HARRISON SWAN & CO., 



DEALERS IN 



poultry apd U/ild Qa/T)e. 

1 Faneuil Hall Market, 

BOSTON. 

TELEPHONE CONNECTION. 

MILLS &. DEERING, 

RECEIVERS AND DEALERS IN 

BUTTER, CHEESE *P EGGS, 

STALL 22, QUINCY MARKET, BOSTON. 
W. C. MILLS. E. F. DEERING. 

JOHN <P. SQUIRE & CO., 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

ABSOLUTELY PURE LARD. 

21, 23, and 25 Faneuil Hall Market, Boston, Mass, 

J". KNOWLES & SOUSTS, 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 



Fresh, Smoked and Pickled Fish, Oysters and Clams, 

Stalls 121 and 123 FANEUIL HALL MAKKET. 

J. KNOWLEA. R. H. KNOWLES. J. A. KNOWLES. 



GEORGE E. RICHARDSON & CO., 

DEALERS IN 

Foreign and Domestio Fruits, Produce, Nuts, 

Cigars, Tohaoco, Etc California Fruit a Specialty. 
No. 1 FANEUIL HALL SQUARE 
(Opposite South side of Faneuil Hall). 
Geo. E. Richardson. Frank E. Richardson. 

SLAYTON &o BOYNTON, 
COMMISSION MERCHANTS 

FOR THESALEOFGENERAL PRODUCE 

19 BLACKSTONE STREET, BOSTON. 



J. C F. SLAYTON. 



TELEPHONE NO. 1761. 



W. W. BOYNTON. 



SPECTACLES 

MADE TO 
ORDER AND 
REPAIRED. 

L. J. Mc INTIRE, OPTICIAN, 
NO. 357 WASHINGTON ST.. BOSTON. 




Lasell Leaves. 



MRS. LflNGTRY„^XCrs h cti 



ren &* & Souveuir with each Uutllt. 



Amateur Fhotography. Just the Thing for Country or Seaside. 

HORSMAiVS No. 3 ECLIPSE OUTFIT. 

i PRICE $10.00 

Camera makes a 
Full Size CABI- 
NET PHOTO- 
GRAPH or view, 
siz* 4^ by 6H in., 
and is provided 
with an attachment 
for making; verti- 
cal or horizontal 
pictures. It con- 
sists of Polished 
Hardwood Camera 
with Folding Bed, 
Double Plate 
Holder, Fine Brass 
Mounted Lens 
with set of Stops, 
Folding Tripod, 
Carrying Case, 
Printing Frame, 
and Complete 
Chemical Outfit. 

1 Specimen Pho- 
tograph made with 
No. 3 Outfit by 
mail on receipt 
of 10c. 

fob sat.b by THOMAS HALL, 19 Bromfield Street, Boston, Mass. 

H. E. JOHNSON, D. D. S. 

DENTAL ROOMS, 

Office Hours, 8.30 a. m. to 5 p. m. 

ROBINSON'S BLOCK, WEST NEWTON, MASS. 




PICKERING & GILBERT, 

Commission Merchants and Jobbers in 

BUTTER, CHEESE, EGGS, ETC. 

Stall, 89 Quincy Market, Boston. 
f. a. pickering. james gilbert. 

ALFRED BRUSH, 
APOTHECARY, 

Plummer's Block, Cor. of Auburn and Lexington Sts. 

auburndale. 

'88. MISS H. A. SPROUT, '88. 

DRESSMAKER, 

AUBURN STREET, AUBURNDALE. 

ELLIOT W. KEYES, 

APOTHECARY, 

Haskins' Block - - - Auburn Street, 
auburndale, mass. 

MRS. LT COOK, 

DRESSMAKER 

Woodbine Street - - Auburndale. 
V. A. PLUTA, 

Dealer in PROVISIONS, 

Cor. Auburn and Lexington Streets. 
"FARNUM &. COMPANY, 
PKODUCE COMMISSION MERCHANTS, 

Wholesale Dealers in Apples, Potatoes, Cranberries, Onions, Peas, 
Beans, Dried Apples, Oranges and Lemons. 

Nos. 108 and ixo Faneuil Hall Market - - BOSTON. 

Henry Farnum. W. W. Lawrence. 



FROST & ADAMS, 

Importers or, and Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 

ARTISTS' MATERIALS, 

decorative art novelties, art 
pottery, etc. 



Ebonized Panels. 

Winsor & Newton's Colors. 

German Colors. 

French Colors. 

Tucker & Green's Colors. 

Sketch Blocks. 

Plaques of all kinds. 

China Colors. 

Mirrors for Decorating. 

Artists* Boxes. 

Artists' Brushes. 

Artists' Canvas. 

Handbooks on Art. 

Studies of all kinds. 

Lustra Painting Materials. 



Water Colors. 

Bronzes. 

Brocades, 

Spangles. 

China for Decorating. 

Paper Panels. 

Tambourines. 

Repousse Materials. 

Canvas Stretched. 

Drawing Instruments. 

Plaque Pirns. 

Artists' Easels. 

Drawing Paper. 

Materials for Tapestry, etc. 

Kensington Painting Materials 



Schools and Students Supplied at Low Figures. 

37 CORNHILL, BOSTON 

SEND FOR A CATALOGUE. 
F. S. FROST. H. A. LAWRENCE. 

Geo. E. Johnson, 

DEALER IN 

HAY, GRAIN AND PEED, 

Lexington Street, Auburndale. 



NEAR DEPOT. 



TELEPHONE 8150. 



CHARLES G. TINKHAM, 

Livery, Had awl Boiflii Stable, 

Cor. of Lexington and Severn Sts., 
AUBURNDALE. 

JOHNSON & KEYES EXPRESS CO, 

GEO. E. JOHNSON, Prop. 

AUBURNDALE AND BOSTON. 

Office, Lexington St., Auburndale. Boston Office, 105^ Arch St. and 

34 Court Sq. Boston Order Box, Bourne's Cellar, 13 F. H. Market. 

MOVING PIANOS AND FURNITURE A SPECIALTY. 

ALBEBT IF. WEIGHT, 
Successor to H. E. FLEMING, 

* PHAEMACIST, * 

Near City Hall, West Newton. 
TELEPHONE. 



DECEMBER, 1888. 




L/^elx Le/ii/^s 



VOLUME XIM.-No. 3. 



CONTENTS. 



Editorials 

For the Lasell Pew 

A Testimonial 



45 
47 
47 



Retrospection 48 

Originality 48 

The Magic Hair-Pin 49 

Good Resolutions for the Morrow . . . • S° 

Personals 50 

Marriages ......... 52 



Deaths . 
Locals 
Marguerite 
Scientific Notes 
Political Notes 
Musical Notes 
Art Notes 
Exchanges 
Leap Year 



52 
52 
54 

54 
54 
54 
55 
55 
56 



L 



Lasell Leaves. 



COBB, BATES & YERXA, 

IMF OR TURS 



AND 



GROCERS. 



Twenty-dollar orders delivered free at any station 
within 50 miles of Boston, and fifty-dollar orders at 
any station in New England, at our regular retail prices. 



OUR SPECIALTIES. 

AMERICAN WATCHES, 
-^DIAMONDS,*- 

Sterling Silver Ware, French Clocks and Bronzes, Fine 
Plated Ware, Jewelry and Fancy Goods. 

Designs and Estimates for Class Rings, Pins and Badges furnished 
without charge. 



COBB, BATES k YERXA, 

680 to 692 Washington Street, 
3 Bowdoin Square, 

6 and 8 Faneuil Hall Square. 

Also in 

CHELSEA, FALL EIVEE and TAUNTON. 



N. G. WOOD & SONS, 

467 WASHINGTON ST., BOSTON. 

LAWRENCE, WILDE & CO. 

Manufacturers of First-Class 

FURNITURE 



AND 



INTERIOR DECORATIONS, 

Nos. 38 to 48 Cornhill - ■ Boston. 



A. Lawrence. 
Wm. H. Hull. 



Geo. B. Darrow. 
F. D. Wilde. 



ESTABLISHED 1S30. 



ALFRED MUDGE & SON, 

PRINTERS, 

No. 24 FRANKLIN STREET, BOSTON, MASS. 

HAVE UNSURPASSED FACILITIES FOR 

BOOK AND MISCELLANEOUS PRINTING, 

ELECTROTYPING AND STEREOTYPING, 

MERCANTILE AND COMMERCIAL PRINTING, 

FANCY BALL AND SOCIETY PRINTING. 



LAW WORK A SPECIALTY. 

A FULL LINE OF WEDDING STATIONERY ENGRAVED OR PRINTED. 

WEDDING OUTFITS executed in the finest manner at reasonable prices. 

Information regarding work in any department wilt at all times be promptly furnished, either 
personally or by correspondence. 

ALFRED MUDGE & SON, 24 FRANKLIN STREET. 



Lasell Leaves. 



43 



COBB, ALDRICH & CO. 

WHOLESALE # RETAIL GROCERS, 



AND IMPORTERS AND RETAILERS OF 



The Finest Garden Teas. 

WE ARE THE ONLY HOUSE WHO RETAIL THE VERY 

Finest Garden Formosa, Japan and English Breakfast Teas, at 70 cts. per lb. 

Choice Teas in the different grades, ranging in price from 35c. to 60c. per lb. 

Use the "Diamond" Mocha and Java, the very best Coffee in the world, 32c. lb., 3 lbs. for 95c. 

ALSO, THE LARGEST AND BEST ASSORTED STOCK OF 

trlctlg First-class Staple and Fancy Groceries, Canned Gooffs, Flour, Etc. 

to be found in New England. A handsome and convenient Catalogue of goods, with prices, issued 
monthly. Copies mailed to any address. 

Cobb, Aldrich & Co., 

722 to 732 Washington Street - BOSTON. 



T. E. MOSELEY & CO. 



DEALERS IN 



BOOTS, SHOES, RUBBERS, ETC, 

FOR LADIES, GENTLEMEN, BOYS, 
MISSES AND CHILDREN. 

A Large Assortment for 

YOUNG LHDIES. 



GYMNASIUM SHOES 

In Great Variety. 

ENGLISH LAST WALKING BOOTS, 

In CALF or GOAT, 
Are SENSIBLE, DURABLE, and REASONABLE in Price. 



T. E. MOSELEY & CO. 

469 Washington Street, 

BOSTON. 



GOOD THINGS MUSICAL FOR 1888, 1889. 

Whatever they are, the music to perform them, to understand 
them, to enjoy them, will be found in the immense establishments of 

OLIiZER DITSON St CO., who have on hand 

CONCERT SONGS, GOSPEL SONGS, SACRED SONGS, SCHOOL 
SONGS, SUNDAY SCHOOL SONGS, COMIC SONGS, COLLEGE 
S0i\GS, JUBILEE SONGS, POPULAR S-NGS, CHOIR AND CON- 
GREGATIONAL MUSIC, TONIC-SOL-FA MUSIC, CATHOLIC 
MUSIC, ANTHEMS AND CHORUSES, PART-SONGS AND 
GLEES, OPERA, ORATORIO AND CANTATA MUSIC, COLLEC- 
TIONS OP MUSIC FOR PIANO, ORGAN, AND ALL OTHER 
INSTRUMENTS, AND IN FACT EVERY RIND OF MUSIC 
THAT IS MADE, 

All this is in the shape of Sheet Music (3,000,000 pieces), Octavo 
Music (3,010 kinds), or of music collected iu well-bound books (4,000 
kinds). Send for Lists, Catalogues, Descriptions aud Advice. Any 
book mailed for retail price. 

SOME OF THE NEWEST BOOKS ARE: 
PIANO CLASSICS, CLASSICAL PIANIST, YOUNG PEOPLE'S 
CLASSICS, SONG CLASSICS, Soprano j SONG CLASSICS, Alto 
and Bass j CLASSIC TENOR SONGS. Each $1.00. Very select 
and good mnsic. 

Seud the price of any book and receive it by return mail. The con- 
venience of this arrangement is appreciated by thousands of cus- 



tomers. 



OLIVER DITSON & CO., BOSTON. 



C. IE\ IBIDIDY <Sc OO 

COAL. 

We furnish all the Coal used at " Lasell.' 
C. K. EDDY & CO. 

WEST NEWTON, MASS. 



44 



Lasell Leaves. 



LADIES' FINE FOOTWEAR. 



We have added for Autumn and Winter, many new lines, in- 
cluding specialties of which we have exclusive control. 



GYMNASIUM SHOES, 
WEDDING AND PARTY 
BOOTS AND SLIPPERS. 



HENRY H. TUTTLE & CO. 

43 B Washington Street, 
BOSTON. 



NOVELTIES 



IN 



MILLINERY 



RECEIVED DAILY from PARIS and LONDON. 



Ladies are invited to call and examine before purchasing 
elsewhere. Correct Styles. Popular prices. 



HENRY M. BURR & CO. 



490 Washington Street, 



BOSTON 




THE CLASSY, 



PHOTOGRAPHER 



-ri- 



For Lasell Seminary, 
-*'88*-' 



Studio, S£ Winter Street; 



BOSTON. 



LASELL LEAVES. 



DUX FEMINA FACTI." 



Volume XIII, 



LASELL SEMINARY, AUBLipEALE, 



DECEMBER 1BBB. 



pmber 3, 



LASELL LEAVES. 

Published Monthly, during the School Year, 

BY THE 

Lasell Publishing Association 

OF 

I.A SELL SEMINARY FOR YOUNG WOMEN, 

Auburndale, Mass. 

Edito r-in- Ch ief. 
JOSEPHINE BOGART, '89. 

Business Manager. 
MAUDE OLIVER '89. 



Local Editor. 
GRACE SKINNER. 

Political Editor. 
MABEL CLEMENT, '91. 

Musical Editor. 
MARIE MOGER. 



Exchange Editor. 
WINNIE B. EWING, '89. 

Scientific Editor. 
ADA MARSH. 

A rt Editor. 
PRISCTLLA PARMENTER. 



Subscription Agent. 
NANCY BOYCE, '91. 



TERMS, IN ADVANCE. 

One Copy, one year (including postage) . . $1.00 
Single Numbers ....... 15 cts. 





ADVERTISING RATES. 




SPACE. 


3 MONTHS. 


6 MONTHS. 


9 MONTHS. 


I-I2 


column .... 


$1.50 


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5.OO 


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20.00 


1 




12.00 


I9.OO 


2c;.oo 
3 






Press of Alfred Mudge &> Sou, 24 Franklin St., Boston. 



Mr. Joseph Chamberlain's selection of a part- 
ner for life has given the newspapers on both 
sides of the Atlantic something to talk about ; in 
consequence, the all-absorbing topics, " Is Mar- 
riage a Failure ? " and " The Deceased Wife's Sis- 
ter," have been enabled to take a much-needed 
rest. Our attention has also been attracted to 
the fact that, from statistics, the American girl 
seems to be away above par in the matrimonial 
market, in the eyes of the men of all nations, but 
especially the Englishmen. This is not much of 
a compliment to the much-lauded English girl, 
in comparison with whom, in current literature, 
the American girl has often been made to suffer. 

Why is she in such demand ? One says that 

money accounts for it ; another, physical beauty. 

The first answer may carry weight with it ; for it 

is an established fact that the women of no other 

nation possess the independent fortunes that 

American women do, and the glitter of the 

" mighty dollar" will dazzle even a sturdy John 

Bull or a phlegmatic Deutscher. Of the admirer 

of physical beauty, we ask, where is the coquettish 

French demoiselle, or the fascinating Spanish sig- 

norina, whom poetry and romance have made 

world renowned ? The gallant of England seems 

indifferent to these charmers, who live so near his 

own little island, and crosses the raging waste of 

waters to select a wife from the daughters of 

America. 

But, granted that these reasons are good, still, 
we do not believe either of them to be the real 
one. There is a much grander and nobler cause. 
The American girl from childhood has been 
taught independence and self-reliance, and to 
make herself felt not only in the social world and 
in the home but in wider spheres of usefulness. 
She has been given a broader field than her Euro- 
pean sisters, and, by our American civilization, 
has been placed in positions of high responsibility. 



46 



Lasell Leaves. 



Beauty and money are merely accessories of the 
American girl ; her intelligence is the shrine 
before which all kneel. Our girls are able not 
only to discuss the theory of " concomitant varia- 
tions," or render a sonata by Beethoven, but they 
can do that which is quite as creditable, go into 
the kitchen, if necessary, and cook. 

We do not say that there are no intellectual or 
cultivated women in Great Britain, but that thev 
are the exception rather than the rule ; and the 
preference of Englishmen for our girls supports 
this belief. Mr. Chamberlain, certainly, has some 
reason to know English women, as this is his third 
matrimonial venture. Evidently he, at least, found 
them somewhat wanting, and decided to try an 
American cousin. 

" It is not, as has been urged, that there are cer- 
tain harum-scarum, tomboy qualities about the 
American girl that attract the foreigner, and 
inveigle him into the matrimonial web. Our girls 
are spirited and full of life. Plenty of out-door 
exercise adds to their graces physically, and con- 
stant mingling with companions, each anxious to 
shine as the bright particular star in each little 
group, sharpens them mentally, and makes them 
more than a ready match for the dullards or the 
indolent. 

" The namby-pamby, spiritless creature is a 
scarcity this side of the Atlantic. It is needless to 
say, that the namby-pamby girl does not wed the 
wife-hunting foreigner, nor the American wife- 
hunter either, for that matter." 



The misspellings of Lasell have been so fre- 
quent and varied in the past that we had about 
concluded that human ingenuity could invent no 
other, when along came a letter from a well-known 
New York firm directed to " Lev all Sem." Imme- 
diately our mind undergoes a metamorphosis, and 
the conclusion is reached by us, that there is 
something "new under the sun," although we 
have been repeatedly assured to the contrary. 
Possibly the fault lies in our chirography, but we 
think not, as, after four years' experience, we 
have learned to indite our epistles in a neat copy- 
book hand, using "Joseph Gillott, 303." 

Having eased our conscience on this point, we 
proceed to the spelling our Alma Mater's name. 



The latest spellings wlvch have come to light, 
besides the one already mentioned, are La Belle 
and Lecele Great has been our wonder as to what 
there is so difficult about the word " Lasell " that 
all mankind should err. Even such near neigh- 
bors as our Newton friends cannot overcome the 
trouble ; and the placard on the fire-alarm in front 
of the building informs us that " the keys can be pro- 
cured at Lassell Sem." 

We once came very near losing a piece of valu- 
able jewelry on account of this inexplicable 
stupidity on the part of the public. In this case 
we were in the right, for once, as we took par- 
ticular pains to spell the word for the jeweller's 
clerk. After working ourselves into a fever of ex- 
citement over the non-appearance of our property, 
we went upon an investigating tour, and found 
that it had been marked Marseille, and but for our 
timely research would probably be reposing in the 
possession of some Frenchwoman. 

One person, not content with misspelling Lasell, 
takes it upon himself to rearrange the spelling of 
Auburndale. " There is a limit at which forbear- 
ance ceases to be a virtue," and when Lesah 
and Arbondell appear upon the same envelope, 
we think the limit has been reached. 

We offer as a suggestion to our friends that they 
remember that the name of our school is a simple 
word of six letters, spelled as it is pronounced. 
Now don't remember the former and forget the 
latter, or we fear it will become Dasell or La/ell. 

We trust that when the American church in 
Berlin is completed, and it is time to put the plate 
upon the Lasell pew, a competent committee will 
be appointed to carefully examine the orthography. 
We shudder to think of the horrible forms those 
foreigners might twist it into ; and we wish to add, 
by way of emphasis, that the committee be very 
efficient. We give below, for the benefit of the 
reader, a list of the various spellings: Lassell, 
La Salle, La Belle, Lacele, Laselle, Levall, Las- 
celle, Lesall ; but the "last straw" is "Mrs. 
Laselle Sem." 



Thanksgiving, with its proverbial turkey and 
bountiful dinner, has come and gone, and we 
have returned to perpetuate the time-worn jokes 
gathered during recess, upon our unsuspecting 



Lasell Leaves. 



47 



friends. The standard question, " Had a good 
time ? " is now at a discount, and "Going home 
Christmas?" has taken its place. It is thought 
that if the Christmas vacation is attended with 
results similar to those of Thanksgiving, the resi- 
dent physician will be enabled to retire, and live 
in opulence the remainder of her days. 

Now Christmas, with its holiday gladness, is 
drawing near, and the swiftly flying days bring 
thoughts of home and good times. Only two 
weeks and most of us will be homeward bound. 
This thought buoys up our sinking spirits and 
somewhat arouses us from the dejection into 
which we have been plunged, by the sudden 
descent from the pleasures of Thanksgiving 
into the humdrum routine of school life. It is 
needless to say that even an interim of only two 
weeks will be welcome, as our brains as well as 
our wardrobes need renovating. 

We had hoped to edify our readers with an 
elaborate discouise upon Christmas, but at the 
last moment, the religious editor, whose duty it is 
to write up the holidays, failed us. The subject 
of Christmas has been so thoroughly canvassed 
that the cobwebbed brains of the remainder of 
the board failed to produce anything new; so we 
content ourselves with referring you to an ably 
written article in the Editor's Drawer of the Har- 
per s Monthly for December. We heartily indorse 
the writer's idea of a Christmas " Trust," and 
hope some enterprising person will establish one. 
It would be of benefit to us, as the editoiial 
purse, like the world-renowned turkey of Job, is 
so weak it " can't stand alone," and after Christ- 
mas, when another heavy drain will be made upon 
it, we contemplate going into insolvency. 

After this number of the Leaves, we shall, 
like President Cleveland, retire into private life, 
and relapse into " innocuous desuetude." The 
act of the Arab seems becoming to our style, so 
we shall " quietly steal away." We feel assured 
that this manner of exit is very dignified and 
lady-like, but human nature will assert itself, and 
away down in our secret hearts we would rather 
depart with some eclat, — a complimentary din- 
ner or the regulation gold-headed cane would 
not be amiss. What would we do with a cane ? 
Well, we know. Redfern in all of his adver- 
tisements puts a walking stick into the hafkls of 



his ladies, and of course we would rather not 
inhabit this mundane sphere than be out of 
fashion. 

But to return to the subject of our exit. No 
more shall we be pointed out as the " Editors 
of the Lasell Leaves, you know ! " no more 
shall we fall a prey to the wiles of the office 
boy; we shall be to glory and to fame unknown. 
However, there is something to be gained by 
relinquishing the insignia. Our friends will be- 
come reconciled to us, and the throwing of 

language at us, because we have seen fit to 
criticise some of their eccentricities, will be dis- 
continued ; our room-mate's life will once more 
be worth living ; we shall have time to devote 
ourselves to cultivating " that form of expression 
which yields its contained idea with the least 
expenditure of mental power," in other words, 
to writing a Senior thesis. 

With these reflections, and a hearty welcome 
to the in-coming board, we step down and out, 
wishing you all a Merry Christmas and a Happy 
New- Year. 



FOR THE LASELL PEW. 



A generous friend of education, an intelligent 
layman, of Minneapolis, has, unasked, sent the 
money for one share in the " Lasell Pew" in the 
American church in Berlin. He saw at once the 
value of such a centre of religious life for our 
American students in that great capital. As 
friends of America, not to say Christians, it is at 
once clear to thoughtful persons that it is vital to 
our Republic, that the youth who go to Germany 
for educational help should come back to us strength- 
ened and not weakened in spiritual life. If others 
choose to help this good cause, Lasell will be 
glad to be the responsible almoner of their 
bounty. 

*-*-* 

I want to give unsolicited testimony to the 
satisfaction I have had in the use of the A. T. 
Cross stylographic pen. I have used one pen for 
over two years, without a cent's expense for repairs. 
It has never once failed me, or soiled my fingers. 
or behaved in any way uncivilly. I used it one 
year for pencil and pen in Europe, travelling from 
place to place, and it required no special care. 1 



4 8 



Lasell Leaves. 



have sold many to my pupils, and in no case have 

I known of any failure to give entire satisfaction 

where fair care was given it. I had before tried, 

without pleasure, two other kinds, and have heard 

a deal of complaint among my pupils of other 

sorts, before we began to use wholly the Cross. 

This is without the knowledge of the Cross Pen 

Company, and wholly, as I think, in the interests 

of users. 

C. C. BRAGDON, Principal 



RETROSPECTION. 



Full many a backward thought I cast, 
And thought with tender memory blends 

( )'er school days now forever past, 
And girls I fondly called my friends. 

Bright glowing clays — e'en fate was kind ; 

Old Time himself we did beguile. 
In musing mood I call to mind 

Our fun and frolic, and I smile. 

I picture now that close-knit band, 
Around the well-remembered fire ; 

There, soul met soul, and hand touched hand, 
Where now ? I of my heart inquire. 

The " Leaves " gives us the happy end. 

Some of those girls we used to know 
Have said, " Oh, dearer than a friend, 

Where'er thou goest I will go ! " 

Swift Time o'er us has quickly flown ; 

We're one* year nearer life's fourscore; 
Hut some have seen " the great white throne," 

And time for them shall be no more. 

Dear comrades then of eighty-seven, 
Bring in your sheaves while yet ye may; 

With zeal we'll strive — for earth or heaven, 
And alway watch and work and pray. • 

Ho, Lasell voyagers in life's bark ! 

Wherever tempest tossed we be, 
We '11 hail each other in the dark, 

As ships speak other ships at sea. 



'87. 



ALL IN A ROW. 



A Yale graduate, who was a student about 
thirty years ago, said, in speaking of changes that 
had taken place since his time: "I never knew 
whether to attach any significance to it or not, but 
when I was there the law school adjoined the jail, 
the medical college was next the cemetery, and 
the divinity school was on the road to the poor- 
house." — Hartford Post. 



ORIGINALITY. 

One is made conscious daily that " there is 
nothing new under the sun." 

As a result of thoughtful research, there may 
develop in a man's mind some idea, which he con- 
gratulates himself has been revealed to him alone. 
Upon comparing his thoughts with those of others 
on the same subject, he finds he is sadly deluded ; 
his pet idea, in substance, is centuries old, and 
may have been firmly established in the mind of 
some antediluvian. Such rebuffs are natural in 
the course of earnest inquiry, though it must be 
granted that in specific departments, as the sciences, 
remarkable revelations have been made during the 
last two centuries. Great spiritual and moral prin- 
ciples vary to no noticeable degree, as the ages move 
on, and the commonplace truths are changeless. 

As it is not given to men as a class to institute 
great reforms in thought, and, consequently, in lit- 
erature and conversation, we immediately query 
if the remaining mass of humanity are doomed to 
be ordinary and correspondingly tiresome. That 
they are so we are convinced by the numberless 
illustrations in every- day events. In conversa- 
tion, the average person discusses with avidity 
the weather, the last new buildings, the latest 
fashions, and then makes a merciless raid upon 
the little peculiarities of a chance acquaintance. 
These subjects exhausted, the conversation must 
cease, or continue in still more useless channels. 
On a rainy day, our model of either a common- 
place or exceedingly thoughtless man will call 
out to a passer-by, " A rainy day," as if he were 
imparting an exciting bit of news, while his friend 
no doubt has realized the said fact most painfully, 
when wading through deep pools of- water and 
walking over muddy crossings. He invariably 
asks some one, who is standing in a doorway, 
wraps on, and umbrella raised, if he is going out. 
Such a man may be called " good-natured " and 
" well-meaning," but he calls forth no admiration 
nor approval from one of culture and intelligence. 
He contents himself with an ordinary amount of 
knowledge, imparts it in an ordinary manner, and 
is, consequently, an ordinary man. 

On the other hand, we find an example in one 
whom we shall call "original." We take this to 
mean, not that he is a great reformer, nor that he 
possesses a marvellous brain, but that he is well 



Las ell Leaves. 



49 



informed, is a vigorous thinker, and that, above 
all, he has that happy expression of his thoughts 
which universally interests and captivates. 

A rusty, faded hat is sometimes brought from 
the garret, and, at first glance, is condemned as 
useless, but by a little skilful renovating and 
retrimming, it may be so improved and beautified 
as to be hardly recognizable. This very homely 
illustration may serve to show the method of 
thought of an original man. He begins with a 
truth which may be covered with the dust of ages, 
but by his powers of imagination and speech he 
embellishes the old truth, and so presents it, that 
it is gladly received. To men of rather peculiar 
temperament, Truth has, by reason of her severe, 
plain garb, become tiresome, and they turn away 
to seek the more attractive. If she were clothed 
in her fairest as well as her simplest form, she 
would be accepted more universally. 

In brief, the original man charms and interests 
not so greatly by the brilliancy of his thoughts as 
by the powers of expressing them through pen or 
tongue. In order to comprehend, in some slight 
degree, how he has acquired this ability, let it be 
granted that he comes into the world endowed 
with the same mental capacity as the average 
man. He has a great struggle be'fore him. It 
b.gins when he first becomes conscious of his own 
p >wers and the possibilities before him. As he 
looks into the intellectual world around he is 
aware that to investigate for himself what men 
have been ages in revealing is impossible. Hence 
he accepts their condensed testimony, and event- 
ually finds them verified and confirmed by ex- 
perience and observation. He devotes himself 
not only to the acquisition of mere knowledge, 
but acquaints himself with the varied moods and 
fancies of those he chances to meet, and thus 
can appreciate what will attract them. 

As, in the effort to become great in the opin- 
ion of the world, many have incurred well-merited 
ridicule, so, in attempting to be a trifle new or 
original in thought or speech, one may easily 
become absurd. But we claim that there is a 
desirable medium, well worthy of earnest en- 
deavor, which will come so gradually and unas- 
sumingly that its fortunate possessor may never 
realize its existence in himself, though it will be 
apparent to others. E. E, P., '90. 



THE MAGIC HAIR-PIN. 

The proof of a boy's mechanical skill is what 
he can do with a jack-knife ; the proof of a wo- 
man's is what she can do with a hair-pin. Few 
women take naturally to otdinary tools. They 
use hammers in a gingerly and ridiculous manner, 
or they pound their fingers with them ; they put 
blunt pointed nails along instead of across the 
grain, and then wonder why it splits ; they use 
screw-drivers principally to pry open boxes ; and 
they think wire pincers were made to crack 
nuts with ; but they know how to manage a 
hair-pin. 

" A lady," said an observant gentleman the 
other day, " always opens a letter better than a 
man. A man tears off a corner, and then pulls 
the envelope more or less to pieces in getting at 
the contents ; but a lady draws a hair-pin, inserts 
one prong at a corner, and rips open the edge as 
neatly and quickly as if the tool were made for 
the purpose." 

With the same " tool " she can, and frequently 
does, button her gloves, and occasionally her 
boots. She cuts the magazines with it; she 
twists it into clasps for broken jewelry ; she uses 
it to suspend plaques ; she employs it to draw 
corks, and also to snuff candles ; she inserts it 
into windows to keep them from rattling, and uses 
it to brace back shades that incline to tumble 
down ; she succeeds, with its help, in turning 
the hasps of windows Trom the outside, when 
obliged, by accidental lock-out, to burglarize her 
own house ; she arms herself with it when trav- 
elling to keep disagreeable neighbors at a respect- 
ful distance ; she files receipts upon it ; she pins 
up notices to the milkman with it ; she even bends 
it roughly into the form of an initial, and hangs 
it in the keyhole of her intimate friend's lock, 
by way of a card, when she has forgotten her 
card-case, and the family are out. 

The fan has long been regarded as the object 
most suggestive of the Spanish women. Ladies 
of other countries are famed for their especially 
graceful or skilful use of other dainty, feminine 
articles. But if we were asked to select the 
thing most truly representative of the great Amer- 
ican girl, we would name without hesitation the 
neat, the ingenious, the inexhaustible, the magic 
hair-pin. — Ex. 



50 



Lasell Leaves. 



Ox :. of the memorable moments of my life is 
that in which, as I trudged to my little school on 
a wintry day, my eyes fell upon a large yellow 
Doster with these delicious words : " ' Bertha,' a 
new tale by the author of 'The Rival Prima 
Donnas,' will appear in the Saturday Evening 
GazetteS I was late ; it was bitter cold; people 
jostled me ; I was mortally afraid I should be rec- 
ognized ; but there X stood, feasting my eyes on 
the fascinating poster, and saying proudly to my- 
self, in the words of the great Vincent Crummles ; 
" This, this is fame ! " That day my pupils had 
an indulgent teacher ; for, while they struggled 
with their pothooks, I was writing immortal works, 
and when they droned out the multiplication-table 
I was counting up the noble fortune my pen was 
to earn for me in the dim, delightful future. That 
afternoon my sisters made a pilgrimage to behold 
this famous placard, and, finding it torn by the 
wind, boldly stole it, and came home to wave it 
like a triumphal banner in the bosom of the ex- 
cited family. The tattered paper still exists, 
folded away with other relics of those early days, 
so hard and yet so sweet, when the first small vic- 
tories were won, and the enthusiasm of youth lent 
romance to life's drudgery. — Louisa M. Alcott. 



GOOD RESOLUTIONS FOR THE MORROW. 

As you will doubtless see, 

I am not an " S. G." ; 

Yet I crave your leave to mention 

Some virtues that I '11 borrow 
When the dawning ,of another sun 

Proclaims it is the morrow. 

Then listen while I tell, 
I '11 hear the rising bell, 
And spring up like a soaring lark 

Into the atmosphere, 
And dress myself in clothing 

That 's not scattered far and near. 

All properly and slow, 
To breakfast then I '11 go; 

And eat most plentiful 
Of brain and muscle making food, 

And never touch 
What 's indigestible, though good. 

At table I '11 begin 

To call my bad French in; 



With foreign shrug 
I '11 meekly ask for bread 

With many a pang, 
And try good Deutsch to sprechcn 

Instead of English slang. 

To-morrow I '11 not devour, 
During my practice hour, 

A novel, but prove 
Faithful to arpeggios and scales, 

And try to force sweet melody 
Up through my finger-nails. 

To-morrow, in our college, 

I '11 attack the tree of knowledge; 

All the ologies and isms 
I '11 welcome to my brain, 

Like sardines in a box, 
I '11 pack all one head can contain. 

To-morrow, in my walk, 
I will confine my talk 

To petrifaction, 
Fishes in fossiliferous rocks; 

Or the which-ly of the why-for, 
Inducing earthquake shocks. 

The path I will not scan, 
To spy a fellow-man, 

Because I know it is not right 
Such beings to discover; 

And on to-morrow 
I am going to turn a new leaf over. 

On to-morrow I will be 
As good as an " S. G." 

I '11 not consider a 
Teacher as a natural enemy. 

When they read these " resolutions " 
How delighted they will be ! 

Yes, to-morrozu I '11 begin 
All this fine " shading in." 

But you '11 hurt my feelings awfully if 
You should think or say, 

" Why not put into practice 
All these good works to-day ? " 



H. S. J. 



PERSONALS. 



Miss Alice Ward's engagement to Mr. Nicholas 
Thomas is announced. 

Miss Bogart, '89, visited at Vassar College 
and in New York during the Thanksgiving recess. 

Miss Anna Staley was the guest of Maude 
Stone, '88, in vacation. 



Lasell Leaves. 



Si 



In the book, " The Daughters of America." 
lately received in the library, there is a very in- 
teresting notice of Miss Carpenter, which will be 
doubly interesting to all those who know her. 

Annie Gage has been visiting Jennie Gardner 
in Chicago, but is no>v at her home, in Paines- 
ville. 

Miss Winnifred Ewing was at Miss Bessie 
Sayford's, in Newton, during the vacation. 

Misses Gilbert and Ewing, '89, visited Miss 
Oliver, '89, in vacation at her home, in East 
Saugus. 

Grace Stebbins called during the vacation. 
Her address is 3 Yarmouth Strtet. We ask her 
to call again when we are all at home. 

Dr. B. G. Northrop, of Clinton, Conn, the 
well-known educational lecturer, who expected to 
give the lecture on " Memory " at Lasell, had a 
narrow escape from death last week. He was 
driving out at Nassau, N. Y., in company with 
Rev. L. Hall, when a runaway team with a loaded 
wagon dashed into the buggy in which they were, 
completely demolishing it. Mr. Hall was nearly 
killed, but is now expected to recover. Dr. 
Northrop was badly bruised, and has been com- 
pelled to cancel all lecture engagements for some 
weeks. 

A pleasant letter from Florence Ryan, who is 
now at Berlin, tells us she attended service 
at Dr. Stuckenberg's house. She seems to be 
enjoying Europe, and will soon leave Berlin to 
visit Dre-den, Vienna, Munich, Italy, and Spain, 
reaching France about the middle of May. The 
summer she expects to spend in Switzerland and 
the British Isles. The best wishes of all Lasell 
friends go with her. 

Jessie Reece made Lasell a short visit Nov. 
23. She recently gave a lunch at her home, in 
Chicago, in honor of her former school-mate, 
Martina Grubbs. Among those present were 
Hattie Woodcock, Margaret Cook, Mattie Fowler, 
and Mrs. Nellie Brown Shattuck. 

Etta Stafford, of '86, called on us last week. 
Full of enthusiasm about her work, she would 
make the girls who are doing only what they have 
to, ashamed of themselves in ten minutes. 



Mrs. Lou Best Cumnock, of Chicopee, made 
her sister, Rosa Best, and her old school home, a 
brief call last week. 

The painful, but not unexpected news of the 
death of our beloved professor, R. R. Raymond, 
Shakespearian reader, comes to us a little tar- 
dily. We wish it might not have come for year?. 
What he has been to Lasell no other man vil 
ever be. It hardly seems possible that death has 
stilled that loving voice with its magic art. We 
mourn him not merely as a revered instructor but 
as a beloved friend, whom not to meet again 
would be eternal loss. 

Mr. and Mrs. Edward P. Call leave New- 
ton this week to take up their permanent resi- 
dence in New York City, where Mr. Call has 
accepted a position in the adveitising department 
of the Royal Baking Powder Company, one of 
the wealthiest concerns in the country. Although 
the change will be a step in advance for Mr. Call, 
his fiiends regret that it calls him away from New- 
ton, where he has many warm friends, and he will 
be greitly missed. He has been connected with 
the Boston Herald for almost twelve years, and 
for the last four has had charge of the advertising 
department, and severs his connection with the 
Herald much to the regret of the owners of the 
paper. For the present Mr. and Mrs. Call will 
board at the Gilsey House, New York, where Mrs. 
Call's parents are staying. 

The above, f 1 om the Newton Graphic, will be 
of interest to the friends of Mamie Marshall, 
whom they may not readily recognize by her later 
name, — Mrs. E. P. Call, — although she is getting 
quite used to it. Mr. Call is our Miss Call's 
brother. 

Annie Lovering Barrett. '81, with her hus- 
band, made Lasell a most welcome call in Novem- 
ber. They were taking their annual vacation with 
his friends in Melrose. Anna has n't changed 
any since the old days, except, perhaps, a little 
for the belter. By all appearances, she has a 
happy lot in life. She lives at 134 1 L Street, 
Washington, D. C. 

Lillie Eddy, '88, recently visited Laura 
Munger in Xenia, Ohio. 

Lizzie Atwater is visiting Annie Mitchell, 
'87. 



52 



Lasell Leaves. 



Miss Nellie Packard, '84, visited her sisters 
here for a few days. 

Lucie McBrier is visiting Stella Toynton and 
Flora Whitney in Detroit. 

Miss Mary A. Robarts, class of '85, is filling 
her place in the Normal faculty with good success 
and satisfaction. Well-directed energy and abil- 
ity are sure to tell in the school-room. Miss 
Robarts spent the past summer in the East, mak- 
ing especial preparation for her work in the 
department of book-keeping, which was placed in 
her charge by the trustees last spring. — Carbon- 
dale A T ormal Gazette. 

Gertrude Gove, here from Cambridge last 
year, and well liked among us, is this year study- 
ing music and kindergarten work. 

Louise Knill was maid of honor at Miss 
Wood's wedding. 

Carrie Kendig Kellogg, '79, and Annie 
Kendig Pierce, '80, spent Thanksgiving with their 
parents in Brooklyn. The papers of the next day 
give extended notice of what must have been a 
remarkable sermon by their father, Dr. Kendig, 
who seems to be as popular in Brooklyn as he is 
missed in Boston. The report of the Daily 
Union begins : " It was a striking scene ; men and 
women, carried away by the hot words of the 
preacher, arose as a single person, waving hand- 
kerchiefs, and cheering vociferously. This was in 
the Hanson Place M. E. Church, yesterday- 
morning." The subject was the Attacks of the 
Jesuits on our Public Schools. 



MARRIED. 

At Moosic, Penn., Nov. 14, 1888, Mabel M. 
Olds to Charles L. McMillan. 

Miss Nannie Carey Wood, formerly of class 
'89, was married Dec. 6, 1888, at her home, in 
Piqua, Ohio, to Mr. William Kendall Leonard. 



DEATHS. 
Died. — November, '88, at Bennington, Vt., 
Mabel Cooper Graves. 

The Framingham Tribune of Nov. 30 brings 
us the sad news of the death of Mr. Adolphus 
Merriam. Mr. Merriam is the father of our 
Bessie, and her many Lasell friends would express 
deep sympathy in this great afflicti n. 



LOCALS. 

Snow — at last ! 

"Jackdaw's strut in peacock's feathers." 

Something remarkable in the shape of a United 
Stales map is at present on exhibition in room 27. 

Young lady, examining a dress, said: "Isn't 
it antique?" (Meaning unique.) 

No. 1. — Do you like Rider Haggard's works? 
No. 2. — Oh, yes! they are so full of my- 
thology. 

Two young ladies were seen wearing one boa. 
The observer remarked, " I have known of two 
girls having one beau, but never one boa." 

In spelling : — 

Girl {thirsting for knowledge). — What is the 
meaning of stagnant, please? 

Teacher, willing to define, but, words failing, 
accidentally illustrates by pointing directly in the 
direction of the pond within. 

We were requested to pass in a list of our 
favorite hymns. After doing so, one "crazy" 
young lady ventured to remark, she had never 
been allowed so many hints on a list at Lasell 
before. 

Maiden {interested in drill). — Can you buy 
them? 

" Earthly things are fleeting," as a near-sighted 
professor said when he tried to hang a map on a 

fly. 

Resolutions, like fainting people, should be 
carried out. 

Topics of conversation at the Senior table : — 
"Actions vs. Possibilities." — (Only once.) 
" Laws of agreement and difference." — (Mostly 
difference.) 

" Is marriage a failure? " — (No theories on this 
subject have been deduced, as all insist upon talk- 
ing at once.) 

"The psychology of dreams." — (Too deep for 
y e local editor.) 

" Palmistry formulated as a science." 

The above are interspersed with such brand- 
new jokes as, " the red-headed girl and white 
horse," "the lightest I could get," etc. 



Lasell Leaves. 



53 



It is suggested to the members of other tables 
that they read carefully these subjects, and, hav- 
ing pondered thereon, "go and do likewise." 

Thanksgiving day at Lasell proved to be a 
very enjoyable one, and the forty Lasellians with 
their thirty guests sat down to the following 
main : — 

LASELL'S THANKSGIVING 

For 18S8. 

Oysters on Deep Shell. 



Sou/). 



Consomme. 



Mock Turtle. 



Fish. 

Baked Red Snapper. 

Green Pease. Dressed Lettuce. 



Entries. 

Roast Venison and Jelly. Cranberry Sauce. 

Baked Sweet Potatoes. 
Roast Turkey. Roast Goose. 

Mashed Potatoes. Cauliflower. Squash. 



Chicken Salad. 
Celery. 



Tongue. 
Olives. 



Pastry. 

Mince Pie. Pumpkin Pie. 

Baked Indian Pudding. 



Ice Cream. 
Fruit. 



Dessert. 
Sherbert. Cake. Lemon Jelly. 

Nuts. Raisins. 

Cheese. Coffee. 



As year by year we celebrate the day, 

So let us keep the feast with joy and mirth, 

As did the Pilgrims — love and good display, 
And spread the spirit of it through the earth. 

The promptness of our girls' in returning after 
Thanksgiving was something admirable and won- 
derful. Every girl was in her place for evening- 
chapel, with one or two exceptions, and those 
were cases of dire necessity. The girls who 
spent the vacation at the Seminary are loud in 
their praises of the good time they enjoyed. 

On the first Sunday of vacation, a parly of 
girls attended the Chanuccah celebration in the 
Temple Adath Israel of Boston. 

Five young ladies attended the foot-ball game 
between the Yale and Harvard Freshmen, Nov. 30. 



All old girls will be sorry to hear of the loss 
of Mr. Shepherd's green-house, which burned 
nearly to the ground on the first morning of 
vacation. Many of the valuable plants were 
utterly ruined, some choice palms being among 
the number. We shall miss the tastefully arranged 
bouquets which Mr. Shepherd often placed on the 
chapel desk and elsewhere. 

The Lasell branch of the Y. W. C. T. U. gave 
a very unique entertainment in the gymnasium, 
Nov. 24. The room was beautifully decorated in 
white scarfs and flowers. The letters Y. W. C. 
T. U. were artistically arranged over the brick 
fireplace, and the two State banners, presented 
to the society for the occasion, were much 
admired, both being of exquisite design and 
workmanship. 

Temperance songs were sung, and Miss Fanny 
Foster rendered a vocal solo with temperance 
words. Ice cream and cake were served during 
the evening, and Rebecca presided at a well of 
the temperance drink — lemonade. 

A large number of the new Lasell pins are 
being worn and are much admired. Many old 
girls have sent for them already, and it is to be 
hoped that all Lasellians will send their orders 
soon. 

Any one wishing to receive suggestions as to 
the correct apparel to be worn to dinner, may do 
so by calling on the young occupant of room 
No. 44. 

\From The French Table] 

Hungry Junior {to neighbor).— Voulez-vous 
pass the beurre/ 

Neighbor {too accustomed " to that sort of thing" 
to mind it much) . — Out, certainly. 

During the recent severe storm which we had, 
one of the girls inquired of another which way 
she thought the wind was, to which her friend 
replied, " The Gale is behind you." 

What young lady has been mostly discussed 
lately? Polly Ticks. 

Any old shoes, bottles, tooth-brushes, etc., will 
be thankfully received at room No. 41 for the 
night serenadBrs. 



54 



eaves. 



MARGUERITE. 

Marguerite, my love, my true one, 
Tell me what thou dost betray, 

Gazing deep into the fire-light, 
With thy thoughts far, far away. 

Dost thou dream of some brave warrior 

'Listed in the battle's woe ? 
Or has fancy claimed thy dream-thoughts 

In the fire-light's lusty glow ? 

Nay, 't is neither elves nor fairies, 
Searching golden thoughts to find, 

Mother Nature, with her sleep-wand, 
Round thy thoughts a web has twined. 



'89. 



SCIENTIFIC NOTES. 



The Dominion steamer "Alert" recently left 
Halifax, N. S., with men and material for the 
erection of a light-house, for the third time, on the 
west end of Sable Island. The rapid disappear- 
ance of this island is one of the present marvels of 
the North Atlantic. Its gradually lessening in ex- 
tent, and its existence at no distant day will be as 
great a mystery as the location of the mystic 
Atlanta. 

The approaching resignation of Dr. John B. 
Hamilton, surgeon-general of the marine hos- 
pital service, adds another to the frequent exam- 
ples of the difficulty of retaining the bright men of 
science in the public service. 

An electric carriage has just been made by 
Messrs. Immisch, of London, for the Sultan of 
Turkey. In appearance it does not differ from a 
four-wheeled dog-cart, with the shafts removed. 
The motor is placed in the centre of the cart. It 
is said to be propelled at the speed of ten miles 
an hour for five hours. 

The universal language, Volapiik, is slowly 
coming into use, but so slowly that some doubt 
remains whether ic will ever be universally adopt- 
ed. The study of such an artificial language is, 
in any case, an excellent mental discipline. The 
death of its inventor, Johann Martin Schleyts, is 
announced. 

Prof. Lewis Boss, of the Dudley Observatory, 
has completed calculations of the orbit of the new 
comet discovered by Prof. Barnard, at the Lick 
Observatory, Sept. 2. According to these calcu- 



lations, the comet is twice as far away from the 
earth as the sun. 



POLITICAL NOTES. 



Kansas is the banner Republican State of the 
Union. 

Boston appeared to take a great deal more 
interest in the recent municipal election than it 
did in the national election. 

The President-elect receives many letters from 
people in the South expressing solicitude regard- 
ing his probable policy toward that section, and 
there is reason for believing that the problem is 
being given more consideration by Gen. Harri- 
son at this time than the selection of a Cabinet, or 
anything else relating to the new administration. 

Sherman, Allison, Miller, and Wanamaker are 
the only names yet discussed by Gen. Harrison in 
connection with his Cabinet. 

During the past campaign Gen. Harrison has 
gathered quite a museum of relics and trinkets 
that have been given him. Among them is an 
interesting collection of about fifty, canes. One 
of these is made of 10,500 pieces of wood, some 
of the pieces being no larger than an ordinary 
nail-head. 

There are growing indications that the Demo- 
cratic conundrum, " Who will run Harrison ?" is 
easily answered. His name is Benjamin Harrison. 



MUSICAL NOTES. 

One day, when in Florence, Paganini jumped 
into a cab, gave orders to be driven to the theatre. 
The distance was not great, but he was late, and 
an enthusiastic audience was waiting to hear him 
perform the famous prayer of " Uloise " on a 
single string. " How much do I owe you ? " he 
inquired of the driver. " For you," said the man, 
who had recognized the great violinist, "the fare 
is ten francs." " What ! ten francs? you are cer- 
tainly jesting." "I am speaking seriously ; you 
charge as much for a place at your concert." 
Paganini was silent for a minute, and then, with 
a complacent glance at the rather too wily cab- 
man, he said, handing him at the same time a 
liberal fare, " I will pay you ten francs when you 
drive me upon one wheel ! " 



Lasell Leaves. 



55 



Miss Laura Moore, the first American girl to 
take the first prize in singing at the Paris Con- 
servatory, is at present in Chicago, where she is 
to appear in the " Lady or the Tiger." 

The authoress of " Rock-a-by Baby," Miss Eifie 
F. Canning, is a Boston girl, not yet out of her 
teens She is described as rather tall, very 
pretty, and in " every way musical." She is at 
present writing an operetta founded upon an old 
English legend. 

Music is a higher revelation than science and 
philosophy. — Beethoven. 

The first efforts of great musicians are worthy 
of notice. Haydn wrote short easy pieces for 
the harpsichord and country dances. Rossini 
commenced with a cantata. Handel, aged nine 
years, wrote church motets. Mozart, aged seven 
years, wrote two sonatas. Weber began at twelve 
years of age with short fugues for the piano. 



ART NOTES. 

Just four "Americans" — not all from the 
United States — exhibited in the Paris Salon of 
1881. In the Salon of the present year, the num- 
ber of exhibitors from the United States was one 
hundred and five, more than twice as many as 
belong to any other foreign country. It is main- 
tained, in addition, that works of considerable 
originality are more numerous among them than 
among the native samples. 

A number of Copleys has recently been added 
to the antiquarian collection that now enriches 
the walls of the Old State House in Boston, which 
has been turned into a museum for such relics. 

Hagenbeck, the dealer in wild beasts, of Ham- 
burg, has sent to Mme. Rosa Bonheur three pan- 
thers, and a keeper to take care of them, she 
having expressed a desire to make studies of the 
beasts. 

By the death of Frank Holl, the London Royal 
Academy loses one of its most vigorous portrait 
painters, and one of its most honored associates. 

Few artists are yet ready to exhibit their sum- 
mer work, but a large collection is promised for 
an informal exhibition at the St. Botolph Club 



early in the winter, and the house-warming of the 
new Commonwealth Club will probably see the 
best display that Boston artists can make. 

The main purpose of the new Society of Amer- 
ican Etchers is to elevate the art, and check the 
spirit of commercialism which dominates the art 
in this country. To counteract the evil of issuing 
unlimited "proofs," each impression of the plates 
issued by the society is stamped with its official 
seal, which tells how many copies are printed, 
and what number the particular copy in hand is. 



EXCHANGES. 



The days are now fast approaching when col- 
lege editors will lay aside their pens for a short 
time and postpone their interesting labors. 

Thanksgiving has come and gone, and with it 
nearly half of the college year, and this issue 
brings us to the pleasantest. thing about our school 
term — the Christmas holidays. Although we 
have noticed no weariness nor lack of excellence 
in our exchanges, yet, after the Christmas festivi- 
ties are passed, after our hosiery has all been well 
filled, and our Christmas pie devoured, undoubt- 
edly there will be a greater effusion of deep and 
thoughtful articles; for then the much-written- 
about foot-ball, base-ball, and other athletics will 
be a thing of the past, and no longer a fruitful 
subject; and the poets, having worn " The Sum- 
mer Girl " threadbare, and divested her of her last 
charms in the eyes of the public, will betake 
themselves to a more profound field. During the 
year fast drawing to a close, college journalism 
has made rapid progress. It is becoming an 
acknowledged factor in the literary life of our na- 
tion. For the year which is now the future, but 
which will all too soon be the present, let us not 
only maintain but elevate the standard to which 
we have attained. To all of our exchanges we 
extend our best wishes and compliments of the 
season. 

Many of our exchanges have no table of con- 
tents. This is a decided disadvantage to the 
reader, and causes him to waste much of his time 
searching for articles which he could readily find 
were the contents tabled. Moreover, he can see 
at a glance what the contents of the paper are, 



56 



Las ell Leaves. 



and decide, if he cannot command the time to 
give it a thorough reading, what articles will be 
most advantageous and interesting ; while, if 
this plan is not pursued, he needs must turn each 
page separately, and consume the time which 
might be used in the perusal of the journal, in 
finding out what there is to read. This fault is 
so easily remedied, and will benefit so many, that 
it seems that those wbo have not heretofore given 
it their attention might do so now, and act with 
profit upon the suggestion. 

The Crescent, the work of the pupils of the 
Hillhouse High School, of New Haven, is among 
our best exchanges. All of its departments are 
well conducted, and its arrangement is artistic, 
which cannot be said of every college journal. 

The editorial department of theSwathmore Phoe- 
nix for October is worthy of especial mention, as is 
also a well-written article, '• Maidens of Song," in 
the same number. .Swathmore has recently re- 
ceived large additions to its endowment fund, 
$ 1 60,000, divided equally among the chairs of 
history, Latin, engineering, and mathematics. We 
congratulate her. 

The Argosy has put on a new dress, that well 
becomes it, and has enlarged its space for literary 
matter. Its October number was exceedingly 
well made up, and betokens for it a successful 
year. A portrait and biography of the president 
of the university and the biographies of the class 
of '88 were a unique and exceptionally good 
feature of this issue. 

The Tuftonian, with much modesty, devotes 
its exchange columns entirely to clippings from 
other papers concerning itself. The love of ad- 
miration is common to all mankind ; but, judging 
from appearances, the Titftonian is possessed of a 
greater degree than is usual of this frailty. We 
had all read the aforesaid clippings in the original, 
and when we turned to the exchange column, 
hoping to find something fresh and interesting, 
what a disappointment we experienced. Save us 
from such a. fate in the future ! 

The Phillipian ot Nov. 10 was an extra, re- 
splendent with heavy type and crowing roosters, 
in honor of the great foot-ball game between 
Andover and Exeter, at which the Andover eagle 



of victory got her claw firmly upon Exeter, and 
no doubt (in their own minds, at least) it will 
never be removed. In this issue the advertise- 
ments were all relegated to the last page ; evi- 
dently, for once, their greed for gain was over- 
powered by the desire of improving this long- 
looked-for opportunity of sounding forth their own 
praises and celebrating a victory. 

To that extraordinary article in the North 
American Review entitled •' The Fast Set at Har- 
vard " both the Crimson and the Advocate have 
replied, through their editorial columns, in a man- 
ner both dignified and assertive. Indeed, in their 
short articles, even in a hasty perusal, one will 
find more good common-sense (a quality which, 
by the way, is somewhat passe in this progressive 
age) than he would in a more' careful and pro- 
longed study of Aleck Quest's remarkable produc- 
tion. If it were possible to bring to the notice of 
the public at large these journals, with their ably 
written and convincing replies to this malicious 
article, the effect of it would ceitainly be greatly 
palliated. And to those who have taken or who 
are contemplating taking this poisonous dose 
concocted by Aleck Quest, we would recommend 
as an antidote the Crimson and the Advocate. 



LEAP YEAR. 

They strolled beneath the maple's shade, 

The month it was July ; 
They thought it " just the place " out there 

To sit, and so did I. 

And as I got there first, you see, 
I thought 'twould not be rude 

To stay, so watched them unperceived, 
And this is what I viewed : 

A figure clad in creamy white, 

With sash of azure blue, 
A jaunty little tennis cap 

On curls of golden hue, 

Two little hands that smoothed the curls, 

A glitter of gold rings, 
Two feet that I could scarcely see, 

They were such tiny things. 

Another figure on the grass, 

Trying to get a light, 
A cigarette all nicely rolled, 

A dozen smoke rings white, 



Lasell Leaves. 



57 



A snowy stiff pique cravat, 

A collar most absurd. 
Now that I 've told you what I saw, 

I 'ir tell you what I heard : 

A gentle sigh, while two blue eyes 

Look into two of brown, 
Another sigh, and then, " What day 

Do you go back to town ? " 

A few long puffs, the brown eyes watch 
The smoke rings curl in air ; 

The answer comes indifferently, 
" I do not know nor care." 

A frown upon the snowy brow, — 
" Do throw that thing away : 

I 'm sure you 've smoked it long enough, 
Now hear what I 've to say. 

" You think I 'm nice, you know you do, 

I suit you to a T, 
And I am very fond of you, 

And think that you 'd suit me. 



VOUNG'S HOTEL 

RIIROPR 



EUROPEAN PLAN. 

OPPOSITE THE HEAD OF STATE STREET, BOSTON. 

Ladies' entrance. Court Street, near Washington Street. 

J. R- WHIPPLE, PROPRIETOR. 

J. N. LINDSAY & CO., 

STERLING SILVER^ REED & BARTON'S PLATED WARE, 

Also, Plating, Gilding and Repairing. 

421 WASHINGTON ST., BOSTON. 

GEO. II. WHITFORD. HENRY T. HARTWELL. 



G. H. HOPKINS S CO. 



SCHOOL, 



CHURCH AND 

—E^OPERA 

SEATINGS. 

31 Milk St., Boston, Mass. 



" Papa is rich, and he '11 allow 

The proper thing a year, 
And, coming to the point at once, 

Suppose we marry, dear ? " 

Now don't look frightened, gentlemen, 

I have not finished yet — 
'T was he that had the golden curls, 

And she the cigarette. 

Nan. 
Harvard Advocate. 



MRS. LINCOLN'S 

COOK BOOK 



THE BOSTON COOK BOOK Price, $2.00 

THE BOSTON SCHOOL KITCHEN TEXT-BOOK, " 1.00 

CARVING AND SERVING " 0.60 

THE PEERLESS COOK BOOK " 0.10 

Discount on the first three books to all who have been 

members of Lasell Seminary since September, 

1884. 
Address, 

IRS. D. A. LINCOLN - - WOLLASTON. MASS. 
McPAELIN'S 

CHINA PARLOR, 

39 FRANKLIN STREET, BOSTON, 

SPECIALTIES IN 

pine China and Cut QIass. 

OPEN ON NOV. 1, 1888, 

A Full Line of Novelties for 
GHRISTMHS, 

TO NP5W YORK nJSftsar 

FLARES REDUCED. 
I ALL RIVER LINE. 

Express trains, connecting with steamer at Fall 'River in 80 minutes, 
leave Boston from Old Colony station week days at 6 P.M., Sundays at 7 
P. M. Due in New York at about 7.30. A. M. Connection to Brooklyn 
and Jc rsey City by Annex Boat. 

Steamers PILGRIM and BRIS 1 OL in commission. Steam heat in 
staterooms. AN ORCHESTRA on each steamer throughout the year. 
Baggage checked from hotel or residence to destination. Returning, 
steamers leave New York daily, Sundays included. 

Tickets, staterooms, etc., secured at the line office, No. 3, Old State 
House, and at the Old Colony station. 
J. R. KENDRICK, GEO. L. CONNOR, 

General Manager. Gen'l Pass'r Agt. 

L. H. PALMER, Agt. 

3 Old State House. 




58 



Lasell Leaves. 



Allen Solly & Co.'s High-class 
Hosiery and Underwear, in the natural 
gray lamb's woo], white merino, and the famous 
brown, all weights and sizes, 28 to 50 inches, at 
Noye> Bros.' 

Blanket Wraps for the Nursery, the 
Bath, the Sick-room, or Steamer Travelling, 
for Men, Women, Children and the BaBy, at 
Noyhs Bros.' 

Morning and Evening Wedding 
Outfits, in Shirts, Collars, Cravats and 
Gloves, a specialty at Noyes Bros.' 

English Mackintosh Coats, for Ladies 
and Gentlemen, at Noyes Bros.' 

English Silk Umbrellas, in Gold, Silver 
and Natural Wood Handles, Ladies' and 
Men's, $2.75 to $35.00, very rare and choice 
designs, at Noyes Bros.' 

English Travelling Rugs, for Railway 
and Steamer Use, $3.75 to $50.00, at Noyes 
Bros.' 

English Dressing Gowns, Study 
Coats, House Coats and Office Coats, 
and Long Wraps, $5.00 to $45.00, in stock 
or to measure, at Noyes Bros.' 

NOYES BROS., 

Hosiers, Glovers and Shirt Makers, 

Washington and Summer Streets, 

BOSTON, U. S. A. 




Blanket Wraps for the Nursery, for the 
Sick-room, for the Bath, for Steamer Travelling, 
for the Railway Carriages, for Yachting, for Men, 
Women, Children and the Baby, at Noyes Bros.' 

Blanket Slippers for the Sick-room, the Bath 
or Dressing-room, for Men, Women and Children, 
at 75 cents per pair, at Noyes Bros.' 

English Holdalls, indispensable to Travellers, | 
at Noyes Bros.' 

New English Neck Wear, Collars, Cuffs 
and Dress Shirts, in every possible style and quality, 
at Noyes Bros.' 

Ladies' Silk Umbrellas in Fancy Colored 
Stripes. Plaids and Large Figures; new, stylish and 
desirable, at Noyes Bros.' 

The last London production in Ladies' English 
"Waterproofs are to be had at Noyes Bros.', 
$7.50 to $45.00 — just opened. 



DRESS SHIRTS 

For Weddings and Receptions. 

The present fashion of Shirts with Linen 
Cords, Embroidered Figures and Spot Bosoms, 
may be had of Noyes Bros., most thoroughly 
and elegantly made. 

We have a Special Department for Re- 
pairing Shirts, Hosiery, Underwear, Gloves, or 
any article belonging to Gentlemen; can be 
laundered and re; aired at short notice at 
Noyes Bros.' 

There are 81 offices in Boston who advertise 
Troy Laundry. Messrs. Noyes Bros. 
are the only house in Boston that actually 
send goods there. 

We send the work every day, and return in 
five days, and give new goods for any damaged. 

Special Laundry Department for 

Dress Shirts, Vests and Wash-Scarfs. Re- 
laundered equal to new goods at Noyes Bros." 

Family Laundry Work called for and 
returned with no extra charge. 

NOYES BROS., 

Hosiers, Glovers and Shirt Makers, 

Washington and Summer Streets, 

BOSTON, MASS., U. S. A. 



ESTABLISHED 1817. 



JOHN H. PRAY, SONS & CO. 

Importers. Jobbers, Retailers and Manufacturers' igents. 

Carpetings, Mattings, Oil Cloth, 

ORIENTAL R WO- 8, 

CARPETS AND UPHOLSTERY. 



558 and 560 Washington St., 

30 to 34 Harrison Ave. Extension, 



BOSTON. 



113 Worth Street 



NEW YORK. 



Las ell Leaves. 



59 



A. STOWELL & CO. 

24 Winter Street, Boston. 



£oirie of our Specialties : 

Bohemian Garnet Jewelry. 
Amber Beads and Ornaments. 
Tortoise-Shell Hair Pins. 
Choice Leather Goods. 
Oxidized Silver Jewelry, 
Fans for all occasions. 
Pearl Opera Glasses. 
Fine Gold Jewelry. 

Wedding Presents in Clocks, Vases and 
Bronzes. 

LATEST NOVELTIES IN ALL DEPARTMENTS. 
Lowest Prices. 



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YOUJSTO LADIES' 

OF ALL KINDS. 

THAYER, MCNEIL & HODGKINS, 

47 Temple Place, Boston. 

ARTHUR P. SCHMIDT & CO. 

IMPORTERS OF AND DEALERS IN 

FOREIGN AND AMERICAN 

Sheet Music. 

Sole Agents for Litolffs celebrated Edition ol 
Classical and Modern Music. 

13 and 15 West St., Boston. 

Catalogues sent free on application. 



BOSTON FOREIGN BOOK STORE, 

BOOKS IN ALL FOREIGN LANGUAGES. 

CARL. SCHOENHOF, 
144 Tremont Street - One FJight Up. 

HENRY W. GOODWIN. 
UNION CABINETS 

AND 

Perfection Roll Toilet Paper, 

BRYANT & MAY'S PARLOR, WAX AND SAFETY MATCHES. 

114 MILK STREET, 

BOSTON - - MHSS. 

Prices furnished upon application. 



H. H. NEWELL, 



DEALER IN 



Boots, Shoes and Rubbers. 

Repairing of all kinds Neatly and Promptly Done, 

POST OFFICE BUILDING - - AUBURN ST,, 

BOSTON. 

ESTABLISHED 840. 

Isaac Locke & Company, 

Produce Commission Merchants, 

And Dealers in 

FOREIGN and DOMESTIC FRUITS 

97, 99 and 101 Faneuil Hall Mattel, and Basement 18 Sontli Side, 

BOSTON - - - MASS. 

$$?• Telephone Connection. 



6o 



Lasell Leaves. 



^WEBER'S^ 



25, 27 TEMPLE PLACE 



BOSTON, 



AUNTTJ 33 WEST STREET, 

Ladies' and Gents' Restaurant, 

Oysters and Salads a Specialty. 

OPEN AFTER THEATRES. 

Caterer for Wedding Breakfasts, Lunches, Dinner and Evening Parties 

and Receptions. Also, Club Suppers at Short Notice 

and Reasonable Prices. 



s. 



W. BAILEY, 

DEALER IN 



WATCHES, JEWELRY, SILVERWARE, ETC. 

353 Washington St., Boston. (Up One Flight.) 

Jewelry Neatly Repaired. Also, Monograms on Coin Pieces. Personal 
Attention given to Repairing Fine Watches. 

ESTABLISHED 1847- 



AARON R. GAY & CO. 

ISTo. 122 State Street, Boston, 

STATIONERS 

AND 

BLANK BOO K MANUF ACTURERS. 

First-Class Account Books of any desired 
pattern made to order. 

S. S. GAY. EDWIN W. GAY 

JUST WHAT HAS BEEN WANTED, 

A LADIES' LUNCH ROOM 

HAS BEEN OPENED AT 

23 AVON STREET, BOSTON. 

A quiet, neat place, where a nice Lunch can be had at a very reason- 
able price. All the ladies say, " Is n't it nice ? " 

T. D. COOK, Caterer. 

ALSO, 

Wedding and otheT Parties 

Served with the Choicest Viands, and by Competent Waiters. 

SUPERIOR ICE-CREAM 

DELIVERED AT REASONABLE PRICES. 

two mijcjTjIoiw h.35j.a.:e>:e::e?.s 

Are a great many to claim for one publication, but it is un- 
doubtedly true that as many read The Youth's Companion 
every week. It has a world-wide reputation, and is sent all over 
the globe where the English language is spoken or read. The 
reason for its large circulation is found in its exceptional value. 
It is always safe, pure, entertaining, and instructive. Its influ- 
ence upon growing boys and girls can hardly be overestimated. 
It is remembered affectionately by their parents, who read it a 
generation, ago. We would call the attention of our readers 
to the Special Offer of the publishers, an opportunity which 
comes but once a year. Any new subscriber to The COM- 
PANION who will send $1.75 at once can have the paper free 
to Jan. 1, 1889, and for a full year from that date. This offer 
includes four holiday numbers, for Thanksgiving, Christmas, 
New Year's, and Easter, all the Illustrated Weekly Supple- 
ments, and the Annual Premium List with 500 illustrations. 
Address The Youth's Companion, Boston, Mass. 



FURS. 



IMPORTANT SUGGESTION, 



Furs to be altered and repaired 
will receive prompt and careful 
attention, with less expense, before 
cold weather crowds our furriers 
with work. Seals to be re-dyed 
should be sent to us at once. 

We are now receiving orders for 
our well-known superior seal gar- 
ments made to measure. 

Our Sealskins this season de- 
serve special mention for quality 
and richness, never before sur- 
passed. Patrons who place their 
orders with us early will appre- 
ciate this suggestion. 

JOS. J±. JACKSON, 

4-12 WASHINGTON ST., BOSTON. 



Established 1H25. 



NATHAN NE}AT & GO. 

MANUFACTURERS of 

-*^NS=-<«- Tfl 1ST T±] -^-^e*-*- 

TRUNKS Al TRAVELLING BAGS. 

BASKET TRUNKS AND STEAMER CHAIRS. 
Stateroom and Light- Weight Trunks for European Travel. 



SEND FOR ILLUSTRATED CATALOGUE. 



566 WASHI NGTON ST., BOST ON, MA SS. 

De Wolfe, Fiske & Co., 

. BOOKSELLERS, 
361 AND 365 WASHINGTON STREET. 



Mmi' Qlnnn \l/i QC1 I All the New Popular and Standard Books at 
m\) OlUlt), 111), 00 I, j lowest prices, Gift Books, Bibles, Albums, etc. 

ylW'lV Nn -!fi^ I Bargains in cheap editions, Second-hand and 
IWdlj 111), OUO, j paper-covered books, Juveniles, etc., etc. 

THE MOST COMPLETE BOOK-STORE IN BOSTON. 



Lasell Leaves. 



61 



Sieve, Crump & Low Co. 

432 WASHINGTON ST. 

BOSTON. 

y/ atcKes, ^ i amends, 
Q ewelr ij, 

finest (lottery. 



Eesigns furnished for Class Rings, Pins, Etc. 

A Fine Assortment of Choicest Stationery. 
Invitations, Cards and Programmes. 



W. H. FRENCH & CO. 

PLUMBERS, GAS FITTERS, 



AND ■ 



SANITAEY ENGINEERS. 

JUDSON'S BUILDING, 0PP. RAILROAD STATION, 

WEST NEWTON. 



All Work Promptly Attended to and Warranted Satisfactory. 

J. W. C0NR0Y & SON, 

HOUSE^SIGN PINTERS, 

WEST NEWTON, MASS. 

Chestnut St., near Depot. 

Residence, cor. Cherry and Derby Sts. 
glazier. work a specialty. 



THE "PEERLESS" FOUNTAIN PEN 




IS THE PERFECTION OF FOUNTAIN PENS. 

Is a hard rubber holder fitted with a 16 k. gold pen of the best manufacture, and will never wear out. It will write ten thousand words with one 
filling of ink, and for taking lectures, etc., it is indispensable. There is no loss of time in dipping ink as with the ordinary pen, as the " Peerless " 
has a perfect, even and uninterrupted flow of ink, and is the best fountain pen manufactured. Price, $2.00. 

The Cross Stylographic Pen, Stylographic Ink. All styles of Stylographic, Fountain, and Gold Pens repaired. 



THE CROSS PEN CO., 306 Washington St. 



BOSTON, MASS. 



UEST DOOE TO OLD SOtTTH CHT7ECH. 



QEO. IE. ALLEJ^, 


H. H. HUNT, 


12 Winter Street - - - - Boston. 


CARPENTER AND BUILDER, 


TRMINGS, BUTTONS, LACES, YARNS, CORSETS, 


WEST NEWTON, MASS. 


AND FANCY GOODS. 


Shop near R, R. Crossing. P. 0. Box 235. 




|®SEPH£iLLO?T'S 
93 STEEL* - P**^ ' 



THE FAVORITE NUMBERS, 303,404, 332,351, 170, 

AND HIS OTHER STYLES 

SOLD by ALL DEALERS throughout the WORLO 




62 



Lasell Leaves. 



C. H. CODMAN & CO. 

Photographic Material, 

PICTURE and FRAME DEALERS' 

<A SUPPLIES >> 
Wholesale and Retail Framing 

AMATEUR PHOTOGRAPHIC APPARATUS. 

34- BROMFIELD STREET, 

BOSTON - - - MASS. 

LIVERY, HACK, ' 



■Ajsnot- 



BOARDING STABLE. 



ESTABLISHED 1861. 



S. F. CATE, WEST NEWTON, 



Barge " City of Newton." 
Boat Sleigh "Snow Bird." 

HILL cSo O- © TV IE JCsT , 

(Successors to A. A. Kendall,) 

COMMISSION MERCHANTS and Dealers in 

FOREIGN AND DOMESTIC FRUITS AND PRODUCE, 

a. b. hill. Nos. 13 and 15 Merchants Row, BOSTON, c. s. gowen. 
HEJSTRY IYLA.IS, 

LADIES' HAIR DRESSER. 

Ladies' Hair Cut, Curled, and Shampooed in the most 

Artistic Manner. 

58 TEMPLE PLACE - - - BOSTON. 



FANCY GROCERIES A SPECIALTY- 



H. E. WOODBERRY, 

DEALER IN FINE GROCERIES, 

Cor. of Washington and Chestnut Sts,, West Newton, Mass. 



BRANCH AT AUBURNDALE. 



HALL or. COLE, 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 

FRUITS_andIVEGETABLES j 

100 and 102 Faneuil Hall market, Boston, 



C. J. LITTLEFIELD 3 

DEALER IN 

Fruits knd Produce, 

terms cash. No. 24 NORTH MARKET ST., BOSTON. 
D. WL. OLIVER & CO., 

DEALERS IN 

PORK, LARD, HAMS, BACON, 

Sausages, Tripe, Dried Beef, Beef Tongues, Bolognas, etc. 
26 Faneuil Hall, or Quincy Market - - BOSTON. 



HARRISON ;WAI. 



STEPHEN J. MOULTON. 



HARRISON SWAN & CO., 



DEALERS IN 



poultry apd U/ild Qa/i)e. 

l Faneuil Hall Market, 

BOSTOiSr. 

TELEPHONE CONNECTION. 

MILLS &. DEERING, 

recep'^rs and dealers in 

BUTTER, CHEESE nP EGGS, 

STALL 22, QUINCY MARKET, BOSTON. 
W. C. MILLS E. F. DEERING. 

JOffW ( P. SQUI<RE & CO., 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

ABSOLUTELY PURE LARD. 

21, 23, and 25 Faneuil Hall Market, Boston, Mass, 

J. KNOWLES <fc SONS, 
Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 

Fresh, Smoked and Pickled Fish, Oysters and Clams, 

Stalls 121 and 123 FANEUIL HALL MARKET. 

J. KNOWLEft. R. H. KNOWLES. J. A. KNOWLES. 



GEORGE E. RICHARDSON & CO., 



DEALERS IN • 



Foreign and Domestic Fruits, Produce, Nuts, 

Cigars, Tobacco, Etc. California Fruit a Specialty, 
No. 1 FANEUIL HALL SQUARE 
(Opposite South side of Faneuil Hall). 
Geo. E. Richardson. Frank E. Richardson. 

SLAYTON &o BOYNTON, 
COMMISSION MERCHANTS 

FOR THESALEOFGENERAL PRODUCE 

19 BLACKSTONE STREET, BOSTON. 



J. C. F. SLAYTON. 



TELEPHONE NO. 1761. 



W. W. BOYNTON. 



SPECTACLES 

MADE TO 
ORDER AND 
REPAIRED. 

L. J. Mc INTIRE, OPTICIAN, 




NO. 357 WASHINGTON ST.. 



BOSTON. 



Lasell Leaves. 



MRS. LflNGTRY„?»« 



Amateur Photography. Just 

HORSMAN'S No. 



ie4 from life with the " ECLIPSE." 03 
will bo giren aa a Souvenir with etch Outfit. 



One 



the Thing for Country or Seaside. 

3 ECLIPSE OUTFIT. 

m PRICE $10.00 




Camera makes a 
I Full Siza CABI- 
iiNET PHOTO- 
RAP H or view, 
siz* 4J$ by 6& in., 
and is provided 
with an attachment 
for making verti- 
cal or horizontal 
pictures. It con- 
sists of Polished 
Hardwood Camera 
with Folding Bed, 
Double Plate 
Holder, Fine Brass 
Mounted Lens 
wilh set of Stops, 
Fol ding Tripod, 
Carrying Case, 
Printing Frame, 
and Complete 
Chemical Outfit. 

1 Specimen Pho- 
tograph made with 
No. £ Outfit by 
mail on receipt 
of 10c. 

for sale BY THOMAS HALL, 19 Bromfleld Street, Boston, Mass. 

H. E. JOHNSON, D.D.S. 

DENTAL ROOMS, 

Office Hours, 8.30 a. m. to 5 p. m. 

ROBINSON'S BLOCK, WEST NEWTON, MASS. 

"PICKERING & GILBERT, 

Commission Merchants and Jobbers in 

BUTTER, CHEESE, EGGS, ETC. 

Stall, 89 Quincy Market, Boston. 
t. a. pickering. james gilbert. 

ALFRED BRUSH, 
APOTHECARY, 

Plummer's Block, Cor. of Auburn and Lexington Sts. 

auburndale. 

'88. MISS H. A. SPROUT, '88. 

DRESSMAKER, 

AUBURN STREET, AUBURNDALE. 

ELLIOT W. KEYES, 

APOTHECARY, 

Haskins' Block - - - Auburn Street, 
auburndale, mass. 

MRS. L_. COOK, 

DRESSMAKER 

Woodbine Street - - Auburndale. 
V. A. PLUTA, 

Dealer in PROVISIONS, 

Cor. Auburn and Lexington Streets. 

FARNUM &. COMPANY, 

PEODUOE COMMISSION MEBCHANTS, 

Wholesale Dealers in Apples, Potatoes, Cranberries, Onions, Peas, 
Beans, Dried Apples, Oranges and Lemons. 

rJos. 108 and no Faneuil Hall Market • • BOSTON. 

Henry Farnum. W. W. Lawrbnce. 



FROST & ADAMS, 

Importers or, and Wholesale and Retail Dealer* la 

ARTISTS' MATERIALS, 

decorative art novelties, art 
pottery, etc. 



Ebonized Panels. 

Winsor & Newton's Colors- 

German Colors. 

French Colors. 

Tucker & Green's Colors. 

Sketch Blocks. 

Plaques of all kinds. 

China Colors. 

Mirrors for Decorating. 

Artists' Boxes. 

Artists' Brushes. 

Artists' Canvas. 

Handbooks on Art. 

Studies of all kinds. 

Lustra Painting Materials. 



Water Colors. 

Bronzes. 

Brocades, 

Spangles. 

China for Decorating. 

Paper Panels. 

Tambourines. 

Repousse Materials. 

Canvas Stretched. 

Drawing Instruments. 

Plaque Rims. 

Artists' Easels. 

Drawing Paper. 

Materials for Tapestry, etc. 

Kensington Painting Materials 



Schools and Students Supplied at Low Figures, 

37 CORNHILL, BOSTON. 

SEND FOR A CATALOGUE. 
F. S. FROST. H. A. LAWRENCE. 

Geo. E. Johnson, 

dealer in 

HAY, GRAIN AND FEED, 

Lexington Street, Auburndale. 



NEAR depot. 



TELEPHONE 8150. 



CHARLES G. TINKHAM, 

Livery, M ami Boarflii Stie, 

Cor. of Lexington and Severn Sts., 
AUBURNDALE. 

JOHNSON & KEYES EXPRESS CO. 

GEO. E. JOHNSON, Prop. 

AUBURNDALE AND BOSTON. 

Office, Lexington St., Auburndale. Boston Office, 105 Arch St. and 
34 Court Sq. Boston Order Box, Bourne's Cellar, 13 F. H. Market. 

MOVING PIANOS AND FURNITURE A SPECIALTY. 

ALBEBT IF 1 . -WE,IC3-I3: , r, 
Successor to H. E. FLEMING, 

«• PHAEMACIST, *■ 

Near City Hall, West Newton. 
TELEPHONE. 



JANUARY, 1889. 




L/^ECC LEfufqs 



VOLUME XIM.-No. 4. 



CONTENTS. 



Editorials 6 5 

The Round-the- World Trip 67 

Old Girls 67 

A Fair Bandit 68 

A Word for Queen Mary 68 

Give the Boys a Chance 69 

Personals 69 

Death 71 



Marriages 
Locals 

Scientific Notes 
Political Notes 
Musical Notes 
Art Notes 
Exchanges 



Lasell Leaves. 



COBB, BATES & YERXA, 

IMF OR TJEJRS 



AND 



GROCERS 



Twenty-dollar orders delivered free at any station 
within 50 miles of Boston, and fifty-dollar orders at 
any station in New England, at our regular retail prices. 



COBB, BATES k YERXA, 

680 to 692 Washington Street, 
3 Bowdoin Square, 

6 and 8 Faneuil Hall Square. 

Alto in 

CHELSEA, FALL KIVER and TAUNTON. 



OUR SPECIALTIES. 

AMERICAN WATCHES, 
-^■DIAMONDS,*- 

Sterling Silver Ware, French Clocks and Bronzes, Fine 
Plated Ware, Jewelry and Fancy Goods. 

Designs and Estimates for Class Rings, Pins and Badges furnished 
without charge. 

N. G. WOOD &. SONS, 

467 WASHINGTON ST., BOSTON. 

LAWRENCE, WILDE & CO. 

Manufacturers of First-Class 

FURNITURE 



AND 



INTERIOR DECORATIONS, 

Nos. 38 to 48 Cornhill • - Boston. 



A. Lawrence. 
Wm. H. Hull. 



Geo. B. Darrow. 
F. D. Wilde. 



ESTABLISHED 1S30. 



ALFRED MUDGE & SON, 

PRINTERS, 

No. 24 FRANKLIN STREET, BOSTON, MASS. 

HAVE UNSURPASSED FACILITIES FOR 

BOOK AND MISCELLANEOUS PRINTING, 

ELECTROTYPING AND STEREOTYPING, 

MERCANTILE AND COMMERCIAL PRINTING, 

FANCY BALL AND SOCIETY PRINTING. 



LAW WORK A SPECIALTY. 

A FULL LINE OF WEDDING STATIONERY ENGRAVED OR PRINTED. 

WEDDING OUTFITS executed in the finest manner at reasonable prices. 

Information regarding work in any department will at all times be promptly furnished, either 
personally or by correspondence. 

ALFRED MUDGE & SON, 24 FRANKLIN STREET. 



Lasell Leaves. 



63 



COBB, ALDRICH & CO. 

WHOLESALE # RETAIL GROCERS, 



AND IMPORTERS AND RETAILERS OF 



The Finest Garden Teas. 

WE ARE THE ONLY HOUSE WHO RETAIL THE VERY 

Finest Garden Formosa, Japan and English Breakfast Teas, at 70 cts. per lb. 

Choice Teas in the different grades, ranging in price from 35c. to 60c. per lb. 

Use the " Diamond " Mocha and Java, the very best Coffee in the world, 32c. 11)., 3 lbs. for 95c. 

ALSO, THE LARGEST AND BEST ASSORTED STOCK OF 

Strictly First-class staple and Fauci Groceries, Canned Ms, Flour, Etc. 

to be found in New England. A handsome and convenient Catalogue of goods, with prices, issued 
monthly. Copies mailed to any address. 

Cobb, Aldrich & Co., 

722 to 732 Washington Street - BOSTON. 



T. E. MOSELEY & CO. 



DEALERS IN 



BOOTS, SHOES, RUBBERS, ETC. 

FOR LADIES, GENTLEMEN, BOYS, 
MISSES AND CHILDREN. 

A Large Assortment for 

YOUNG LHDIES. 



GYMNASIUM SHOES 

In Great Variety. 

ENGLISH LAST WALKING BOOTS, 

In CALF or GOAT, 
Are SENSIBLE, DURABLE, and REASONABLE in Price. 



T. E. MOSELEY & CO. 

469 Washington Street, 

BOSTON. 



GOOD THINGS MUSICAL FOR 1888, 1889. 

Whatever they are, the music to perform them, to understand 
them, to eDjoy them, will be found in the immense establishments of 

OLIVER DITSON St CO., who have on hand 

CONCERT SONGS, GOSPEL SONGS, SACRED SONGS, SCHOOL 
SONGS. SUNDAY SCHOOL SONGS, COMIC SONGS, COLLEGE 
SONGS, JUBILEE SONGS, POPULAR SONGS, CHOIR AND CON- 
GREGATIONAL MUSIC, TONIC-SOL-FA MUSIC, CATHOLIC 
MUSIC, ANTHEMS AND CHORUSES, PART-SONGS AND 
GLEES, OPERA, ORATORIO AND CANTATA MUSIC, COLLEC- 
TIONS OF MUSIC FOR PIANO, ORGAN, AND ALL OTHER 
INSTRUMENTS, AND IN FACT EVERY KIND OF MUSIC 
THAT IS MADE, 

All this is in the shape of Sheet Music (3,000,000 pieces), Octavo 
Music (3,000 kinds), or of music collected in well-bound books (4,000 
kinds). Send for Lists, Catalogues, Descriptions and Advice. Any 
book mailed for retail price. 

SOME OF THE NEWEST BOOKS ARE: 
PIANO CLASSICS, CLASSICAL PIANIST, YOUNG PEOPLE'S 
CLASSICS, SONG CLASSICS, Soprano j SONG CLASSICS, Alto 
and Bass ; CLASSIC TENOR SONGS. . Each $1.00, Very select 
and good music. 

Send the price of any book and receive it by return mail. The con- 
venience of this arrangement is appreciated by thousands of cus- 
tomers. 

OLIVER DITSON & CO., BOSTON. 
"CL IF 1 . ICIDIDY &d CO 

COAL. 

We furnish all the Coal used at " Lasell." 
C. K. EDDY & CO. 

WEST NEWTON, MASS 



6 4 



Lasell Leaves. 



LADIES' FINE FOOTWEAR. 



NOVELTIES 



IN 



We have added for Autumn and Winter, many new lines, in- 
cluding specialties of which we have exclusive control. 



GYMNASIUM SHOES, 
WEDDING AND PARTY 
BOOTS AND SLIPPERS. 



HENRY H. TUTTLE & CO. 

435 Washington Street, 
BOSTON. 



MILLINERY 



RECEIVED DAILY from PARIS and LONDON. 



Ladies are invited to call and examine before purchasing 
elsewhere. Correct Styles. Popular prices. 



HENRY M. BURR & CO. 

490 VSfashington Street, 

BOSTON. 




THE CLASS 






PHOTOGRAPHER 



e«ii „•■-» 



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For Lasell Seminary, 



— £ 



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Studio, ££ Winter $treet, 



BOSTON. 



LASELL LEAVES. 



DUX FEMINA FACTI. 



Volume XIII, LASELL SEMINARY, AUBUpDALE, MASS,, JANUARY, 1BB9. 



^umber 4, 



LASELL LEAVES. 

Published Monthly, during the School Year, 

BY THE 

Lasell Publishing Association 

OF 

LASELL SEMINARY FOR YOUNG WOMEN, 
Auburndale, Mass. 

Editor-in-Chief. 
EDITH IRVINA GALE, '89. 

, Business Manager. 

MAUDE OLIVER, '89. 

Local Editor. Exchange Editor. 

MARIE LUCILE WYARD, '91. MAI LOUISE SUTTON, '90. 



Political Editor. 
ROSA RIDGAWAY BEST. 

Musical Editor. 
NAN SMITH PEABODY, '91. 



Scientific Editor. 
AMY LOUISE HALL. 

Art Editor. 
NORA RACELLA GIBSON. 



Subscription Agent. 
ANNIE BLANCHE MERRILL. 



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Press of Alfred Madge &> Son, 24 Franklin St., Boston. 



" Full many a flower is born to blush unseen 
And waste its sweetness on the desert air." 

Oftentimes this couplet is read with a tone of 
regret, because the sweetness and freshness of a 
woodland flower must be unseen on account of its 
lonely haunts, and is for this reason thought to be 
of no use or good in the world. It should not be 
thus. It is a statement of a duty well performed, 
although no eye beholds it. Its sweetness is not 
wasted ; but it mingles with the common breath 
of nature, that refreshes some fevered brow and 
cools some excited brain. 

We were reminded of this couplet upon the 
advent of the new staff, because of our long ob- 
scurity. For many years we have avoided the 
highways to publicity with a remarkable persever- 
ance, and lately have even congratulated our- 
selves, that, now we are so near the end of our 
school life, there would be no further need of re- 
straining our footsteps, but we might spend the 
few remaining days of our existence here in 
school in unrestricted freedom. But, alas ! merce- 
nary bugbtars were on our track ; they followed 
us up ; they pushed our unsuspecting feet over a 
by-road to fame, right into the glare of this title- 
page, and wrote our names in unredeemable let- 
ters, there to shine for a few short weeks for their 
own special amusement, and then to droop and 
fade anywhere, they care not where. 

So, first of all, we would ask you to bear with 
us while we attempt to fill these pages with some- 
thing worthy of your notice. Dissertations on the 
principal topics of the day, such as " The Annex- 
ation of Canada," " The Future of the Prohibition 
Party," "Survival of the Fittest," and "Woman's 
Suffrage," are in order, a .d would be gladly re- 
ceived at this office. 

Several years ago, Lasell had among her chil- 
dren an authoress ; but her gift was not made 
public until the day she graduated. The Leaves 



66 



Lasell Leaves. 



never received any benefit from her pen, because 
she antedated it. But if there is any youthful 
authoress among us now, whose mind has a com- 
bination lock, we would be happy to have her 
presented to us ; and we would set about hunting 
up a key, in order that her brain might occasion- 
ally scatter ideas over our hitherto well-filled pages. 



Christmas has come and gone on swift wings 
and left behind an unusually full stocking. Among 
various other things too numerous to mention, it 
gave us an opportunity to compare our Christmas 
with that of the Slavs. 

Christmas in a Slav village has a purely religious 
character, and is celebrated as a sort of twelve- 
Jays' festival. In many villages, on the first 
evening, processions are formed, and the images 
of the Holy Virgin and St. Joseph are carried 
to the first home in the place, while hymns are 
sung by the inmates. The attendants of the 
saints ask a night's lodging. Those within in- 
quire who the travellers are, and so gradually the 
whole history of the nativity is told in Old World 
verse and music. Then the doors are thrown 
open, and all who are within kneel. The images 
are borne to the altar prepared for them, the two 
choruses join in a hymn of praise, and evening 
prayer begins in their presence. On the following 
afternoon the two saints are taken to the next 
house, and the scene is repeated. The peasants 
are evidently worshipping the true God after their 
own fashion. 

On the day set apart for devotion to the three 
Holy Kings, — the Wise Men of the East, — the 
three appear in full costume, — the one with his 
face conscientiously blacked, — with holy-water } 
and censers filled with burning incense. They 
bless all the rooms and stalls, and upon every 
door they make three crosses, in order to keep 
out Frau Perchta, which is the unhallowed and 
unhonored shade of the goddess whom heroes 
once worshipped as Freya. The crosses are treated 
with great respect, and what would happen to any 
one who should wilfully rub them out no one 
knows. Particularly devout persons often en- 
deavor to connect the crosses so that they form 
one of the names or symbols of our Saviour. If 
they succeed, it is a favorable omen. 



It is a universal belief among the Slavs that 
horses and cattle talk in human language with 
each other on the night between the 24th and 25th 
of December. But they also believe that no one 
can hear the animals talk unless he has on boots 
with nine soles, and with fern leaves in them. 

A large proportion of the people of America, 
during the weeks preceding Christmas, are en- 
gaged in preparing surprises for the household 
and friends on that day. Wherever the enjoy- 
ment of Christmas is known the preparations for 
good cheer are going on. What is to be remem- 
bered is, that it is not the rich who can give 
without feeling it, but the people in moderate cir- 
cumstances who give with discretion, and the very 
poor who give through sacrifice, that have joy in 
the act. It is the opening of hearts all around, 
that is the social key to the Christmas season. 

Notwithstanding this time of general benevo- 
lence, there is one phase of Christmas giving 
which detracts from all its other delectable enjoy- 
ments. It seems a shame that so much of the 
old sweet spirit has gone out of the Christmas 
season. Years and years ago, when our grand- 
mothers and grandfathers were young, they used 
to keep their simple Yule-tide with the tenderest 
and kindest of feelings. They exchanged their 
little gifts in the most unostentatious way, which, 
alas ! we have almost forgotten. Now, Christmas 
is nothing more nor less than a debt-and-credit 
account. We give only where we hope to receive 
in return. How often do we hear this sentiment 
expressed : " I shall not send her any gift what- 
ever this year. I sent her a lovely present last 
year, but she did not send me anything except a 
bare note of thanks." What a dreadful spirit this 
So out of harmony with the general exuber- 



1S 



ance of kindly feeling towards others ! No one 
seems entirely free from the popular belief that if 
he receives a gift he must give one in return, else 
he will be set down by his friends as a stingy sort 
of person ; rather than be thought stingy, he will 
stretch his purse strings to an unwarranted ex- 
tent. 

The baby is 'the only being in the great wide 
world who is exempt from Christmas taxation. 
His stocking may be filled to overflowing, and 
even the chimney-shelf may be filled up with the 
gifts of fond grandparents and maiden aunts, and 



Lasell Leaves. 



6 7 



no one will dream of any returns. His innocent 
little soul is filled with love for everybody, and 
if he could talk, no doubt he would say, "A merry 
Christmas to all, and happy cheer to every one! " 



GIRLS, PLEASE READ 

THIS! 

Over a thousand girls have been pupils at 
Lasell since the Leaves began. Over a thousand 
women, now out in the "cold, cold world," think 
tenderly and gratefully of the old school that did 
its best for them, whether that " best " was perfect 
or not. Don't you want to know what is going on 
at the old home nowadays ? Don't you wonder 
whether the girls can write better than you could ? 
Don't you want to know about the new things ? 
How would you know the " lists " were abolished 
if we had not sent you this copy ? Don't you 
want to help the Leaves ? You are willing, 
but it is a small matter, easily overlooked if put off. 
Many of you meant to subscribe last fall, but put 
it off and forgot it. Now, please do it this very 
day. Get a postal note for fifty cents, and send it 
to the Leaves or to me, or enclose stamps, — 
the new girls still buy a stamp now and then, — and 
we will send you the Leaves the rest of this year. 

Now, for once, let everybody respond. We 
want to know that we can talk to you through 
our paper. 

As ever, yours, 

C. C. B. 

N. B. — Don't forget to give any change in 
address or "condition " of yourself or any Lasell 
girls. 

P. S. — If you want to save trouble, put in one 
dollar and a half, the half for this, the dollar for 
next year ! ! ! 



THE ROUND-THE-WORLD TRIP. 

We have talked it over several times. Now I 'd 
like to know who is in earnest about it. I think 
I can go next year as well as any time. 



Note the plan, in the rough : Leave Auburndale 
about Oct. i, 1889, San Francisco, Oct. 15, giv- 
ing about a month each, on an average, to Japan, 
China, Ceylon and India, Egypt, Palestine, Asia 
Minor, Constantinople and Greece, reaching Italy 
about May T5 ; until June 1, in Italy or Sicily. I 
think I can guarantee the cost for the eight months 
to be not over $2,500. The company not to num- 
ber less then ten or twelve, besides Mrs. Bragdon 
and me. 

I should plan to personally reach Auburndale 
by June 10. Any wishing to spend the summer 
abroad would be placed in satisfactory care and 
'' personally conducted " by Mr. Shepherd prob- 
ably, through Europe, to arrive in New York or 
Boston by Sept. 1, for $600 more, or they could 
join other parties or friends. 

If we go, everything will be clone satisfactorily 

and thoroughly. Who will go ? I ought to decide 

by March 1. 

C. C. Bragdon. 



OLD GIRLS. 



One of the Lasell family recently in New York 
came suddenly upon Blanche Best, in company 
with Clara Comstock and her sister. It was in 
the Grand Central Station, and in the crowd and 
rush for trains little could be said, but all three 
seemed well and happy. Blanche was staying in 
the city, studying elocution, if one is not mistaken. 
The others were going to their home, in Provi- 
dence. The same traveller walking up Broadway, 
in pleasant chat with Louise Le Huray, met face 
to face the late Georgie Prickett, now Mrs. Bur- 
rowes, as smiling and gracious as ever. She is 
living in apartments in the city. Invited to a 
cosey lunch on West 61st Street, our Lasell woman 
found herself especially welcomed when her be- 
longings became known to the charming young 
hostess ; for was not this hostess once Miss 
Rosa Marritt, of Cleveland ? and did she not know 
Gertrude Penfield that was, and Mabel Clement 
that is, and the sister of Grace Spellmeyer, and 
had heard of a host more of Lasell girls ? — which 
latter part goes without saying. 

Knocking about in Boston, doing Christmas 
shopping, this roving Lasellian met with Martha 
Tash and her sister on Summer Street, and in an 



68 



Lasell Leaves. 



angle of a building that fended off the wind they 
held pleasant converse together. The result 
showed Martha to be well, rosy, and happy, at 
which all must rejoice. 

Mrs. Noble in a West End horse-car declared 
herself to have once been Mary Louise Gilling- 
ham, and was urged to come back to her alma 
mater, and establish her identity forthwith. There 
were others, later residents, who were nodding 
and bowing at a distance, till it seemed to this 
unsophisticated Lasellian that the people, former 
or latter, of her household, were almost ubiquitous. 



A FAIR BANDIT. 

Do you never stop to ponder 

On the error of your way ? 
On the hearts that you do pillage 

When you try us all to play ? 

Really, do you never think of 

All the torture we go through ? 
Have you never hours of anguish ? 

Hope you have — at least a few. 

They tell me scalps adorn your wigwam, 
Each warrior vanquished at first sight, 

Big and little, true and fickle, 
Armies of them every night. 

Zero is the point, they tell me, 

Indicated at your heart ; 
Let us hope a thaw may soften 

Even this ere you depart. 

Bret Rudder. 



A WORD FOR QUEEN MARY. 

Before we condemn Mary, the unfortunate Queen 
of Scots, let us glance at her life, and at the 
times in which she lived. She was born only a 
few days before the death of her father, during 
one of the most turbulent periods of Scottish 
history, and crowned at the age of two years. 

Many suitors sprang up for the hand of the 
child-queen, the chosen one being the Dauphin 
Francis. The betrothal was recognized on con- 
dition that Mary be educated in France, and 
brought up in the Catholic faith. Catholic Scot- 
land gave this innocent child into the hands of 
the perfidious instigator of the massacre of St. 
Bartholomew, who was to be her mother, her 



teacher, and her guide. But, despite the influence 
of the corrupt French court, she grew to be true, 
beautiful, and good. 

As a poet, musician, and linguist, she ranked 
among the first women of her time. At fifteen 
she was married, and at eighteen she returned, a 
widow, to find Scotland adhering to the Reformed 
Church. 

After a time, a second marriage began to be 
discussed. Elizabeth jealously watched the pro- 
ceedings, and finally, for reasons of her own, 
mentioned Darnley, the supposed husband and 
murderer of Amy Robsart. Mary mortally of- 
fended Elizabeth by preferring his cousin Henry, 
Lord Darnley. We need not go into the details 
of the marriage and death of Darnley; of Mary's 
marriage with his murderer, Bothwell; of the ven- 
geance of the people ; of BothwelPs flight, and of 
his death, twenty years later, declaring Mary inno- 
cent of the crime imputed to her. 

Mary, who was taken prisoner and conducted to 
Lochleven Castle, made her escape. Without 
hope from Scotland, she fled to England, where 
letters from Queen Elizabeth led her to expect 
the welcome due one sovereign to another. 
"Elizabeth adopted a policy indefinite, dissem- 
bling, caressing in speech, odious in action, which 
delivered up her sister by turns to hope and to 
despair, wearing out the heart of her rival by end- 
less longing, as if she had resolved that grief, 
anguish, and time should be her executioners. 
This queen, so great in genius, so mean in heart, 
so cruel in policy, and rendered more so by fem- 
inine jealousies, proved herself, in this instance, 
a worthy daughter of Henry VIII., all of whose 
passions were slaked in blood." She offered to 
Mary the castle of Carlisle, as a royal refuge, 
while in realily detaining her as a prisoner. She 
wrote that she could not with propriety treat her 
as "a queen and a sister" till she should clear- 
herself of the crime imputed to her. Elizabeth 
had no right to detain her in prison, as Mary was 
not an English subject, but a Scottish queen, and 
therefore did not come under English jurisdiction. 
The evidence upon which she was beheaded 
was false. It was based upon letters purported 
to be from Mary. When they were called for, 
nothing but a copy could be produced against her. 
Upon this false evidence, Mary was condemned 



Lasell Leaves. 



6 9 



and beheaded. The passions were Mary's judges ; 
therefore she was not fairly judged, nor will she 
ever be. Even if Mary had been guilty, the in- 
human duplicity of Elizabeth's policy would have 
justified all she did. 

Elizabeth, having mercilessly sacrificed the life 
of her whom she had so long and so unjustly 
retained in hopeless captivity, now added the most 
flagrant duplicity to her cruelty Denying, with 
many oaths, all intentions of having her own 
warrants carried into execution, she attempted to 
throw the entire odium on those who, in reality, 
had acted as the blind and devoted agents. This 
policy of the English queen was unsuccessful, 
however; posterity has with clear voice proclaimed 
her guilty of the blood of her royal sister, and 
the sanguinary stain will ever remain ineffaceable 
from the character of that otherwise great sover- 
eign. L. T. C, '89. 



GIVE THE BOYS A CHANCE. 

Every little while we find some article which 
pleads that the girls of the country may have 
more privileges, and the writer generally be- 
seeches the public to '• give the girls a chance." 
Now, we say, why not broaden the matter? The 
girls are not the only ones for whom our voice is 
raised. Why not give the boys a chance ? 

From time immemorial it has been the custom 
carefully to shield the girls from all danger, and 
from all contact with wrong and contamination, 
while the boys have been allowed to roam about 
at their own sweet will, and all their escapades 
have been condemned with a shake of the head 
and a repetition of those extremely trite sayings, 
"Oh! boys will be boys," and " Every boy must 
sow his wild oats." So, while the girls have been 
safely housed within convent walls, or within some 
seminary almost equally strict, the boys have been 
permitted to attend class or not as they saw fit, 
and to wander at the dictates of their own fancy. 
Now, we hold that this is unjust to the boys. 
Why should they not be shielded as carefully as 
their sisters ? Surely they are no better ; and if 
the systems now in vogue are beneficial to the 
girls, surely they might be to the boys as well ; or, 
so it seems to us. 

Imagine, if you can, the average boy, or young 



man, as .he would insist upon being called, under 
the same rules as those which govern his much-re- 
strained sister. Fancy him calmly seeking his room 
for quiet thought and meditation each Sunday after- 
noon, or picture him asking permission to go into 
town in order to do a little necessary shopping. 
Such a sensation as fifteen or twenty young men be- 
tween the ages of eighteen and twenty-two would 
create, if they were allowed to go into town only 
upon Monday afternoons, and then attended by 
some prudent chaperon! We laugh at the idea ; 
but why would it not be as much for their welfare 
as for that of the girls ? Both are human ; and it 
is the universal opinion that the girls are much 
the better of the two sexes ; then why should the 
boys be allowed to enter life in something of a 
"go-as-you-please race," instead of being guided 
and kept in the strait and narrow way ? We are 
anxious to know why it would not be wise, also, 
to restrict the correspondence list of the boy. 
Who thinks of allowing his daughter to correspond 
with every "Tom, Dick, and Hary"? Yet the son 
has no restraint placed upon him. His judgment, 
generally, is no better than that of the average 
girl ; yet he is a boy, and that fact seems to con- 
done everything. We hold that this treatment 
of the boy is most unjust. Why not give him to 
understand that " sowing wild oats" is not one of 
the most profitable branches of agriculture ? Why 
not raise in him a desire for that which is noble 
and good, not give him to believe that he has a 
special license to do as he pleases, simply be- 
cause he happens to have been born a boy ? If 
only boys could have a chance to be trained even 
as their sisters are trained, there would be not 
even the slightest foundation for such articles as 
"The Fast Set at Harvard" ; so we would most 
respectfully advance the question, why not give the 
boys a chance ? M. L. S , '90. 



PERSONALS. 

Mr. J. Gardner, secretary of the Board of 
Managers of East Greenwich Academy, and a rel- 
ative of Sophie Mason Dumas, visited Lasell re- 
cently, and seemed much interested in the special 
features of our seminary. He reports that East 
Greenwich Academy is soon to have improvements, 
made possible by a late endowment. 



7o 



Lasell Leaves. 



We learn that Aline Oglesby has been married 
to a Mr. Snyder, of Kansas City. 

Helen Underwood is visiting her sister in 
Omaha. 

Abbey L. Frost, who was a Lasell girl in '75, 
was married three years ago to Frank S. Kent, 
and now lives at No. 77 Delaware Street, Syra- 
cuse, N. Y. We hear she is a good wife, that she 
is much interested in Christian work, and has 
made many warm friends. 

Mamie Haskell sails for Europe this month for 
a three months' stay. 

Grace Sieburling, '87, has been visiting Jane 
Ninde, and Laura Munger spent Christmas with 
her. 

Maggie Waterhouse visited Maude Lutes be- 
fore the holidays. 

Helen Gilbert visited Washington during the 
holidays. 

Lizzie B. Burnham, '87, has Grace Siebur- 
ling's place in the laboratory, this year. She also 
takes a few " post " studies. 

Major Benyon sprained his ankle a little while 
ago. The Lasell Battalion extend their sincere 
sympathy. 

Capt. E. C. Whitney, who takes charge of 
the Lasell Battalion, has an enviable war record, 
having enlisted as a private in the Fifty-third 
Regiment Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, and 
in a year and a half having risen through all 
grades to acting adjutant of the regiment. He 
served in several battles on the staff of Gen. Kim- 
ball, commanding a brigade of the First Division 
Nineteenth Army Corps. After the close of the 
war he was made captain of Company E, in the 
famous " Massachusetts Sixth," what was left of 
those who " marched through Baltimore." He 
held his position for six years. He was tendered 
the major's post, being ranking captain, but was 
compelled to decline on account of the demands 
of business. It is a record to be proud of, and we 
are proud of it in him. 

Miss Cushman is back at Lasell, after her long 
holiday. We hope she will not find it necessary 
to take another one until June, at any rate. 



Miss Le Huray is spending a quiet winter 
at her home, in Summit, with an enviable oppor- 
tunity to read and study. She has had her eye on 
Georgia Prickett Burrowes, Miss Cushman, and 
various Lasellians in New York wanderings. 

A nice letter from Georgie Hatch Jones tells us 
many pleasant things about her two children, and 
also that she has received a photograph of Genie 
Converse Mattin's baby. The latter gives us an 
excellent illustration of how rapidly news travels 
among the girls. The honor lists were announced 
as abolished at Lasell, Dec. 19, and before Dec. 
28 the news had travelled to Brockton, then to 
Kansas City, Mo., and back to Auburndale. 

Fannie Dillraim has been spending the sum- 
mer in Denver, and we hear that she is the same 
old Fannie. 

Elizabeth Eddy, '88, visited Carrie Brown for 
a few days just preceding the Christmas holidays. 

It is whispered that Mabel Ramm is engaged to 
Sydney Littell, of Washington. 

Helen Thresher visited Miss Bragg, Dec. 15. 

Eula Lee visited Clara Bowen during the holi- 
days. 

Bess Harwood spent part of her vacation with 
Maude Vanhorn. 

May Church has returned from California, and 
is in her old home, Marshalltown, Iowa. 

Sara Pew paid her sister a visit before Christ- 
mas. 

Lil Campbell was a guest of Priscilla Parmen- 
ter in December. 

Indianapolis Lasellians please note that 
Alice Van Harlingen (Alice Dunsmore, '78) has 
moved to their village, and may be found at r74 
East New York Street. Make her welcome ! 
Alice reports her little girl as four years old, and 
well and strong ; herself, as not very strong, but 
pretty happy, and as anxious to hear from Lasel- 
lians of her day. 

Portland Lasellians note that Cora Dawes 
has come to stay with them a bit, to study music, 
and can be found, — I declare, I forgot to find 
out where she is to be found, — but you can learn, 
— in Portland, somewhere. Cora made Lasell a 
welcome call last week. 



Lasell Leaves. 



7i 



Ada Hibbard Crewe sends from her English 
home — Clifton, Bristol — her three dainty chil- 
dren in one precious picture. It is very welcome, 
and very nice, and she may well be proud. 

And so may Lottie Snell Simms two thirds as 
proud of her two, who sit lovingly side by side. 
Girls, we are very pleased to get even this distant 
acquaintance with your bright blessings. Let us 
have every one. Please send the grandchildren 
for the Lasell arms, — album, I should have said, 
— but I mean the other too. God help you to be 
wise mothers ! 

Mary Coe, '86, made a flying visit to her peo- 
ple, who are now living in Auburndale. She 
thinks the climate of Southern pines delightful, re- 
ports cases of wonderful cures it has effected, and 
calls for a branch Lasell in the pine groves of 
North Carolina. 

We will see. 

Lizzie Frost, of Galesburg, 111., made a visit 
in December to her brother in Topeka. If we 
had known in time we would have given her ad- 
dress to the Lasell girls in Topeka. They might 
have helped to make her stay pleasant. They 
would certainly have tried. 

Mrs. Jas. T. Bryant, of Worcester, accom- 
panied by Mrs. Bigelow, looked Lasell over dur- 
ing vacation. Were much delighted ; thought girls 
must be hard to please if they were not happy 
here ; wished their school-days were just begin- 
ning, and engaged a place for Miss Bryant for 
September, 1889. They report Edith Flint Bar- 
ber as about to move back to Fall River. 

Anita Henry Mirick, of Worcester, here in 
187 — something — reports herself still the proud 
owner of a good husband, — three children, — 
Florence and Richard (the former destined for 
Lasell), whose gentle faces are in the grandchil- 
dren album ; and George, the three-year-old baby, 
whose face is yet to come. — and a pleasant home 
at 130 Beacon Street, where she would be glad to 
see any Lasell faces. She is herself not very well, 
but improving in health, having been last winter 
at death's door. Her mother, and sister Nellie, 
here in '81, live at Santa Yuez, Cal., and like it 
well. 



Lizzie Whipple, '85, and her cousin, Mrs. 
Warren, of New Boston, N. H., made us a little 
call the first day of the vacation, inspected the 
premises, and booked Mrs. Warren's daughter for 
1889. Lizzie doesn't look a day older; is work- 
ing on German ; says her brother John has five 
"best" girls ; is coming to swim. She met Jen- 
nie Baker, of Buffalo (here from Warsaw), in New 
York lately, and found her the same Jen. Says 
Anna Baker Jebb has a darling six-month-old 
youngster, and has " settled down dreadfully," — 
whatever that means. 

Sophie Crandon, of Boston, here in '82, has 
spent the past two winters, and will probably 
pass this one, in the South. She covets the balmy 
air of frostless zones. When in Boston, she 
works at singing, which she much enjoys. She 
thinks the Lasell pin a good idea. 

In a recent number of the Carbondale Free 
Press we see the creditable mention of Ada L. 
Dunaway in connection with an art display, given 
under the auspices of the resident alumni of the 
Normal University. One of the beautiful pieces 
of China painting was from her brush. The works 
of art that received the most attention were the 
works in oil. One of these, — a painting on 
hard-wood, — executed by Ada, was pronounced 
excellent. 

DEATH. 

The many friends of Florence Bailey, '87, will 
be pained to learn that the holidays for her were 
saddened by the death of her father. Mr. Bailey 
was one of the leading citizens of Erie, Pa., and 
for many years cashier of the Marine National 
Bank. He was a man of excellent business habits 
and sterling integrity, quiet in his tastes, and fond 
of the home circle. The friends at Lasell ex- 
tend their heartfelt sympathy to Florence and her 
friends in this bereavement. 



MARRIED. 

Hattie M. Greenleaf, of Nashua, N. H., at 
Lasell in '87, was married Nov. 24 to George F. 
Smith, of the same city. Her future home will be 
No. 5 Granite Street, Nashua, N. H, 



72 



Lasell Leaves. 



At Wichita, Kansas, Jan. 9, Fannie W. Hans- 
come to Frederick W. Herbert. At home after 
Feb. 15, Denver, Col. 

Oct. 31, 1888, Mary E. Ward to Joseph W. 
Sterns. At home Wednesdays in December, 
Greenfield, Mass. 

At Newtonville, Dec. 13, Annie L. Briggs to 
F'ederick S. Sherman. At home Jan. 9 and 16, 
1889, corner of Watertown and Walnut Streets, 
Newtonville, Mass. 

At the Congregational Church, Warren, Mass., 
Dec. 27, Ida M. Sibley, of the class of '84, to 
Frederick S. Webber. At home Wednesdays, 
from Feb. 12 until March 6, — the Essex, Holyoke, 
Mass. 



A slow run to Warren, a carriage to the church, 
which was the most tastefully decorated wedding 
temple I ever saw, a half-hour's wait in the rap- 
idly-filling room, beguiled by good work on a good 
organ, and Mr. Webber came in from a side door, 
looking as if he appreciated the grave responsi- 
bility he was undertaking, while Ida walked 
gently but firmly up the left aisle, leaning on the 
arm of her brother-in-law, Mr. Fairbanks, who 
presently gave her away. Instead of obey, Ida 
said defend, which must have sounded odd to the 
man who had been led to suppose he was expected 
to do the defending. But Ida can do it. As 
they walked together down the right aisle Ida 
looked pleased, Frederick, serious. A little cy- 
clone of wind drove the plentiful rain upon some 
fine toilets, overturned the canopy at the door, 
and nearly overthrew some of the carriages which 
were taking guests to the cosey home of Emma 
Sibley Guilbert, where the reception was to be 
held, but a lively and delightful company minded 
not the weather, and gladly congratulated Mr. 
and Mrs. Webber on their new relation. Among 
the guests were eight Lasell girls, quite the galaxy 
of the evening, — Emma Sibley Guilbert, Ida 
Sibley Webber, Edith Flint Barker (who is soon 
to move to Fall River — it is hard to keep a Flint 
away from Fall River), Nellie Packard, Hattie 
Webber, Annie Wallace, Mabel Wetherell, and 
Agnes Fanning. We were glad to meet again 
Rev. Mr. Forbes, now of New York, who brought 



the Sibley girls to Lasell, and Mr. and Mrs. 
Strickland and the sister of our Minnie Strick- 
land, who, to our regret, was absent in Brooklyn, 
and Mr. and Mrs. Webber, whose faces were 
familiar from yore, Hattie's sister, and, last and 
least, the sweet little Susie, Emma's daughter, who 
did the honors of the house charmingly. How we 
did enjoy the glimpse of so many Lasell faces of 
former times ! A carriage kindly furnished took 
us quietly and comfortably through the wet and 
miry road to the station, three miles away, where 
we took the late train for home. On our way we 
had time to call on Anita Henry Merrill, in 
Worcester, whose bright, pleasant home and three 
fine children gave us much comfort. 



LOCALS. 
Happy New Year ! 

Lasell girls have commenced the new year by 
all being self-governed. 

Just back after the holidays. 
" What did you get for Christmas ? " 
'* Oh, I don't know ! Let me see : I got gar- 
ter clasps, a tortoise-shell hair-pin, bon — " 

" Bonbonniere, gold beads, and opera glasses." 
" Why, yes ! how did you know ? " 

A Lasell Seminary young woman (who has 
just been excused for being late for breakfast, tak- 
ing her place at French table, to her neighbor). — 
jfai en le cheval de nuit pendant presque tout lenuit. 

Can rosaline be used for any other purpose ex- 
cept that of tinting the finger nails ? 

(At French Table.) 

Girl No. 1 (to girl No. 2, who did not hear what 
had gone before). — Comment ? 

Girl No. 2 {much shocked). — Come off! How 
horribly slangy vous etes devenue pendant la vaca- 
tion, 'Mile. 

The new girls are Emeline Winnifred Brady, 
Muncie, Ind.; Jessie Siddall Bybee, Indianapolis, 
Ind. ; Ada Jones, Honolulu, H. I. ; and Anita 
Lyman Paine, Cambridgeport, Mass. 

Lost (by) B. C. — A Caesar. 

Why is door in the potential mood ? 
Because it is wood or should be. 



Lasell Leaves. 



73 



Mr. Shepherd certainly did himself credit, and 
gave us a most pleasant surprise, when we de- 
scended to the dining-room on Dec. 15 and found 
an attractive menu at each plate, letting us know 
that he had not, after all, forgotten the game din- 
ner, as some of us had begun to fear. 

The bowling alley is at last in working order, 
and Monday afternoon it will probably be filled to 
overflowing by girls anxious for more exercise than 
they can obtain by their daily walks and work in 
the gym. 

On the afternoon of Dec. 16 Mr. R. H. Barnum 
interested us greatly in "Woman's Missionary 
Work in Turkey." Mr. Barnum has a daughter 
at Lasell, and through her we have made valu- 
able additions to our collection of rare old coins. 

Under direction of Messrs. Davis and Hills, 
we were most pleasantly entertained on the even- 
ing of Dec. 17, by a concert given by their pupils. 
Although the weather was stormy the gymnasium 
was pretty well filled. The programme rendered 
was as follows : — 



pianoforte 



16. 



. Krause 
. Gerlitt 

Georges Rttpes 



Etude in A minor 
1 b. Tarantelle 

MISS OLIVER. 
S''NG. Do not Forget . .' . 

MISS GALE. 

PIANOFORTE QUARTETTE. Ojos Creolos . . Gottsckalk 

MISSES PEW, JOHNSON, COUTS, AND WILLIANS. 

SONG. Garonne Adams 

MISS M. SEIBERLING. 

PIANOFORTE. Agitato, Op. 65 . . . . Von Wilm 

MISS WARNOCK. 

CHORUS. The Holy Night Lassen 

ORPHEAN CLUB. 



VOCAL QUARTETTE. Estudiantina .... Lacome 

MISSES BARBOUR, PEABODY, SUTTON, AND GALE. 
AUTOHARP. Selections 

MRS. FLORENCE C SHERWOOD. 

CAVATINA from Cinq-Mars Gounod 

MISS BARBOUR. 
PIANOFORTE. Romanze from Pianoforte Concerto in D minor, 

Mozart 
MISS HARDING, Accompanied on a second pianoforte by MR. HILLS. 

Strelezki 
. Spohr 

MISS HOLLINGSWORTH. 
PIANOFORTE QUARTETTE. Overture . . . Keh Bila 
MISSES FOSTER,* OLIVER, NINDE, AND FULLER. 

CHORUS. Venetian Boat Song Blnmenthal 

ORPHEAN CLUB. 



SONCS \ a± ^ earest Heart, Farewell 

> b. Romanze from Zemire und Azor . 



Miss Foster's place was supplied by Mr Hills. 



Military drill is progressing finely. The bat- 
talion has been divided into companies, and there 
will be a medal awarded to the best company, 
and another to the best individual drilling. Work 
hard, girls ! 

Mrs. Florence Sherwood entertained us in 
the chapel on Friday, Jan. 4, by playing three 
solos on an autoharp. Prof. Bragdon offers this 
instrument to those who are still faithful to the 
banjo. 

A new version of the Beatitudes : — 

Blessed are the poor in spirit for they shall be 
comforted. 

Blessed are the merciful for they shall see God. 

Blessed are they that mourn for they shall in- 
herit the earth. 

Blessed are they who hunger and thirst after 
righteousness for they shall obtain mercy. 

The State Inspector of Public Buildings has 
been several times through our modest home, and 
on his last visit said that ours was the best 
equipped and appointed of any school building 
in the State. 

The nineteenth day of December, eighteen hun- 
dred and eighty-eight, will ever be a memorable 
one in the history of Lasell Seminary for Young 
Women. It witnessed what no true daughter of 
Lasell would ever have thought possible, the 
abolishment of the lists. Send forth the tidings, 
east, west, north, and south, to all those who, in 
former times, have haunted these classic halls, 
that the self-governed girl, the roll-of-honor 
maiden, and the crazy lassie are no more. Now 
we all stand on a common level, and enjoy what 
we have long counted a fair field and no favors. 
To be sure, the new plan presents some disad- 
vantages, — to those who have formerly been found 
in the ranks of the just and honorable ; but we 
have yet to hear of one outside of that number 
who is at all inconvenienced by it. We will now 
all walk at two, unless enjoying poor health, or 
are eloquent enough to persuade the teacher in 
charge, to that effect. If we are in need of five 
eighths of a yard of elastic, or a new tooth-brush, 
we can (without formal application and spending 
three quarters of an hour in expatiating upon and 
explaining this need) betake ourselves to the 



74 



Lasell Leaves, 



busy part of Auburndale. There we can make 
our own selections and satisfy our artistic taste. 
This is much more convenient than sending by 
Lewis, who was always sure to get the wrong 
color of elastic and a size too large in a tooth- 
brush. 

Anoiher marked improvement : we may now 
quench our thirst whenever it pleases us, — a lux- 
ury enjoyed before only by the famed few. Such 
a high degree of that estimable quality, self-con- 
trol, has been reached by us that study hours are 
no longer necessary to assist us in preparing our 
lessons, though it is still thought best to observe 
some hours during the morning and evening, 
simply as a guard, you know, against the intru- 
sion of the omnipresent girl. But from the mo- 
ment the town clock tolls forth the hour of two 
until the ringing of the chapel bell at a quarter 
past seven, the time is ours to do with what we 
will. 

Whether the plan will work wisely and well 
remains to be seen. However, it has our ap- 
proval, and we will endeavor to give it our best 
support. We wish it every success. Should it 
fail, let those with whom it originated comfort 
themselves with the assurance, "Variety is the 
spice of life," and remember that young people 
are fond of spice. Farewell, O ye list ! We 
cannot mourn you. You were too good for this 
earth. As the Lampooti says of the class of 
'92, so we can say to you: "Of such is the king- 
dom of heaven." 



SCIENTIFIC NOTES. 



Who are great astronomers ? The stars, be- 
cause they have studded the heavens for ages. 

The famous pear-tree planted in 1630 by Gov. 
Endicott, at Danvers, Mass., died recently, hav- 
ing reached the age of two hundred and fifty years. 

The Argentine Republic has ordered about 
thirty locomotives of various classes from the 
Baldwin Works. 

The observation of the total eclipse of the sun 
of Jan. 1, which was visible over a belt stretching 
from California to Manitoba, was favored by clear 
weather, and it is probable that results of great 
value have been obtained. 



Last December Major King happened to see 
two large fifteen-inch Dahlgren guns lying unused 
side by side in the dock. He immediately con- 
ceived the idea that a magnet of enormous power 
could be constructed by means of these cannon, 
with submarine cable wound about them. The 
experiment proved successful. The magnet, which 
stands about ten feet from the ground, is eighteen 
feet long, and has eight miles of cable wound 
about the upper part of the guns. Some faint 
idea of its power may be conceived from the fact 
that it takes a force of twenty-five thousand 
pounds to pull off the armature. The most in- 
teresting experiment was the test made of an 
American non-magnetic watch. It was held three 
feet from the magnet, and was immediately 
stopped. Another test was made with a number of 
carpenter's spikes. A spike was placed length- 
wise on the end of the magnet, then another 
spike was attached to the first, and so on until a 
line of them stood straight out from the magnet at 
least four feet in length. 



POLITICAL NOTES. 



Everybody ought to enjoy this festive season, 
for it has been a great year for Republican crops. 

A rumor is in the air that President Cleveland 
will deliver to Congress a message exclusively de- 
voted to civil-service reform. 

Germany is about to prosecute with vigor the 
war against the Arabs in East Africa. 

Mr. Thomas N. Hart is elected mayor of 
Boston by a large majority, and the 17,000 votes 
cast by the women for school committee secured 
the election of their candidates. 

The rejection of the government bill to aid the 
Panama Canal Company gives rise to a threaten 
ing agitation in France. 

The Indian Territory Convention at Baxter 
Springs, Kansas, favors the opening of the Terri 
tory to whites and the allotment of land to In- 
dians in severalty. 

The proposed Hungarian demonstration in 
favor of Pope Leo's restoration to temporal 
power is abandoned. 



Lasell Leaves. 



75 



Cleveland has appointed 137 known crim- 
inals to office, and so it is not alarming that he 
has nominated for the important position of con- 
sul on the Congo an ex-lieutenant of the navy 
who was dismissed from service only a short time 
ago for drunkenness. 

The Senate agrees to end the debate on the 
tariff bill Jan. 21, also provides for a holiday 
recess from Dec. 21 to Jan. 21. 

Among the most ridiculous of election bets was 
that made four years ago by John Shaw, of Sha- 
mokin, Pennsylvania, that he would never wear a 
coat again till a Republican President was elected. 
He was carried to the polls wrapped in blankets 
at the last election and died the next day. 

Mr. John Henniker Heaton, a member of the 
British Parliament, has accepted an invitation to 
visit the United States early this year. He ex- 
pects, while here, to have the honor of appear- 
ing before Congress in advocacy of ocean penny 
postage, and much of his time will be devoted to 
the furthering of cheap postage. 



MUSICAL NOTES. 



Rubinstein's " Demon " did not please Lon- 
don. 

The organ recital given by Mr. J. Wallace 
Goodrich, on Nov. 4, greatly pleased his large 
audience. The Newton press compliments highly 
all the participants. 

Russian opera has made a failure in England. 

It is said that J. J. Lyons, who wrote the 
music for "The Lady, or The Tiger," does not 
know a note of music, but writes by a system of 
figures. The deciphering of these hieroglyphics 
was the lot of Adolf Nowak, McCaull's director. 

Smoking concerts are quite popular in England. 

Sir Arthur Sullivan thinks the English peo- 
ple have much to learn from the Germans and 
the French, who are not guilty of rudeness in 
leaving the hall before the concert is finished. 

Prince Henry, brother of the German Em- 
peror, is a good amateur violinist. 



ART NOTES. 

" He is the greatest artist who has embodied, in 
the sum of his works, the greatest number of the 
greatest ideas." 

The Department of Greek and Roman Anti- 
quities, British Museum, has lately acquired a 
beautiful dress-pin of bronze, thickly coated with 
gold, ornamented with a group of doves about to 
drink from flowers, and bearing a dedication to 
Aphrodite. It is from the site of the Temple of 
Aphrodite, at Paphos, and presented to the trust- 
ees by the Cyprus Exploration Fund. 

As Director of the French School of Archaeol- 
ogy, at Rome, for six years, M. Geffroi has been 
appointed in place of M. Le Blant. 

It is credited that America has a one-fifth share 
in the twenty million dollars to which the com- 
merce in pictures in France has amounted to 
during the last ten years. 

The Boston artist, Paul Bartlett, who is now 
in Paris, has nearly completed his statue of the 
" Indian Dance." 

Alfred Stieglitz, of New York City, occupies 
a place in the foremost rank of the amateur pho- 
tographers of both hemispheres. At the Inter- 
national Exhibition of the Productions of Amateur 
Photographers, recently held in Vienna, he was 
awarded the large silver medal. 

Samuel Kitson, the New York sculptor, has 
completed his design for the monument to be 
erected over the grave of Gen. Sheridan, at Ar- 
lington. 



EXCHANGES. 

Upon entering the reading-room the other morn- 
ing we discovered the Harvard Advocate proudly 
occupying a pigeon-hole by itself, instead of being 
placed with the other exchanges. Naturally, our 
curiosity was fully aroused, and we decided to 
investigate. The words of the poet, " Why this 
thusness ? " were uppermost in our mind, and, with 
zeal "worthy of a better cause," we set to work 
to solve the mystery. Imagine our surprise when 
we discovered that the Advocate was occupying the 
place usually allotted to the Religious Herald; we 



7 6 



Lasell Leaves. 



are still unable to decide whether this was an illus- 
tration of the principle " opposites attract," or 
whether " birds of a feather flock together " 
would be more applicable. 

We fear if it were not for athletics and glee-club 
trips, the daily college journal would be obliged to 
adjourn sine die. 

As usual, much good reading may be found 
within the covers of the Nassau and Amherst 
Lifs. The book reviews in the former are espe- 
cially worthy of notice. 

Even the Ogontz Mosaic, a school-paper, with 
the Leaves right under its eye, spells us Lassel ! 
While the Wolfe Hall Banner goes even further 
than that, and speaks of us as the Tassel Leaves. 
What is the dreadful thing about our name that 
makes folks torture it so? The Magazine of Art, 
of Boston, gave us Lassell, and the last envelop 
brought it " Tovell." Why didn't we have a name 
that would spell itself ? 

We would suggest to the Troy Polytechnic that 
it devote a part of the department called "Poly- 
isms " to exchange notes. 

It is with feelings of the keenest pleasure that 
we find that the High School Bulletin, of Lawrence, 
Mass., so fully appreciates our exchange column ; 
however, we do not feel called upon to furnish ex- 
change notes for the entire scholastic world, with- 
out at least receiving some credit for the same ; 
and as we find upon looking over the above-men- 
tioned paper, two of our most cherished exchange 
notes adorning the exchange column, without so 
much as a " by your leave," our righteous indig- 
nation is somewhat inclined to soar. We can 
assure our friends in Lawrence that the life of an 
editor is, indeed, hard ; that it is no easy matter 
to write these items. It may be all very well to 
speak of the " little thing we dashed off this a. m.," 
but to do the dashing successfully requires some 
thought and application. The motto of our es- 
teemed contemporary, "Labor conquers all," 
seems to be disregarded by the present staff. We 
are perfectly willing to have our choice bits copied 
when due credit is given us, but we do seriously 
object to plagiarism. 

The article in the King"s College Record en- 
titled " Our Existence as Photographs " we found 



very good reading, and recommend it to those who 
are afflicted with melancholy. 

The Anchor for December contains some sound 
articles, but we trust they have no designs on our 
lives, as we were inclined to infer when we gazed 
on the dazzling blue type. 

The Christmas number of the Yale Courant 
presented an appearance more than usually at- 
tractive. What is better still, the appearance did 
not belie its contents, and we found the number 
most enjoyable. " The King's Jest " and " Coreen " 
especially were well worth reading. 

The editorial in the Sunbeam, from the Ontario 
Ladies' College, Whitby, upon, that much-vexed 
question, " Is Marriage a Failure ? " was admirably 
written, and worthy of much attention. It seemed 
to us that 'the Sunbeam started out in a manner 
almost too modest, for the article fully atoned 
for the ancientness of the subject, and we felt a 
sense of disappointment creeping over us that it, 
like all good things, at length came to an end. 

We had almost forgotten we ever had any child- 
hood, but the poem entitled " I 'm a Little Birdie," 
in the last issue of the Beacon, carried us back 
once more to the time when we were wont to pore 
over that "classic of the nursery, Mother Goose." 
This from a paper edited in the " Hub" is truly 
startling. 

The first number of the Collegian, the new 
magazine of the Intercollegiate Association, has 
appeared, and in every way meets the expectation 
of the college world. The first article is entitled 
" Harvard Reminiscences of Fifty Years Ago," 
by Edward Everett Hale, and an aspiring " Har- 
vard Junior " contributes a short sketch " From 
My Attic Windows." Besides these, there are, in 
the literary department, two stories, an essay, and 
several choice bits of verse. The editorial, eclec- 
tic, and athletic departments are all well sus- 
tained, and repay careful perusal. Under the 
Eclectic and Critical there are criticisms on the 
various college journals, and clippings from the 
exchanges. The February number will contain 
letters from foreign correspondents, and the last 
four pages of all subsequent numbers will be 
devoted to an extensive book review. 



Lasell Leaves. 



77 



Among the interesting specimens to be found in 
the College Museum is a diagram of the monkey, 
ascribed to a small boy by the name of Johnny. 
It runs as follows: — 

" A munky is a blame funny insek — he begins 
looking like people, but he runs the other en' too 
far out to remine you of his bein twins. You 
can't tell how menny feets he has cause he aint 
made up his mind yet whether his front feets is 
hands or feets and uses them both waze. When 
he smiles his feechers work hard enuff ' to pan out 
somethin' ginowine but the reel flavor don't seem 
to be fetched out. Monkey's hang onto a tree 

ESTABLISHED 1851. 



N. W. TURNER COMPANY, 

ARTISTIC 

GAS FIXTURES, 

Duplex Lamps, 

CHTJRCEL METAE WORK. 

27 and 29 Bromfield Street, 



BOSTOU. 



!^:kSE OTT 'i PR ° PRIETORS - 



G. H. HOPKINS S CO. 



SCHOOL, ^^ 

CHURCH AND 

—EEEOPERA 

SEATINGS. 

31 Milk St., Boston, Mass. 



like a grape vine but they's more meat to em. 
Monky's don't dress enuff to suit some fokes an 
besides thare close is made of such thin stuff that 
it wares off wen tha sit down." — Oberlin Review. 

The small boy, Johnny, seems very popular of 
late among college journals. First it was the 
Johnny of the Lampoon, whose untimely death we 
mourn, and now his Western relative appears upon 
the scene. 

MRS. LINCOLN'S 

COOK BOOK. 



THE BOSTON COOK BOOK Price, $2.00 

THE BOSTON SCHOOL KITCHEN TEXT-BOOK, " 1.00 

CARVING AND SERVING " 0.60 

THE PEERLESS COOK BOOK " 0.10 

Discount on the first three books to all who have been 
members of Lasell Seminary since September, 
1884. 
Address, 

MRS, D. A, LINCOLN - - WOLLASTON, MASS. 
McFAELIN'S 

CHINA PARLOR, 

39 FRANKLIN STREET, BOSTON, 

SPECIALTIES IN 

pine China and Cut QIass. 

OPEN ON NOV. 1, 1888, 

A Full Line of Novelties for 
GHRISTMHS. 

TO NJJW YORK bJSsSSS" 
FLARES REDUCED. 
1ALL RIVER LINE. 

Express trains, connecting with steamer at Fall River in 80 minutes, 
leave Boston from Old Colony station week days at 6 P. M., Sundays at 7 
P. M. Due in New York at about 7.30. A. M. Connection to Brooklyn 
and Jersey City by Annex Boat. 

Steamers PILGRIM and BRISTOL in commission. Steam heat in 
staterooms. AN ORCHESTRA on each steamer throughout the year. 
Baggage checked from hotel or residence to destination. Returning, 
steamers leave New York daily, Sundays included. 

Tickets, staterooms, etc., secured at the line office, No. 3, Old State 
House, and at the Old Colony station. 
J. R. KENDRICK, GEO. L. CONNOR, 

General Manager. Gen'l Pass'r Agt. 

L. H. PALMER, Agt. 

3 Old State House. 




78 



Lasell Leaves. 



Allen Solly & Co.'s High-class 
Hosiery and Underwear, in the natural 
gray lamb's wool, white merino, and the famous 
brown, all weights and sizes, 28 to 50 inches, at 
Noyej Bros.' 

Blanket Wraps for the Nursery, the 
Bath, the Sick-room, or Steamer Travelling, 
for Men, Women, Children and the Baby, at 
Noyes Bros.' 

Morning and Evening "Wedding 
Outfits, in Shirts, Collars, Cravats and 
Gloves, a specialty at Noyes Bros.' 

English Mackintosh Coats, for Ladies 
and Gentlemen, at Noyes Bros.' 

English Silk Umbrellas, in Gold, Silver 
and Natural Wood Handles, Ladies' and 
Men's, $2.75 to $35.00, very rare and choice 
designs, at Noyes Bros.' 

English Travelling Hugs, for Railway 
and Steamer Use, $3.75 to $50.00, at Noyes 
Bros.' 

English Dressing Gowns, Study 
Coats, House Coats and Office Coats, 
and Long Wraps, $5.00 to $45.00, in stock 
or to measure, at Noyes Bros.' 

NOYES BROS., 

Hosiers, Glovers and Shirt Makers, 

Washington and Summer Streets, 

BOSTON, U. S. A. 




Blanket Wraps for the Nursery, for the 
Sick-room, for the Bath, for Steamer Travelling, 
for the Railway Carriages, for Yachting, for Men, 
Women, Children and the Baby, at Noyes Bros.' 

Blanket Slippers for the Sick-room, the Bath 
or Dressing-room, for Men, Women and Children, 
at 75 cents per pair, at Noyes Bros.' 

English Holdalls, indispensable to Travellers, 
at Noyes Bros.' 

New English Neck Wear, Collars, Cuffs 
and Dress Shirts, in every possible style and quality, 
at Noyes Bros.' 

Ladies' Silk Umbrellas in Fancy Colored 
Stripes. Plaids and Large Figures; new, stylish and 
desirable, at Noyes Bros.' 

The last London production in Ladies' English 
Waterproofs are to be had at Noyes Bros.', 
$7.50 to $45.00 — just opened. 



DRESS SHIRTS 

For Weddings and Receptions. 

The present fashion of Shirts with Linen 
Cords, Embroidered Figures and Spot Bosoms, 
may be had of Noyes Bros., most thoroughly 
and elegantly made. 

We have a Special Department for Re- 
pairing Shirts, Hosiery, Underwear, Gloves, or 
any article belonging to Gentlemen; can be 
laundered and repaired at short notice at 
Noyes Bros.' 

There are 81 offices in Boston who advertise 
Troy Laundry. Messrs. Noyes Bros. 
are the only house in Boston that actually 
send goods there. 

We send the work every day, and return in 
five days, and give new goods for any damaged. 

Special Laundry Department for 

Dress Shirts, "Vests and Wash-Scarfs. Re 
laundered equal to new goods at Noyes Bros.' 

Family Laundry Work called for and 
returned with no extra charge. 

NOYES BROS., 

Hosiers, Glovers and Shirt Makers, 

Washington and Summer Streets, 

BOSTON, MASS., U. S. A. 



ESTABLISHED 1817. 



JOHN H. PRAY, SONS & CO. 

Importers. Jders, Retailers and Manufacturers' Agents. 

Carpetings, Mattings, Oil Cloth, 

ORIENTAL RUGS, 

CARPETS AND UPHOLSTERY. 



558 and 560 Washington St., 

30 to 34 Harrison Ave. Extension, 



BOSTON. 



113 Worth Street 



NEW YORK. 



Lasell Leaves. 



79 



A. STOWELL & CO. 

24 Winter Street, Boston. 



jSonte of our Specialties : 

Bohemian Garnet Jewelry. 

Amber Beads and Ornaments. 

Tortoise-Shell Hair Pins. 

Choice Leather Goods. 

Oxidized Silver Jewelry, 

Fans for all occasions. 

Pearl Opera Glasses. 

Fine Gold Jewelry. 

Wedding Presents in Clocks, Vases and 
Bronzes. 

LATEST NOVELTIES IN ALL DEPARTMENTS. 
Lowest Prices. 



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YOUNG LADIES' 

OF ALL KINDS. 

THAYER, MCNEIL & HODGKINS, 

47 Temple Place, Boston. 

ARTHUR P. SCHMIDT & CO. 

IMPORTERS OF AND DEALERS IN 

FOREIGN AND AMERICAN 

Sheet Music. 

Sole Agents lor Litolffs Celebrated Edition of 
Classical and Modern Music. 

13 and 15 West St., Boston. 

Catalogues sent free on application. 

BOSTON FOREIGN BOOK STORE, 

BOOKS IN ALL FOREIGN LANGUAGES. 

CARL SCHOENHOF, 
144 Tremont Street - One FJight Up. 

HENRY W. GOODWIN. 
UNION CABINETS 

AND 

Perfection Roll Toilet Paper, 

BRYANT & MAY'S PARLOR, WAX AND SAFETY MATCHES. 

114 MILK STREET, 

BOSTON - - 7VYMSS, 

Prices furnished upon application. 

H. H. NEWELL, 

DEALER IN 

Boots, Shoes and Rubbers. 

Repairing of all kinds Neatly and Promptly Done. 

POST OFFICE BUILDING - - AUBURN ST,, 

AUBURNDALB . 

ESTABLISHED IS^O- 

Isaac Locke & Company, 

Produce Commission Merchants, 

And Dealers in 

FOREIGN and DOMESTIC FRUITS 

97, 99 and 101 Fanenil Hall MarKet, and Basement 18 Soutli Side, 

BOSTON - - - MASS. 

Telephone Connection. 



8o 



Lasell Leaves. 



^WEBER'S^ 

25, 27 TEMPLE PLACE BOSTON, 

AND 33 WEST STREET, 

Ladies' and Gents' Restaurant, 

Oysters and Salads a Specialty. 

OPEN AFTER THEATRES. 

Caterer for Wedding Breakfasts, Lunches, Dinner and Evening Parties 

and Receptions. Also, Club Suppers at Short Notice 

and Reasonable Prices. 



S. "W. 



BAILEY, 

DEALER IN 



WATCHES, JEWELRY, SILVERWARE, ETC. 

353 Washington St., Boston. (Up One Flight.) 

Jewelry Neatly Repaired. Also, Monograms on Coin Pieces. Personal 
Attention given to Repairing Fine Watches. 

ESTABLISHED 1847- 



AARON R. GAY & CO. 

No. 122 State Street, Boston, 

STATIONERS 



■AND 



BLANK BOOK MANUFACTURERS, 



First-Class Account Books of any desired 
pattern made to order. 

S. S. GAY. EDWIN W. GAY. 

JUST WHAT HAS BEEN WANTED, 

A LADIES' LUNCH ROOM 

HAS BEEN OPENED AT 

23 AVON STREET, BOSTON. 

A quiet, neat place, where a nice Lunch can be had at a very reason- 
able price. All the ladies say, " Isn't it nice ? " 

T. D. COOK, Caterer. 

ALSO, 

Wedding and other Parties 

Served with the Choicest Viands, and by Competent Waiters. 

SUPERIOR ICE-CREAM 

DELIVERED AT REASONABLE PRICES. 



Y 



OUNG'S HOTEL.: 



EUROPEAN PLAN. 

OPPOSITE THE HEAD OF STATE STREET, BOST2N. 

Ladies' entrance, Court Street, near Washington Street. 

J. R. WHIPPLE, PROPRIETOR. 

J. N. LINDSAY & CO., 

STERLING SILVER^ REED & BARTON'S PLATED WARE, 

Also, Plating, Gilding and Repairing. 

421 WASHINGTON ST., BOSTON. 



GEO. H. WHITFORD. 



HENRY T. HARTWELL. 



FURS. 



IMPORTANT SUGGESTION. 

Furs to be altered and repaired 
will receive prompt and careful 
attention, with less expense, before 
cold weather crowds our furriers 
with work. Seals to be re-dyed 
should be sent to us at once. 

We are now receiving orders for 
our well-known superior seal gar- 
ments made to measure. 

Our Sealskins this season de- 
serve special mention for quality 
and richness, never before sur- 
passed. Patrons who place their 
orders with us early will appre- 
ciate this suggestion. 

Jos. A.. Jackson, 

412 WASHINGTON ST., BOSTON. 
Established 1825. 

NATHAN NE}AT & GO. 

MANUFACTURERS OF 







BASKET TRUNKS AND STEAMER CHAIRS. 
Stateroom and Light-Weight Trunks for European Travel. 



SEND FOR ILLUSTRATED CATALOGUE. 

^66 WASHINGTON ST., BOSTON, MASS. 

De Wolfe, Fiske & Co., 

BOOKSELLERS, 
361 AND 365 WASHINGTON STREET. 



¥nvti Qlnnn \L\ 9C1 I All the New Popular and Standard Books at 
llOW OlUIo, ill). 001. J lowest prices, Gift Books, Bibles, Albums, etc. 

AwWilV Afft ^Af\ I Bargains in cheap editions, Second-hand and 
iiluIlWd'l) llU. 000. J paper-covered books, Juveniles, etc., etc. 

THE MOST COMPLETE BOOK-STORE IN BOSTON. 



Las ell Leaves. 



81 



Shreve, Crump & Low Co. 

432 WASHINGTON ST. 

BOSTON. 

y/atcKes, ^ i amends, 
(j ewelr y, 

finest (rotte) 



U 



Designs furnished for Class Rings, Pins, Etc. 

A Fine Assortment of Choicest Stationery. 
Invitations, Cards and Programmes. 



W. H. FRENCH & CO. 

PLUMBERS, GAS FITTERS, 

AND 

SANITARY ENGINEERS, 

JUDSON'S BUILDING, OPP. RAILROAD STATION, 

WEST NEWTON. 



All Work Promptly Attended to and Warranted Satisfactory. 

I. W. C0NR0Y & SON, 

flOUSE^SIGN POINTERS, 

WEST NEWTON, MASS. 

Chestnut St., near Depot. 

Residence, cor. Cherry and Derby Sts. 
glazier work a specl'alty. 



THE "PEERLESS" FOUNTAIN PEN 




IS THE PERFECTION OF FOUNTAIN PENS. 

Is a hard rubber holder fitted with a 16 k. gold pen of the best manufacture, and will never wear out. It will write ten thousand words with one 
filling of ink, and for taking lectures, etc., it is indispensable. There is no loss of time in dipping ink as with the ordinary pen, as the " Peerless " 
has a perfect, even and uninterrupted How of ink, and is the best fountain pen manufactured. Price, S»2.00. 

The Cross Stylographic Fen, Stylographic Ink. All styles of Stylographic, Fountain, and Gold Pens repaired. 



THE CROSS PEN CO., 306 Washington St. 



BOSTON, MASS. 



:ht:e:k:t dooe rro olu south cia:"CTiaci3:. 



QEO*. _K3 
12 Winter Street 



.A. L L IE 3ST 

- - - Boston. 



BUTTONS, LACES, YARNS, CORSETS, 



, ««. .„„„, U..U..V,, ,,„„,v,, 

AND FANCY GOODS. 



H. H. HUNT, 

CARPENTER AND BUILDER, 

WEST NEWTON, MASS. 
Shop near R, R. Crossing. P. 0. Box 235. 



/ 



M. K. FORD'S 

ladies' Jjoot aridi5hoeljarlor, 

Room 59, Phillips Building, 

120 Tremont St, (cor. Hamilton place), Boston, Mass. 

Particular attention given to fitting tender and lame feet. 

Hand and Machine Sewed work at Reasonable Prices. 
Formerly with Ford &° McQtiads, t 

40 Temple Place. \ TAKE ELEVATOR. 

Boots to measure from $5.50 upwards. 



CONRAD'S 

Cloaks, Furs and Trimmings, 

Laces, Gloves, Small Wares, Buttons and Braids, 



35 Winter Street - 

Mail orders promptly attended to. 



Boston, Mass. 

Established 1852. 



82 



Lasell Leaves. 



C. H. CODMAN & CO. 

Photographic Material, 

PICTURE and FRAME DEALERS' 

<A SUPPLIES > 
Wholesale and Retail Framing 

AMATEUR PHOTOGRAPHIC APPARATUS. 

34- BROMFIELD STREET, 
BOSTON - - - MASS. 

LIVERY, HACK, 



■ .AJNTD. 



BOARDING STABLE. 

ESTABLISHED IS6I. 

S. F. CATE, WEST NEWTON, 



Barge " City of Newton." 

Boat Sleigh "Snow Bird." 

HILL &. G-0"WE1T, 
(Successors to A. A. Kendall,) 

COMMISSION MERCHANTS and Dealers in 

FOREIGN AND DOMESTIC FRUITS AND PRODUCE, 

a. b. hill. Nos. 13 and 15 Merchants Row, BOSTON, c. s. gowen. 

LADIES' HAIR DRESSER. 

Ladies' Hair Cut, Curled, and Shampooed in the most 

Artistic Manner. 

58 TEMPLE PLACE - - '- BOSTON. 

FANCY GROCERIES A SPECIALTY- — 



H. E. WOODBERRY, 

DEALER IN FINE GROCERIES, 

Oor, of "Washington and Chestnut Sts., West Newton, Mass. 

BRANCH AT AUBURNDALE. 

HRLL S COLE; 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 

FRUITSWVEGETABLES, 



130 and 102 Faneuil Hal 



C. J. LITTLEFIELD, 

DEALER IN 

Fruits knd Produce. 

terms cash. No. 24 NORTH MARKET ST., BOSTON. 
ID. Wl. OLIVER. & CO, 

DEALERS IN 

PORK, LARD, HAMS, BACON, 

Sausages, Tripe, Dried Beef, Beef Tongues, Bolognas, etc. 
26 Faneuil Hall, or Quincy Market - - BOSTON. 

HARRISON aWAN. STEPHEN J. MOULTON. 

HARRISON SWAN X CO., 

DEALERS IN 

poultry apd U/ild Qa/r^e. 

1 Faneuil Hall Market, 

BOSTON. 

TELEPHONE CONNECTION. 



MILLS &. Dl 



RING. 



RECEIVERS AND DEALERS IN 



BUTTER, CHEESE ^ EGGS, 

STALL 22, QUINCY MARKET, BOSTON. 
W. C. MILLS E. F. DEERING. 

JOHN <P. SQUI<RE & CO, 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

ABSOLUTELY PURE LARD. 

21, 23, and 25 Faneuil Hall Market, Boston, Mass, 

.T. KNOWLES & SOUSTS, 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 

Fresh, Smoked and Pickled Fish, Oysters and Ciams, 

Stalls 121 and 123 FANEUIL HALL MARKET, 

J. KNOWLES. R. H. KNOWLES. J. A. KNOWLES. 



GEORGE E. RICHARDSON & CO., 



DEALERS IN • 



Foreign and Domestic Fruits, Produce, Nuts, 

Cigars, Tobacco, Etc, California Fruit a Specialty, 
No. 1 FANEUIL HALL SQUARE 
(Opposite South side of Faneuil HallJ. 
Geo. E. Richardson. Frank E. Richardson. 

SLAY.TON So BOYNTON, 
COMMISSION MERCHANTS 

FOR THESALEOFGENERAL PRODUCE 

19 BLACKSTONE STREET, BOSTON. 



J. C. F. SLAYTON. 



TELEPHONE NO..I761. 



W. VV. BOYNTON. 




SPECTACLES 

MADE TO 
ORDER AND 
REPAIRED. 

L. J. Mc INTIRE, OPTICIAN, 



NO. 357 WASHINGTON ST.. 



BOSTON, 



Lasell Leaves. 



MRS. LANGTRY/MtSKSffc 



Amateur Photography. Just 

HORSMAN'S No, 



,-K.jed from liTa with tb* " ECLIP8B." rjt 
will be gjy»n as a . Souvenir with uaoh Outfit. 



On* 



tho Thing for Country or Seaside. 

3 ECLIPSE OUTFIT. 

PRICE $10.00 




Camera makes & 
Full SiZ3 CABI- 
NET PHOTO- 
GRAPH or view, 
siz«*"$ by 6J£ in., 
and is pre .'ided 
with an at t ac time n t 
for making verti- 
cal or horizontal 
pictures. It con- 
sists of Polished 
Hardwood Camera 
with Folding Bed, 
Double Plate 
Holder, Fine Brass 
Mounted Lens 
with set of Stops, 
Folding Tripod, 
Carrying Case, 
Printing Frame, 
and Complete 
Chcmicnl Outfit. 

1 Specimen Pho- 
tograph made with 
No. C Outfit by 
mail on receipt 
of lCc. 

too same by THOMAS HALL, 19 Bromfleld Street, Boston, Mass. 

H. E. JOHNSON, D.D. S. 

DENTAL ROOMS, 

Office Hours, 8.30 a. m, to S p. m. 

ROBINSON'S BLOCK, WEST NEWTON, MASS. 

PICKERING & GILBERT," 

Commission Merchants and Jobbers in 

BUTTER, CHEESE, EGGS, ETC. 

Stall, 89 Quincy Market, Boston. 

f. A. PICKERING. JAMES GILBERT. 

"ALFRED BRUSH, 
APOTHECARY, 

Plummer'S Block, Cor. of Auburn and Lexington Sts. 

auburndale. 

'88. MISS H. A. SPROUT, '88. 

DRESSMAKER, 

AUBURN STREET, AUBURNDALE. 

"ELLIOT W. KEYES, 

APOTHECARY, 

Haskins' Block - - - Auburn Street, 
auburndale, mass- 

~MRS. L.. COOK, 

DRESSMAKER 

Woodbine Street - - Auburndale. 
V. A. PL_UTA^~ 

Dealer in PROVISIONS, 

Cor. Auburn and Lexington Streets. 

FARNUM &TCOMPANY, 

PEODUOE COMMISSION MEEOHANTS, 

Wholesale Dealers in Apples, Potatoes, Cranberries, Onions, Peas, 
Beans, Dried Apples, Oranges and Lemons. «. 

tfoa. io8 and no Faneuil Hall Market • - BOSTON. 

Henry Farnum. W. W. LAWRiiNCK. 



FROST & ADAMS, 

Importers of, aad Wholesale and Retail Dealers In 

ARTISTS' MATERIALS, 

DECORATIVE ART NOVELTIES, ART 
POTTERY, ETC. 



Ebonizad Panels. 

Winsor& Newton's Colors, 

German Colors. 

French Colors. 

Tucker & Green's Colors. 

Sketch Blocks. 

Plaques of all kinds. 

China Colors. 

Mirrors for Decorating, 

Artists' Boxes. 

Artists' Brushes. 

Artists' Canvas. 

Handbooks on Art. 

Studies of all kinds. 

Lustra Painting Materials. 



Water Colors. 

Bronzes. 

Brocades, 

Spangles. 

China for Decorating. 

Paper Panels. 

Tambourines. 

Repousse Materials. 

Canvas Stretched. 

Drawing Instruments. 

Plaque Rims. 

Artists' Easels. 

Drawing Paper. 

Materials for Tapestry, etc. 

Kensington Painting Materials 



Schools and Students Supplied at Low Fipres, 

37 CORNHILL, BOSTON. 

SEND FOR A CATALOGUE. 
F. S. FROST. H. A. LAWRENCE. 

Geo. E. Johnson, 

DEALER IN 

HAY, GBAIN AND FEED, 

Lexington Street, Auburndale. 



NEAR DEPOT. 



TELEPHONE 8150. 



CHARLES G. TINKHAM, 

Livery, Ml Mi Boarding He, 

Cor. of Lexington and Severn Sts., 
AUBURNDALE. 

JOHNSON & KEYES EXPRESS CO. 

GEO. E. JOHNSON, Prop. 

AUBURNDALE AND BOSTON. 

Office, Lexington St., Auburndale. Boston Office, 105 Arch St. and 

34 Court Sq. Boston Order Box, Bourne's Cellar, 13 F. H. Market. 

MOVING PIANOS AND FURNITURE A SPECIALTT. 

ALBBBT IF. WBIGHT, 
Successor to H. E. FLEMING, 

•* PHAEMACI8T, *■ 

Near City Hall, West Newton. 
TELEPHONE. 



FEBRUARY, 1889. 




LflSECC LEfll/PS 



VOLUME XIU.-No. 5. 



CONTENTS. 



Editorials 85 

To Washington Again 87 

My Queen 88 

Men's Boots and Shoes 88 

Recollections of the Little White School-house . . 88 

Personals 9° 

Deaths 9 2 



Marriages 9 2 

Locals 9* 

Scientific Notes 94 

Political Notes 94 

Musical Notes 95 

Art Notes 95 

Exchanges 9*> 



W.--1.IWI 11^ m IIIJI 



Lasell Leaves. 



COBB, BATES & YERXA, 

IMP OR THUS 



AND 



GROCERS. 



Twenty-dollar orders delivered free at any station 
within 50 miles of Boston, and fifty-dollar orders at 
any station in New England, at our regular retail prices. 



OUR SPE CI ALTIES. 

AMERICAN WATCHES, 
-•DIAMONDS,^ 

Sterling Silver 'Ware, French Clocks and Bronzes, Fine 
Plated Ware, Jewelry and Fancy Goods. 

Designs and Estimates for Class Rings, Fins and Badges furnished 
without charge. 



COBB, BATES k YERXA, 

680 to 692 Washington Street, 
3 Bowdoin Square, 

6 and 8 Faneuil Hall Square. 

Alto in 

CHELSEA, FALL RIVER and TAUNTON. 



N. G. WOOD & SONS, 

467 WASHINGTON ST., BOSTON. 

LAWRENCE, WILDE & CO. 

Manufacturers of First-Class 

FURNITURE 



AND 



INTERIOR DECORATIONS, 

Nos. 38 to 48 Cornhill - - Boston. 



A. Lawrence. 
Wm. H. Hull. 



Geo. B. Darrow. 
F. D. Wilde. 



ESTABLISHED 1830. 



ALFRED MUDGE & SON, 

PRINTERS, 

No. 24 FRANKLIN STREET, BOSTON, MASS. 

HAVE UNSURPASSED FACILITIES FOR 

BOOK AND MISCELLANEOUS PRINTING, 

ELECTROTYPING AND STEREOTYPING, 

MERCANTILE AND COMMERCIAL PRINTING, 

FANCY BALL AND SOCIETY PRINTING. 



LAW WORK A SPECIALTY. 

A FULL LINE OF WEDDING STATIONERY ENGRAVED OR PRINTED. 

WEDDING OUTFITS executed in the finest manner at reasonable prices. 

Information regarding work in any department will at all times be promptly furnished, either 
personally or by correspondence. 

ALFRED MUDGE & SON, 24 FRANKLIN STREET. 



Lasell Leaves. 



83 



COBB, ALDRICH & CO. 

WHOLESALE # RETAIL GROCERS, 

AND IMPORTERS AND RETAILERS OF 

The Finest Garden Teas. 

WE ARE THE ONLY HOUSE WHO RETAIL THE VERY 

Finest Garden Formosa, Japan and English Breakfast Teas, at 70 cts. per lb. 

Choice Teas in the different grades, ranging in price from 35c. to 60c. per lb. 

Use the " Diamond " Mocha and Java, the very best Coffee in the world, 32c. 11)., 3 lbs. for 95c. 

ALSO, THE LARGEST AND BEST ASSORTED STOCK OF 

Strictly First-Glass Staple and Ftysg Groceries, Canned Goods, Flour, Etc. 

to be found in New England. A handsome and convenient Catalogue of goods, with prices, issued 
monthly. Copies mailed to any address. 

Cobb, Aldrich & Co., 

722 to 732 Washington Street - BOSTON. 



T. E. MOSELEY & CO. 



DEALERS IN 




, SHOES, RUBBERS, ETC. 



FOR LADIES, GENTLEMEN, BOYS, 
MISSES AND CHILDREN. 

A Large Assortment for 

YOUNG LHDIES, 



GYMNASIUM SHOES 

In Great Variety. 

ENGLISH LAST WALKING BOOTS, 

IN CALF OR GOAT, 
Are SENSIBLE, DURABLE, and REASONABLE in Price. 



T. E. MOSELEY & CO. 

469 Washington Street, 

BOSTON. 



GOOD THINGS MUSICAL FOR 1888, 1889. 

"Whatever they are, the music to perform them, to understand 
them, to enjoy them, will be found in the immense establishments of 

OLIVER DITSON St CO., who have on hand 

CONCERT SONGS, GOSPEL SONGS, SACRED SONGS, SCHOOL 
SONGS, SUNDAY SCHOOL SONGS, COMIC SONGS, COLLEGE 
SONGS, JUBILEE SONGS, POPULAR SONGS, CHOIR AND CON- 
GREGATIONAL MUSIC, TONIC-SOL-FA MUSIC, CATHOLIC 
MUSIC, ANTHEMS AND CHORUSES, PART-SONGS AND 
GLEES, OPERA, ORATORIO AND CANTATA MUSIC, COLLEC- 
TIONS OP MUSIC FOR PIANO, ORGAN, AND ALL OTHER 
INSTRUMENTS, AND IN FACT EVERY KIND OF MUSIC 
THAT IS MADE, 

All this is in the shape of Sheet Music (3,000,000 pieces), Octavo 
Music (3,000 kinds), or of music collected in well-bound books (4,000 
kinds). Send for Lists, Catalogues, Descriptions and Advice. Any 
book mailed for retail price. 

SOME OF THE NEWEST BOOKS ARE: 

PIANO CLASSICS, CLASSICAL PIANIST, YOUNG PEOPLE'S 
CLASSICS, SONG CLASSICS, Soprano | SONG CLASSICS, Alto 
and Bass ; CLASSIC TENOR SONGS. Each $1.00, Very select 
and good music. 

Send the price of auy book and receive it by return mail. The con- 
venience of this arrangement is appreciated by thousands of cus- 



tomers. 



OLIVER DITSON & CO., BOSTON. 



O IF 1 . E3D3D"Y" &c GO 

COAL. 

"We furnish all the Coal used at " Lasell." 
O. F\ EDDY & CO. 

WEST NEWTON, MASS 



8 4 



Lasell Leaves. 



LADIES' FINE FOOTWEAR. 



We have added for Autumn and Winter many new lines, in- 
cluding specialties of which we have exclusive control. 



GYMNASIUM SHOES, 
WEDDING AND PARTY 
BOOTS AND SLIPPERS. 



HENRY H. TUTTLE & CO. 

435 Washington Street, 
BOSTON. 



NOVELTIES 



IN 



MILLINERY 



RECEIVED DAILY from PARIS and LONDON. 



Ladies are invited to call and examine before purchasing 
elsewhere. Correct Styles. Popular prices. 



HENRY M. BURR & CO. 



490 V\fashington Street, 



BOSTON. 




ro 
H 



fe 



THE CLASS 



Cwly*?? 



PHOTOGRAPHER 



*-5<ii 2.«J-» 



«<" 



-s-f 



rfSsJZJ* 



For Lasell Seminary, 
-*'88*~ 



Studio, ^ Winter $ttetT, 



BOSTON. 



LASELL LEAVES. 



DUX FEMINA FACTI. 



Volume XIII. LASELL SEMINARY, AUBLipDALE, MASS,, FEBRUARY, 1BB3. 



dumber 5, 



LASELL LEAVES. 

Published Monthly, during the School Year, 

BY THE 

Lasell Publishing Association 

OF 

LASELL SEMINARY FOR YOUNG WOMEN, 
Auburndale, Mass. 

Editor-in- Ch ief. 
EDITH IRVINA GALE, "89. 

Business Manager. 
MAUDE OLIVER, '89. 

Local Editor. Exchange Editor. 

MARIE LUCILE WVARD, '91. MAI LOUISE SUTTON, '90. 



Political Editor. 
ROSA RIDGAWAY BEST. 

Musical Editor. 
NAN SMITH PEABODV, '91. 



Scientific Editor. 
AMY LOUISE HALL. 

Art Editor. 
NORA RACELLA GIBSON. 



Subscription Agent. 
ANNIE BLANCHE MERRILL 



TERMS, IN ADVANCE. 
One Copy, one year (including postage) 



Single Numbers 



#1.00 
15 cts. 



ADVERTISING RATES. 





SPACE. 


3 MONTHS. 


6 MONTHS. 


9 MONTHS. 


I-I2 


column .... 


$1.5° 


#2.50 


#3-5° 


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a 


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n 


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<£ 


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20.00 


I 


it 


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25.00 



Press 0/ Alfred Mudgc & Son, 24 Franklin St., Boston. 



The United States seems to be incurring dis- 
favor on all sides. Great Britain frowns on us 
because of the agitation concerning the annexation 
of Canada ; she also refuses to send us a minister 
since Sackville-West did not meet approval ; the 
French have a feeling of irritation against us, 
which seems to have been quieted a little since 
the issue of the recent political campaign was an- 
nounced ; the Haytians have recently imposed in- 
dignities on our ships ; and, latest of all, the Ger- 
mans at Samoa have taken a disliking to the Stars 
and Stripes and have rent them asunder. 

When we read accounts of the political affairs 
of our nation in the daily papers, how little do we 
as a body of young women realize the amount 
and importance of the machinery that conducts 
this Union ! Some of us were made more fully 
aware of our deficiency in this regard by the pre- 
liminary talk of Joseph Cook on Feb. 4, when he 
spoke of the factions that exercise power in the 
United States. How could we be expected to 
know the " ins and outs " of the government of 
our nation and its constituents, when we hear so 
little philosophical discussion on this subject ? To 
be sure, we learn the theory in our " Science of 
Government" and "Political Economy," etc.; but 
the mere theory and nothing more seems like 
committing formulae without discussion, or learn- 
ing the rule for cube root without s eing an ex- 
ample performed, to say nothing of doing it 
one's self. 

We hear often now from the platform that the 
twentieth century will be the "woman's century." 
If this statement is to be realized, we think it is 
high time that the rising generation of young 
women should be educated more deeply in the 
purlieus of the nation. Although the student of 
mathematics may never hope to be a navigator, it 
is a part of his education that he should under- 
stand how a ship is guided, 



86 



Lasell Leaves. 



Of all the lost arts, that of legible chirography 
leaves the most painful void. Penmanship, from 
its earliest use, was designed as a conveyance for 
thought ; but in the mad rush of the nineteenth 
century the vehicle of thought has been tipped 
over, and so much abused that it can hardly be 
said to serve its purpose at all times. The per- 
son who allows this loose, careless state of affairs 
in his handwriting is the recipient of invectives 
from all those who attempt to decipher it. 

The two most important demands on penman, 
ship are letter-writing and the writing of manu- 
script either for file or for the press. Nearly every 
one has known the embarrassment occasioned by 
his inability to decipher in his friend's letter the 
date or place of an appointment, the name of an 
anticipated caller, or perhaps the name of the 
latest novel. 

In writing articles for file, the necessity for a 
clear, legible hand is obvious. In writing articles 
for the press, one should be rigidly scrupulous as 
to the legibility ; for if words are not written 
legibly, a type-setter has ample excuse for all the 
mistakes he makes. But if the writing is not 
plain, just as easily as not can he change nothing 
into something, something into everything, Cumstock 
into cornstalk, and calm and collected into a clam in 
decollete. 

Those who are most lax in the flourish of a pen 
are not always the ones who are habitually lax in 
other things. Quite the contrary. We often find 
among the worst specimens of handwriting the 
selections which were written when the writer's 
eye was " in a fine frenzy rolling." Why is it that 
poor penmanship should be a failing not only of 
those in whom we would suspect indifference, but 
of those who are, in the main, painstaking ? 

Penmanship, as we said at first, is a conveyance 
for thought through the thoroughfare of sight. 
Now another way leads just as quickly, and a 
little more safely, to the mind, and this way is 
through sound. In accordance with this theory, 
the phonograph has been invented ; but as yet 
only used for exhibition. We hope it will soon 
be fully developed, and placed by quantities in the 
market. It will not be an expensive luxury, since 
it is long-enduring, and its only current expense is 
the rolls or phonograms to which the record of 
sounds is committed. The cost of the phono- 



grams is but little more than that of writing- 
paper. 

At present, the improvement sought for on this 
talking-machine is to arrange it so that it will halt 
after every ten words, in order that a person may 
dictate to it. This last is an improvement even 
on the primitive talking-machine, and is the first 
instance on record where machinery can do its 
work more satisfactorily than nature. 

When the phonograph begins its public life, 
papers, books, and magazines can be read into a 
phonograph and ground out again at pleasure. 
Speeches can be produced in the same manner, 
with the additional flavor of rhetorical phrasing. 
Concerts, and possibly operas, can be consumed 
by one of these machines, so that not only the 
masses who did not attend, but future posterity 
may have the opportunity of hearing an opera 
from the nineteehth-century stage. 

When this step in our civilization has been 
achieved, as we have every reason to expect it will 
be, our poor demoralized penmanship can take a 
long-needed vacation. Perhaps in the course of 
events, the proverb, " He who runs may read," 
will be converted into " He who runs may hear" ; 
but until the voice of the phonograph is heard 
more commonly in the land, we may as well favor 
the first version. 



Boarding-school girls, as well as college men, 
may be divided into three broad classes, — soci- 
ety people, grinds, and the great, undistinguished 
middle-class. In all " schools for young women " 
these three classes are represented, but both the 
society girls and the grinds are more in the minor- 
ity than is generally supposed. The society girls 
are those who come to college because their fa- 
thers wished it. Their all-prevailing thought is to 
get through, and to make the time behind their 
prison bars pass as gayly as may be. They are 
always general favorites, and, more often than 
not, prove valued additions to their class, for they 
have plenty of time for anything but study, and 
so upon them are thrust the social duties, which 
they discharge most gracefully. They act on 
committees, run the club, and are the general ex- 
ponents of the gospel of easy-going-ness. Once 
in a while a trained society girl finds her way into 



Lasell Leaves. 



87 



classic halls, thinking to rest for a while, and 
gather strength for fresh conquests in the social 
world. But the atmosphere is not congenial. 
There seems to be no place for her, and so, after 
astonishing the uninitiated by her perfect grace 
and polish, she goes back from whence she came. 

Then there are the grinds. They are those 
who are spurred on by a never-resting ambition, 
who think every moment of their college life 
should be devoted to cramming their minds with 
facts. At an unearthly hour in the morning their 
alarm-clocks sound forth, and awake their wrath- 
ful neighbors. Their heavy shawls and gossamer 
water-proofs keep the beams of the midnight oil 
from the prowling watchman and teacher in 
charge. Of all classes of students the grinds 
have the hardest time. They are envied or 
laughed at, but never liked. 

But the majority, the populace, are neither 
grinds nor society girls. They are the girls who at 
home, in some public school, have stood at the 
head of their classes, acquired a taste for study, 
and dreamed of a college career which should be 
brilliant, and sweep all before it. So, from all 
parts of the land they come, each displaying the 
badge of her State when she speaks. She soon 
finds that she now competes with picked minds, 
the leadership is not so easily gained as in the old 
school, and very often her conceit receives a cruel 
shock. She is rudely awakened to a clearer no- 
tion of her own ability ; but the awakening does 
her good. If she enters school determined in 
every way to make the most of her college life, 
she is sure of a liberal education. She should 
make study her chief end, but not alone the study 
of books. There are people all around her, and 
occupations in endless variety on every side. 
She may share in the social life and gain truer 
polish than any mere social training would ever 
give her ; and at the end of her four-years' course 
she will have begun to catch a glimpse of the true 
meaning of life. 

She will undoubtedly belong to a clique, for in 
all schools and colleges cliques exist in full force. 
Much might be said in their favor, more might be 
said against them, and perhaps the conclusion of 
the whole matter is that they are evil, but one 
that is absolutely necessary. No doubt these in- 
tense intimacies and exclusive sets are weakening 



and narrowing, but as long as the nature of young 
girls remains what it is, they will never be led to 
hold their one or two hundred school associates 
as friends all equally valuable and valued. These 
cliques obey no apparent law, nor can it be told 
when one forms and another decays ; but there is 
a constant change. There are at the present 
time cliques in schools that can be traced far 
back, always made up of girls similar in charac- 
ter, bearing the same reputation and exerting 
the same influence now as years ago, though the 
present members know not even the names of 
their predecessors. There is nothing premed- 
itated in these groups. Girls become estab- 
lished in these cliques in many ways. Some come 
heralded by alumnae sisters and cousins, and at 
once the friends of their friends interest them- 
selves in these girls. They are invited to join 
certain clubs, introduced to a certain set, and 
before they know it they are recognized members 
of a clique. Others come knowing no one, and 
known by no one. They are brilliant or pretty, 
and so receive numerous calls, and at once a cer- 
tain set see that they would make them a valu- 
able addition. If they are very attractive, other 
sets will recognize their value also. Numberless 
attentions and invitations will, for a time, be 
showered upon them, and they will be in danger of 
being completely spoiled. But as soon as they 
show a preference for some one set of these 
friends, their number suddenly lessens. 

Those whose views, aims, interests are similar, 
are attracted to one another, and, while the nar- 
rowing element must be admitted, it is still true 
that to "our set" are due many of the friend- 
ships that make our school life so pleasant, last- 
ing forever, a never-failing source of strength and 
happiness. 



TO WASHINGTON AGAIN. 



It is proposed to make another trip to Wash- 
ington during the spring vacation, April 17 to 
April 24, and the usual programme, which has 
proved so successful and interesting to all who 
have taken the excursion, will be carried out. A 
number have already given their names as desir- 
ing to go, and every assurance is given that this 



88 



Lasell Leaves. 



trip will be as delightful and instructive as the 
former have been. 

We are glad to have any of our old girls or 
their immediate friends join us. 
For full particulars address, 

Wm. T. Shepherd, 
Lasell Seminary, Auburndale, Mass. 



MY QUEEN. 

Each heart is the home 

Of an ideal queen, 
Be she named or unnamed, 

Be she seen or unseen. 

My heart owns the sway 

Of a magical muse, 
Whose charms with full bliss 

My spirits infuse. 

I find her in voices 
Of those passing by, 

I hear her in woodlands 
In the crooning wind's sigh. 

But nearest she seems 

And far dearest, too, 
When in strains from fair lips 

Her message comes true. 

The name of my Love — 
You 've heard her so long — 

Is that matchless wonder, 
The Muse of Song. 

My Love cannot fail me 
I have many years known. 

She will be dearer still 
When all else has flown ; 

For her birth was celestial, 
Her prestige divine ; 

Her mission the grandest 
Through ages of time. 



Z. 



MEN'S BOOTS AND SHOES. 

If this sign were to catch the eye of a passer- 
by there would immediately be pictured in his 
mind a completed boot, ready to be worn upon the 
most shapely foot. Of course, the picture pre- 
sented would differ according as the aspirations 
and social standing of the beholder were different. 

The society man would at once, in fancy, see a 
finely pointed patent-leather boot, or a well-pro- 
portioned Waukenphast, possibly accompanied by 
a pair of light gaiters. The hard-working mer 



chant or mechanic would have cast before his 
vision a broad boot, with common-sense toe, and 
a sole that would defy all weathers. And so we 
might enumerate until all the various grades and 
shapes were exhausted, but the picture would con- 
tinue to present a finished ideal. 

Far different is it with the man who has visited 
a manufactory where there is a maze of machin- 
ery and workmen. Little do we realize how many 
hands have been employed in the construction of 
this most necessary commodity. Even the shoe 
button claims an establishment of its own, where 
one finds that its primitive state is paper. 

Kangaroo and calf-skins are used in large quan- 
tities, but they undergo many cuttings and shap- 
ings before they are ready for use. Heels are 
made of raw leather as stiff as a board, which is 
cut into proper shapes by machines, five or six 
layers being pasted together. Some heels are 
made of pancakes, or exceedingly thin pieces of 
leather stuck together, and cut in proper shape. 

Many machines are employed in various kinds 
of stitching, cutting, and button-hole making. In 
the last process one person seated at an angle 
where two benches meet, may run two machines at 
once ; for, after it is started right, it proceeds to 
complete the button-hole without further attention. 

Thus it is that we know but little of the differ- 
ent kinds of labor which are combined to make a 
perfect whole. A man who understood the pro- 
cesses which all his garments had undergone 
would be wise enough to rank with the savants of 
the land. 

M. L. C, '88. 



RECOLLECTIONS OF THE LITTLE WHITE SCHOOL- 
HOUSE. 

To those who have been reared in large towns 
or cities, and have attended school in public 
buildings furnished with all the modern improve- 
ments, it might be interesting to have an intro- 
duction to a small white school-house in a little 
country village of the Granite State. It might be 
well to remark that the school-house to be de- 
scribed may be kept in mind as the typical one in 
any country village. 

The small, square, one-story building stands 
close by the roadside, with scarcely any yard, 



Lasell Leaves. 



8 9 



except what is divided off from the surrounding 
pasture by a brown board fence. On approaching 
the school-hoube, if the day is warm, one can see 
through the open doors the rows of hats and 
cloaks in the little entry, some tin dir.ner-pails in 
the corner, and on looking beyond into the larger 
main room, the rows of children's heads are seen 
bobbing this way and that in constant activity. 

Within the school-room, near the centre of the 
floor, stands a square stove, grown red with re- 
peated calefaction ; the floor is unpainted, and has 
some prominent spaces between the boards, which 
serve the purpose of keeping in a straight line the 
toes of each youngster when he stands in his 
class. The plastered walls are dingy, and bear 
ugly spots where frozen ink bottles might have 
burst and adhered. In some places there are 
large cracks in the plastering, with smaller ones 
leading from them in such a natural manner that 
the entire delineation might be used to represent 
to the juvenile minds the Amazon River. Even the 
delta at its mouth is represented by a spot from 
which the plaster has fallen. 

Facing the door are a score or more of desks, 
each with its accompanying bench, designed for 
two pupils. In the back of the room is a long 
bench, which is the place of honor, and is gener- 
ally occupied by the largest boys and girls. The 
benches on the side of the room are occupied by 
the A B C class. In the front of the room is a 
small platform on which are the teacher's desk and 
the dunce's stool, and overhanging all is the birch 
or ferrule, whichever has proved most enduring. 
The boys sit on one side of the room, and the girls 
on the other, unless some unruly boy has to be 
punished, and is made to sit on the "girls' side." 

The management of the school is strictly in ac- 
cordance with the method that has been used 
from " time immemorial." Lessons are recited by 
questions and answers. No word is ever given by 
way of explanation. Nothing is ever thought of, 
much less discussed, other than the matter that 
lies between the two covers of the text-book. 
Failu-e in lessons is punished by keeping the de- 
linquent after school to repeat his lesson, and, if 
the teacher is of the variety called strict, a flogging 
is administered. 

But let us turn to the privileges of the school- 
room, which are meted out with rigid impartiality. 



The younger children take turns in passing the 
writing-books. Two big boys are delegated in 
turns by the teacher to go to the brook after 
water. On the return of the boys, some pupil who 
has had especially good lessons on that day is privi- 
leged to pass the water to the rest of the scholars. 
It is also considered a privilege for a boy to lock 
up the school-house at night, and carry home the 
key ; but the one thus privileged must build the 
fire the following morning. Twice each week the 
names of two girls are read off" to sweep the school- 
room after school. 

Once each fortnight, an afternoon is devoted to 
exercises of a higher order than usual. Gener- 
ally parents and friends are invited ; but rarely 
does any one drop in, unless it is the " committee- 
man." If any one does present himself at any 
time of day, if only to get a scholar dismissed, his 
name goes down directly on the school register as 
a visitor. Well, as I was going to say, every 
other Friday afternoon, before recess, the ABC 
class puts its toes on one of the familiar cracks in 
the floor and spells the words it knows the best. 
The geography class bounds New Hampshire, 
and tells its capital. The Fourth Reader class is 
called up to read a piece it is perfectly familiar 
with; perhaps the Sixth Reader class — if any 
scholars are so far advanced — attempts the 
poem entitled " William Tell," or " Sir Peter and 
Lady Teazle " ; and the arithmetic class does the 
examples on the board that it has performed and 
explained a dozen times before. 

After recess comes the speaking of pieces and 
the reading of compositions. Just as sure as 
this eventful day comes round, the boy stands on 
the burning deck, the busy bee improves each 
shining hour, and Mary's little lamb doth appear. 
But the compositions, alas ! 

First, the four seasons are treated in devious 
ways. Some write on the seasons collectively, 
while other discuss them separately, in order that 
the four may furnish material for compositions 
during an entire term. If any one season receives 
more favor than another it is spring. Some girl 
with unusually advanced ideas attempts an essay 
on Flowers — giving the names of those she 
knows, and their color, and always stating which 
flower is her favorite. The majority of the schol- 
ars have written more than once on the subject, 



9o 



Lasell Leaves. 



"School." Here is a chance for a little variety 
of ideas, because the list of studies pursued by 
the writer is not in every case the same, and 
every scholar does not like exactly the same 
study. Sometimes an essayist makes some flat- 
tering comment on the teacher; but not often. 
Every composition, without exception, is read in a 
monotone, and with all the embatras peculiar to a 
district school. 

Such are the reminiscences of a school of ten 
years ago ; and ten years ago there was not a sus- 
picion in the mind of teacher or pupil but that the 
duty of each was fully discharged. 

E. I. G., '89. 



PERSONALS. 

Nellie Parkeu Lewis showed us her bright 
eyes last week. She has made a permanent home 
at Cohasset, where she and husband and that 
marvellous boy, with her mother and two brothers, 
make her quite a houseful to manage. . We are 
sure she does it well. 

Nellie Hughs Caldwell is also "reached" 
by the January appeal to the old girls, and re- 
sponds handsomely with the dollar and a half. 

Thank you, Nellie, we knew you had a heart 
somewhere within touch, or you had much 
changed. She has found Sue French Brown, but 
no other Omaha Lasellians as yet. But the rest 
of you Omaha Lasellians ought to find her, and 
not wait for her to find you. She is worth hunt- 
ing up. Mrs. V. B. Caldwell, 20th and Leaven- 
worth Slieets. 

Jessie Hill, Nellie Hugus says, is in Berlin, 
"still struggling with her German"; and it looks 
barely possible as if the German might get the 
better of it! Whew ! 

Rev. C. W. Bradlee, of Concord, N. H., spent 
a day or two looking through the school, in per- 
formance of his duty as official visitor from the 
New Hampshire Conference. 

Mr. Bradlee, though a young man, has filled 
with constant acceptability and great success 
leading charges in the Maine and New Hampshire 
Conferences, and is one of the " coming men" of 
our church. What he thought of Lasell he did 
not say. 



Fannie Hanscome Her — , how hard it is to 
say it! — Herbert, after three weeks' trial, an- 
nounces her decision that " marriage is not a 
failure," and her address is Box 2745, Denver, 
Col. 

The last new-comer is Miss Fannie Dunn, of 
Maine. Her brother, a graduate of Bates Col- 
lege, inspected Lasell, and in the name of the 
Bates College girls invited an athletic competi- 
tion, to which, doubtless, Lasell will be v ry ready. 

We are sorry to hear that Miss Daisy Lloyd, a 
former accomplished editor, has been confined to 
her room for some weeks, on account of exhaus- 
tion from caring for her father, who met with 
quite a serious accident. Both are improving. 

Lizzie Burnham spent the Christmas vacation 
with Clara White, New York City. She brings 
good news from Clara, who is enjoying herself at 
home this winter. One day was spent with Hat- 
tie Robbins Reeve, at her home in Brooklyn ; and 
one can readily see that Hattie is delighted with 
her lot. The three called on Lida Curtis, and 
found her as jolly and pleasant as ever. Of 
course, Lasell news was the topic of conversa- 
tion, of which there is always a plenty. 

A nice letter from Lillian Eddy tells us she is 
looking forward to a reunion of four members of 
" Octaginta octo" as Bertha Simpson, Mary Cole, 
and Lina Jones are soon to be in New Bedford. 

Louise Dietrick, here in '87, is attending 
school in Stamford, Conn. 

Jessie Law is teaching school at her home, and 
reports that she enjoys it very much. 

We hear that Ella Race is no longer on the in 
valid list. She has been keeping house during 
her mother's absence, and has been attending 
some of the "gayeties " of Decatur. 

Anna D. Phillips, who was a Lasell girl in 
1884, made us a flying visit Feb. 4. 

Our former pupil, Miss Hattie M. Webber, has 
not been neglecting her music, to judge from the 
programme of an organ recital held at Holyoke, 
Mass., on Jan. 23. Miss Webber was the sole 
assistant of the organist, singing among the 
selections one from the oratorio of " Elijah." Wish 
we could have heard her. 



Lasell Leaves. 



9* 



Mrs. Beekman E. Rouse, ne'e Elsie Jones, has 
a very pleasant home in Geneva, New York. 

Helen L. White's visit to Boston has been 
postponed on account of her mother's illness. 

Louise Richards is travelling with a party in 
Mexico. 

Lizzie and Florence Freeman have been vis- 
iting Maud Van Horn, Lockport. 

Annie Brown spent Sunday, Feb. 3, with 
Maude Oliver, '89. 

Lucy Mac Brier has just recovered from ty- 
phoid fever. 

Dr. Kent thoroughly believes in out-door exer- 
cise. And it is not all talk in her case, as only 
the other day she walked from Newton to Auburn- 
dale. 

Mrs. Charles E. Hillier (Mame Harmon) 
now lives at No. 285 West Chester Park, Boston. 

Miss Flora May Greenough wishes to an- 
nounce that she has taken up her residence in 
Providence, and is prepared to take orders for 
crayon and pastel portraits. Instruction given to 
a few pupils. Studio opened Tuesday and Friday 
at No. 47 George Street. 

Miss Rose, '86, visited Leah Couts, '89, in 
January. 

Isabelle Lombard spent a few days with Mat- 
tie Hall this month. She is going to Washing- 
ton, Old Point Comfort, and thence to Chicago, 
coming East again in June, in order to see the 
class of '89 take their "sheepskins." 

Miss A. P. Call entertained about twenty of 
the Lasell girls very pleasantly at her home on 
the evening of Feb. 2. 

Mary Cole and Bertha Simpson have been 
visiting Mary Hathaway. 

Sue Brown, '88, has been visiting Lil Eddy, 
'88, in New Bedford. 

Dr. Helen Pierce is much better than a year 
ago. 

The "Lasell Colony" at Norfolk College is 
"flourishing," and Miller Cassidy is the most con- 
spicuous of all in that flourish. 

Ada Langlky seems to be a great favorite 
among the young people of Norfolk. 



Miss Richardson and Miss Sheldon spent the 
holidays at Washington. 

Mandie Stone is living with her grandmother 
in New Hampshire. 

Mary Hathaway and Hattie Joy spent the 
summer in Duluth, where they were as happy as 
" S. G." after the " Lists " are read. 

Gussie Bente is at her home, in Hoboken, N. J., 
this winter. 

Irene Cushman is at her home, in Deadwood, 
Dakota, and reports that she has almost made up 
her mind to go round the world with the Lasell 
party. 

Unfortunately New Bedford was too far away 
to allow those who were favored with an invitation 
to Miss Eddy's " At Home," on Jan. 26 to "accept, 
even for the pleasure of meeting Miss Sue Brown ; 
but by waiting they saw her at Lasell. 

Miss Corey came back to us on Feb. 6. How 
glad we were to see her after her long illness ! 

Fannie Reed made us a short call Feb. 7. She 
is spending the winter in Dorchester, and is study- 
ing with Miss Call. Stay longer next time, 
Fannie. 

A nice letter from Mrs. Lou Hawley Sanders 
tells us how pleased she was to hear the " Lists " 
had been abolished. She finds much comfort in 
reading the Leaves, and looks back with pleasure 
upon the time she spent at Lasell. 

Annie Bushnell is spending the winter in Pen- 
sacola, Fla. She has been very ill with typhoid 
fever, but was gaining at the last report. 

The latest addition to the "grandchildren's " 
album is from Chicopee, Mass. : Ruth E. Cum- 
nock, two and a half years old in January : 
daughter of Lou Best, our whilom adorer of 
French houses at boarding-schools. Thanks, 
Lou. 

Some one recently visiting Mrs. Reed's school, 
in New York, found Georgia Prickett Burrowes 
busily engaged consoling her sister, who lately 
joined that school. Her " tear-bedewed " cheeks 
betray the fact that that early experience of many 
pupils — homesickness — does not confine its 
visits to modest schools like Lasell, but invades 
as well such "high-toned" ones as Mrs. Reed's. 



92 



Lasell Leaves. 



DEATHS. 

The Nunda News brings us the sad announce- 
ment of the death of Mrs. J. E. Mills, the mother 
of our Sarah. The sympaty of all Lasell friends 
is with the devoted daughter in her bereavement. 

Lillie Fuller Merriam has our sympathy in 
the loss of her father, who died suddenly of 
heart disease at Ellenville, N. Y., in January. 

It was odd that both her father and her hus- 
band's father died within six weeks of each other. 

" Gathering home." 



JOHN M. PHILLIPS, 



Senior Agent of the Book Concern of the M. E. Church. 



In the October number we voiced our sympathy 
with Ida Phillips on the death of her mother, Sept. 
18. Now we are called upon to mourn with her 
over the loss of her father, our dear friend, our 
well beloved counsellor of lang syne, who was 
taken hence Jan. 15. "How are the mighty fallen !" 
The strong man in his strength ! And what a 
tower of strength was this leader in Israel ! 
Sturdy, solid, unflinching in duty unselfish to a 
fault, if there be any such thing, even lavish of 
himself for others, faithful in all service, yet withal 
gentle as a child, unpretentious as God would 
have men be, a royal man, God's noblest work ! 

Many will miss him. The whole church will 
mourn him, but what a loss to his own, others can 
never tell. 

Well do we remember him in the old Cincinnati 
days, when he was our " peace-maker." How kind 
he was to us younger men ! How God's grace was 
magnified in him ! John M. Phillips has in all 
these years stood to us for what a Christian man 
ought to be. 

Dear Ida, we do mourn with you, but, thank 
God, in glorious hope. 

Those so long united in life are together for- 
ever, and we shall meet them there. 



* * 



MARRIED. 

At Spencer, Mass., Jan. 16, Ellen Prouty Starr 
to Chester Thomas Linley. 

At Houston, Texas, Jan. 24, Cora P. Morris to 



J. Alfred Early. At home after Feb. 1, No. 300 
North Fifth Street, Waco, Texas. 

At Terre Haute, Ind., Feb. 19, 1889, Eleanor 
Young to Francis T. Hord. 

The social event of the month in Wichita was 
the marriage, Jan. 10, of Fannie Hanscome to 
Mr. Frederick Herbert, of the Denver Water 
Works Company. The ceremony was solemnized 
in the Second Street Plymouth Congregational 
Church, according to the ritual of the Episcopal 
creed, and in the presence of a large number of 
invited guests. Nellie Ailing was maid of honor, 
and Jennie Brown and Lulu Wells, bridemaids. 
Mr. and Mrs. Herbert will make their future resi- 
dence in Denver. 



LOCALS. 

What next? A thriving daily reports one of 
our students as having arrived home for vacation 
from Laselles' Convent. 

Our attention was held very closely indeed on 
the evening of Jan. 10, by Rev. F. E. Wood, 
whose subject was Charlotte Corday. Indeed, 
it is not often that the calm, cool, and collected 
young women of Lasell Seminary are so com- 
pletely carried away, so to speak, as we were that 
evening. 

One of the Sophomores is so much interested 
in geometry that she actually tries to prove the 
triangles in the windows of the Congregational 
church equal, and is quite worried because she 
cannot tri-sect some of the arcs. 

Our lectures on Physiology continue ; so does 
our interest, which was stimulated on Jan. 10, 
18(89, when Dr. S. M. Perkins told us all about 
our hearts ; and we feel assured now that we can 
take good care of them, too. 

Judge J. C. Park, of Newton, talked to us on 
the afternoon of Jan. 17 on "Orators and Ora- 
tory." We always enjoy hearing him • the only 
fault we find is, that the time he devotes to us 
seems so very short. 

Some new electric fire-alarms have appeared in 
the halls during the past month. We suppose it 
will be only a question of time now until we have 
an engine house, engine, all complete, connected 
with the Seminary. 



Lasell Leaves. 



93 



During the month the school has been visited 
by a lady who graduated here in 1859. She had 
not been here since soon after her graduation, and 
was much interested ar.d delighted with the greatly 
increased dimensions of the buildings, and the ad- 
vanced facilities afforded. Her own room, in the 
old part of the building, remained unchanged, but 
for the most part she would not have recognized 
the school, which forty pupils then filled com- 
pletely. 

One of the Seniors was heard anxiously inquir- 
ing, " If we went around the world with Prof. 

, do you suppose we would have to learn a 

Bible verse every morning?" 

The swimming lessons have begun, but, for 
some unknown reason, we poor mortals who al- 
ready know how to swim, or those whose imagina- 
tion pictures, summer, the ocean, and a man as 
instructor (?) — these poor mortals, I say, are 
not allowed to witness the heroic efforts to 
keep above water of the novices in ihe art, but 
we hear encouraging reports, and no doubt before 
long there will exist a Lasell Life-Saving Station. 

Four bright and shining lights appeared around 
the centre table in the dining-room about two 
weeks ago, but suddenly disappeared. We nat- 
urally supposed they were removed because Mr. 
Shepherd thought that table brilliant enough al- 
ready. Imagine how rudely our conceit was re- 
duced when, upon inquiry, we were told that they 
had been taken away simply to have the other 
chandeliers made like these new ones. When 
they returned to stay this lime, it was noticeable 
that no remarks were made upon the subject, at 
least by that table. 

Two of the Pupils' Biweekly Recitals have 
taken place, — the first on the evening of Jan. 19, 
1889, and the second on the evening of Feb. 6. 
About twelve girls took part each time, and ac- 
quitted themselves well. The music was thor- 
oughly enjoyed by all ; and even those who will 
have to take part in the dim future have decided 
that these concerts will be very beneficial. 

During the past four weeks we have been deeply 
interested in a course of lectures by Dr. Shinn, of 
Newton. The subject is " Modern Fiction and 
Real Life." This is divided into four parts. On 



Jan. 24 we had the first, "Are the Views and 
Principles Gained from the Popular Novel always 
Safe ? " The second on Jan. 31, " Are the Heroes 
and Heroines in Modern Fiction Good Examples ?" 
The third, Feb. 7, "What about the After-life of 
these Heroes and Heroines ?" And the last, on 
Feb. 14, " Some Obligations in Real Life." 

One old girl writes as follows : " I have been 
feeling ashamed of myself to-night, just as if I had 
been called into the ' office,' and all because of 
that little paragraph in' the Leaves. It hit me, of 
course. I have not subscribed, and for such a 
silly reason ! It has happened every month some 
one has sent the paper to me. Every time, I 
would think, now I will send my dollar right off, 
and before I knew it in would come another 
copy of the Leaves. I think any one who was 
so interested in the paper should have behaved 
very differently; so now I have apologized and 
subscribed." 

Rev. F. E. Clark and Miss Elizabeth D. Hans- 
com, of Christian Endeavor fame, spoke to us 
very interestingly in the afternoon of the day of 
prayer for schools and colleges. After the meet- 
ing, a society was formed, with the following 
officers : — 

President Miss Burn ham 

Vice-President Miss Havens 

Secretary Miss Day 

Corresponding Secretary Miss Merrill 

Treasurer Miss CLEMENT 

LOOKOUT COMMITTEE. 

Miss Matthews, Miss JKarwell, 

Miss Blaisdell, Mrss A. Hall. 

Miss Boyce, 

musical committee. 
Miss Gale, Miss Brown, Miss Hollingsworth. 

temperance committee. 
Miss M. Packard, Miss Skinner, 

Miss Boyce, Miss Clement. 

missionary committee. 
Miss Gale, Miss Commins, 

Miss Hogg, Miss Packard. 

prayer-meeting committee. 
Miss Brown, Miss Matthews, Miss Corey. 

On Sunday, Feb. 10, a union meeting of the 
Missionary and Temperance societies was held in 
the chapel. A paper was prepared on '• The Re- 
lation between Temperance Work and Missions," 



94 



Lasell Leaves. 



by Miss Havens ; also a paper on " Intoxicating 
Drinks in all Lands," by Miss Foster. An ex- 
ceedingly interesting description of Miss Leavitt's 
work in connection with the world's W. C. T. U. 
was given by Miss Packard. A letter from Miss 
Ogden concerning Christian life and temperance 
work in the Puebla school was read by Miss 
Staley, and the poem, "Whom Shall I Send?" 
was read by Miss Burnham. 

The class of '91 has at last decided upon its 
color and motto. The class being unusually large, 
the discussions have been .proportionately ani- 
mated. The issue of all this is : color, shamrock 
green ; class motto, " Nous y arriverons tout 
meme." The roll-call numbers two at present. 

Mr. Edward G. Blaisdell will please accept 
our sincere tribute to his heroism in rescuing 
Howard Lee from drowning. We were glad to 
hear his praises from the lips of the small boys 
who saw their young playfellow snatched from 
death, and no less glad to note the public official 
recognition of his courageous act. The details of 
the story have been given through the columns of 
the local newspapers. May we add a leaf to his 
well-deserved laurels ? 

Miss R. — Have you seen Coquelin yet ? 

Miss {who has not been long in Boston). — 

No ; I have not visited all the churches. 

In Bible class : — 

Prof. — For what was Sardis particularly fa- 
mous ? 

Student. — Chestnuts were first found there. 

pourquoi ? 

Once a maid of preoccupied heart 
Took a caller to show him fine eart, 

But they sad down serene, 

Quite hid by a serene, 
And when caught gave a terrible start. 



SCIENTIFIC NOTES. 



What would happen if an irresistible force 
should strike an immovable body ? We have 
given it up. 

The far-famed city of Damascus, so bound up 
with memories of antiquity, and so Oriental in all 
its characteristics, is to have street cars, and be 
lighted with gas. 



At Parkersburg, Penn., two houses are being 
built which will have paper walls, paper partitions, 
and paper roofs. This adds one more to the 
manifold uses to which paper has recently been 
put in cases where great strength and durability 
of material are desirable. 

The superintendent of the Madras Museum 
has been requested to visit various electrical es- 
tablishments in Europe, in order to select an elec- 
tric globe light to shine in twenty fathoms of 
water. Such a light is wanted at the pearl fish- 
eries, for up to the present time, the work of the 
fisheries has been confined to shallow banks. 

Three hundred miles an hour is the proposed 
speed for the^electric postal railroad of the future. 
It is a compromise between the pneumatic tube 
and the ordinary railroad. It carries a miniature 
train of two cars solely for mails and light parcels, 
without any attendance. An experimental line 
has been erected at Laurel, twenty miles from 
Baltimore, Md., and, if it succeeds, it is stated 
that similar roads will be laid between Baltimore 
and Washington, and elsewhere. 

A cablegram from Munich announces that Dr. 
Kruss, a chemist of that city, has succeeded in 
decomposing cobalt and nickel, both of which 
have hitherto been supposed to be elementary 
substances. If the facts are as alleged, the dis- 
covery is one of great importance to the scien- 
tific world. 



POLITICAL NOTES. 
To make the centennial of the inauguration of 
Gen. Washington as President of the United 
States a success, a general committee has been 
formed, with Hamilton Fisk at its head, and the 
call is made to patriotic citizens for contributions 
of money to help pay the expenses of its celebra- 
tion on April 30, 1889. 

A bill has been introduced in the House for the 
admission of Arizona, South Dakota, and Idaho 
as States. 

The agent of the British East African Com- 
pany gives hundreds of slaves their freedom at 
Zanzibar. 

A resolution has been introduced in the House 
prohibiting the sale of alcoholic liquors at the 
inaugural ball. 



Lasell Leaves. 



95 



The subject of changing the State capital from 
Augusta to Portland is agitating the Maine people. 

The President-elect, Benj. Harriso'i, has now 
$40,000 insurance on his life. 

Judge Stratton, one of the Alabama Repub- 
licans who lately called on Ger . Harrison, has 
great hopes of the growth of the Republican 
party in the South. 

Prince Bismarck was present at the meeting 
of the Reichstag, and while there he denounced 
the Liberals. 

The Senate agrees to strike fresh fish off the 
free list, and make it dutiable at one half per 
cent a pound. 

New York citizens petition the Board of Excise 
Commissioners to diminish the liquor licenses. 

There are prospects of a new Panama Canal 
Company, which will buy out the old company? 
and still retain De Lesseps at its head. 

The United States Senate debated and amended 
the wool schedule of the Tariff Bill, increasing the 
duty. 

The Italian Parliament was opened by King 
Humbert, and he said : " Italy will continue to 
work for peace, which all desire, and which I can 
declare will be kept by us." 



MUSICAL NOTES. 



Herr Arthur Nikisch, the famous Leipsic 
conductor, succeeds Herr Wilhelm Gericke as di- 
rector of the Boston Symphony Orchestra. He 
has a contract for three years. 

A fine granite monument is to be erected in 
London as a memorial of Jenny Lind, the famous 
songstress. 

Mr. Willis Nowell returns to Boston in 
March. 

Mr. Willis Nowell, the violin soloist who will 
appear at the initial concert of the Wagnerian 
Club, is the owner of two of the finest violins in 
this country, genuine Stradivarii, known as "Nero" 
and "Elijah" The former was made in 1715, 
and was owned at one time by the Czar of Rus- 
sia. — Memphis Sunday Times. 

Mr. P. S. Gilmork, the renowned originator of 
the great Boston Jubilee of twenty years ago, will 



conduct a series of anniversaries commemorating 
that great event during April, May, and June. 
His famous band will have the assistance of 
Signor Campaniri, Signora De Vere, Madame 
Stone-Barton, Miss Helen Campbell, Signor Del 
Puente, and Mr. Myron W. Whitney. 

Josef Hofman is expected in London soon. 

Rubenstein is at work on a new oratorio cele- 
brating the miraculous preservation of the Czar 
and his family. 

The author of " Listen to the Mocking-Bird " 
has made $100,000 by that one effort. 



ART NOTES. 

Art should exhilarate and throw down the 
walls of circumstance on every side, awakening 
in the beholder the same sense of universal rela- 
tion and power which the work evinced in the 
artist, and its highest effect is to make new 
artists. — Emerson. 

In memory of Jean Francois Millet, the peasant 
painter, a monument is to be raised in Cherbourg, 
the town in which he received his first artistic 
education. The work is to be by M. Chapu, and 
will be placed in the Tardin Public. 

The immense mural painting of the " Ascen- 
sion of Christ," by John Lafarge, M. A., was re- 
cently unveiled in the Church of the Ascension, 
New York. The Magazine of Art pronounces it 
to be one of the finest productions of the new 
American school of mural painting. 

"The Pearl Diver," a statue which represents 
a youth lying drowned among sea grasses, was 
executed by Paul Akers, thirty years ago. It has 
been purchased by public subscription for the 
city of Portland, Me. 

Mr. Louis G. Mason, the Boston artist, con- 
templates going to Paris in May, where he will 
open a studio. 

The well-known banker, Mr. Henry G. Mar- 
quand, has given his rare collection of invaluable 
paintings to the Metropolitan Art Museum. Now, 
as this princely gift is generously laid open to the 
public, the rich and the poor, the educated and 
the illiterate, can alike enjoy its uplifting in- 
fluence, 



9 6 



Lasell Leaves. 



EXCHANGES. 

The Wellesley Courant is a welcome addition to 
our exchange list, and we are delighted that the 
college has at length taken an interest in college 
journalism. We have been waiting patiently, for 
some time past, to see our Wellesley friends take 
this step, and the enthusiasm with which they 
have entered upon this new undertaking fully 
meets our expectations. We have a sisterly inter- 
est in all papers edited by young women, and our 
best wishes go with the Courant in the prosperous 
career upon which it seems to be entering. 

The article, " Fast Life at Harvard," in one of 
the January numbers of the Oberlin Review, was 
the first thing to attract our attention, and was 
read with much interest. It was ably written, and 
proved the writer to be possessed of more than or- 
dinary ability ; but while we commend his work, 
we question the advisability of a college paper's 
taking issue against a sister college. It seems to 
us that it would have been in better taste had the 
article been published in some magazine or jour- 
nal outside of the college world. As members of 
the same family are always eager to protect and 
stand by one another, so each college should be 
anxious to preserve unspotted the reputation of its 
colleagues. 

An interesting article, " Kalevala and Hia- 
watha," is found in the Northwestern for Jan. 25. 
Its aim is to show the great similarity between 
Longfellow's poem and the great Finnish epic. 
The writer seems to be of the opinion that Long- 
fellow borrowed his idea of Hiawatha from this 
poem of the Finns ; but, be that as it may, we 
could ill afford to lose those beautifully written 
legends from our literature, and after all we must 
remember that " there is no new thing under the 
sun." However, the article is worthy of much 
commendation. Our interest did not flag until the 
last word had been reached. 

The withering sarcasm which the Tuftonian has 
seen fit to pour upon our unprotected heads, in 
answer to the comment made upon its exchange 
column in one of our recent issues, combined with 
the chilling blasts of the cold winter, has nearly 
shattered our constitution. Our natural curiosity, 
however, helps us to survive, for we feel that we 
Tinnot rest easy until we learn for what purpose 



the exchange column of the above-mentioned paper 
is conducted. We are politely informed that it is 
not for such as we, and presumably not for any 
particular reason. Then is it conducted exclu- 
sively for the benefit of the exchange editor, or 
does the exchange column exist merely for the 
purpose of " filling up" ? If a little light could be 
thrown on the matter we should be gratified. 

Certain of our exchanges seem to be a little 
troubled as to the authorship of several exchange 
notes which appeared in the November number 
of our paper, and again appeared as original 
work in the December number of the High School 
Bulletin, Lawrence, Mass. It seems to us that 
the fact of their appearing in our paper a month 
ahead of the Bulletin should be sufficient proof 
tha', such as they were, they originated with us. 
However, if any doubt is still felt, we will offer to 
produce not only the young woman who wrote 
them, and the stub pen with which they were writ- 
ten, but also many witnesses who can vouch for 
our veracity. 

We find a bright little sketch in the Bowdoin 
Orient upon the subject " Grinding." It is well 
worth the consideration of the average college 
student, and the writer's ideas are put forth in a 
very pleasing manner. The truth of his remarks 
can be attested by any one who has been in col- 
lege or boarding-school for any length of time. 

The last number of the College Transcript was 
unusually good ; it contained many articles of in- 
terest, and was read with much attention ' : A 
Glimpse of Mexico City " was especially delight- 
ful, both on account of its beautiful description, 
and because of the author's well-chosen words. 

Isn't it about time for us to hear the last of the 
" Glee Club's Western Trip " ? 

The criticism which the Bates Student makes 
upon us in its January number seems to us a little 
harsh. It will be remembered that in our Decem- 
ber number we inserted a poem from the Harvard 
Advocate, entitled " Leap Year." Now, the Student 
considers this poem one of " questionable refine- 
ment," and proceeds to inquire what we can ex- 
pect of college men when we countenance and 
encourage such coarseness. We feel that an ex- 
planation is necessary. We have the most intense 



Lasell Leaves. 



97 



longing for culture, but alas ! our location is not 
favorable, for one thing, and, situated as we are, 
so near the insignificant little town of Boston, it 
seems hardly possible that we can ever hope to 
attain to that delicacy and refinement which are so 
easily acquired by the students at Bates in the 
classic atmosphere of Lewiston, Me. Again, it 
has long been a custom with us to encourage 
struggling journals : now, Harvard is but a small 
and obscure (?) university, and we thought to en- 
courage the editors of the Advocate by publishing a 
selection from their paper in our own. Possibly, 
we may have done wrong ; but we trust by the 

ESTABLISHED 1851. 



N. W. TURNER COMPANY, 

ARTISTIC 

GAS FIXTURES, 

Duplex Lamps, 

C H~ U R CH MB TAL WORK, 

27 and 29 Bromfield Street, 



BOSTON - . 



S-.£ZbSB? TT 'l"»°PR.«ons. 



C. H. HOPKINS S CO. 



SCHOOL, 



CHURCH AND 



OPERA 



SEATINGS. 

31 Milk St., Boston, Mass. 



time Harvard and Lasell have attained to the 
high moral standard raised by the Student, we 
shall not sin so grievously against the innate re- 
finement of our college friends. 

After reading the " Trials of the Exchange 
Editor " of the W. P. I. we feel that we can sym- 
pathize with him most heartily. Truth to tell, his 
sketch was so very life-like that it almost brought 
tears to our eyes, and we feel that we have recog- 
nized in him a kindred spirit. 

MRS. LINCOLN'S 

COOK BOOK. 



THE BOSTON COOK BOOK Price, $2.00 

THE BOSTON SCHOOL KITCHEN TEXT-BOOK, " 1.00 

CARVING AND SERVING " 0.60 

THE PEERLESS COOK BOOK " 0.10 

Discount on the first three books to all who have been 
members of Lasell Seminary since September, 
1884. 
Address, 

MRS, D. A, LINCOLN - - WOLLASTON, MASS, 
McFAELIN'S 

CHINA PARLOR, 

39 FRANKLIN STREET, BOSTON. 

SPECIALTIES IN 

pine China and Gut QIass. 

OPEN ON NOV. 1, 1888, 

A Full Line of Novelties for 
GHRISTMHS. 

TO N©W YORK H-ffifiSr 
FLARES REDUCED. 
I ALL RIVER LINE. 

Express trains, connecting with steamer at Fall River in 80 minutes, 
leave Boston from Old Colony station week days at 6 P. M., Sundays at 7 
P. M. Due in New York at about 7.30. A. M. Connection to Brooklyn 
and Jersey City by Annex Boat. 

Steamers PILGRIM and BRISTOL in commission. Steam heat in 
staterooms. AN ORCHESTRA on each steamer throughout the year. 

Baggage checked from hotel or residence to destination. Returning, 
steamers leave New York daily, Sundays included. 

Tickets, staterooms, etc., secured at the line office, No. 3, Old State 
House, and at the Old Colony station. 

J. R. KENDRICK, GEO. L. CONNOR, 

General Manager. Gen'l Pass'r Agt. 

L. H. PALMER, Agt. 

3 Old State House. 




9 8 



Lasell Leaves. 



Allen Solly & Co.'s High-class 
Hosiery and Underwear, in the natural 
gray lamb's wool, white merino, and the famous 
brown, all weights and sizes, 28 to 50 inches, at 
Noye-5 Bros.' 

Blanket Wraps for the Nursery, the 
Bath, the Sick-room, or Steamer Travelling, 
for Men, Women, Children and the Baby, at 
Noyes Bros.' 

Morning and Evening Wedding 

Outfits, in Shirts, Collars, Cravats and 
Gloves, a specialty at Noyes Bros.' 

English Mackintosh Coats, for Ladies 
and Gentlemen, at Noyes Bros.' 

English Silk Umbrellas, in Gold, Silver 
and Natural Wood Handles, Ladies' and 
Men's, $2.75 to #35.00, very rare and choice 
designs, at Noyes Bros.' 

English Travelling Rugs, for Railway 
and Steamer Use, $3.75 to #50.00, at Noyes 
Bros.' 

English Dressing Gowns, Study 
Coats, House Coats and Office Coats, 
and Long Wraps, $5.00 to #45.00, in stock 
or to measure, at Noyes Bros.' 

NOYES BROS., 

Hosiers, Glovers and Shirt Makers, 

Washington and Summer Streets, 

BOSTON, U. S. A. 




Blanket Wraps for the Nursery, for the 
Sick-room, for the Bath, for Steamer Travelling, 
for the Railway Carriages, for Yachting, for Men, 
Women, Children and the Baby, at Noyes Bros.' 

Blanket Slippers for the Sick-room, the Bath 
or Dressing-room, for Men, Women and Children, 
at 75 cents per pair, at Noyes Bros.' 

English Holdalls, indispensable to Travellers, 
at Noyes Bros.' 

New English Neck Wear, Collars, Cuffs 
and Dress Shirts, in every possible style and quality, 
at Noyes Bros.' 

Ladies' Silk Umbrellas in Fancy Colored 
Stripes. Plaids and Large Figures; new, stylish and 
desirable, at Noyes Bros.' 

The last London production in Ladies' English 
Waterproofs are to be had at Noyes Bros.', 
#7.50 to $45.00 — just opened. 



DRESS SHIRTS 

For Weddings and Receptions. 

. The present fashion of Shirts with Linen 
Cords, Embroidered Figures and Spot Bosoms, 
may be had of Noyes Bros., most thoroughly 
and elegantly made. 

We have a Special Department for Re- 
pairing Shirts, Hosiery, Underwear, Gloves, or 
any article belonging to Gentlemen; can be 
laundered and rer aired at short notice at 
Noyes Bros.' 

There are 81 offices in Boston who advertise 
Troy Laundry. Messrs. Noyes Bros. 
are the only house in Boston that actually 
send goods there. 

We send the work every day, and return in 
five days, and give new goods for any damaged. 

Special Laundry Department for 

Dress Shirts, Vests and Wash-Scarfs. Re 
laundered equal to new goods at Noves Bros.' 

Family Laundry Work called for and 
returned with no extra charge. 

NOYES BROS., 

Hosiers, Glovers and Shirt Makers, 

Washington and Summer Stieets, 

BOSTON, MASS., U. S. A. 



ESTABLISHED 1817- 



JOHN H. PRAY, SONS & CO. 

Importers, Jobbers, Retailers and Manufacturers' Agents. 

Carpetings, Mattings, Oil Cloth, 

ORIENTAL rugs, 

CARPETS AND UPHOLSTERY. 



558 and 560 Washington St., 

30 to 34 Harrison Ave. Extension, 



BOSTON. 



113 Worth Street 



NEW YORK. 



Lasell Leaves. 



99 



A. STOWELL & CO. 

24 Winter Street, Boston. 



^onie of our Specialties : 

Bohemian Garnet Jewelry. 
Amber Beads and Ornaments. 
Tortoise-Shell Hair Pins. 
Choice Leather Goods. 
Oxidized Silver Jewelry. 
Fans for all occasions. 
Pearl Opera Glasses. 
Fine Gold Jewelry. 

Wedding Presents in Clocks, Vases and 
Bronzes. 

LATEST NOVELTIES IN ALL DEPARTMENTS. 
Lowest Prices. 



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YOTTJSTQ LADIES' 

p/!S}*IO|^Bl£ S^OES 

OF ALL KINDS. 

THAYER, MCNEIL & HODGKINS, 

47 Temple Place, Boston. 

ARTHUR P. SCHMIDT & CO. 

IMPORTERS OF AND DEALERS IN 

FOREIGN AND AMERICAN 

Sheet Music. 

Sole Agents lor Lilolffs Celebrated Edition ol 
Classical and Modern Music. 

13 AND 15 WEST ST., BOSTON. 

Catalogues sent free on application. 



BOSTON 


FOREIGN 


BOOK 


STORE, 


BOOKS 


IN ALL FOREIGN LANGUAGES. 


CARL. SCHOENHOF 


t 


14,4 Tremont 


Street 


One 


FJighit Up. 



HENRY W. GOODWIN. 
UNION CABINETS 

AND 

Perfection Roll Toilet Paper, 

BRYANT & MAY'S PARLOR, WAX AND SAFETY MATCHES. 

114 MILK STREET, 

BOSTON - ~ MMSS 

Prices furnished upon application. 

H. H. NEWELL, 

DEALER IN 

Boots, Shoes and Rubbers. 

Repairing of all kinds Neatly and Promptly Done. 

POST OFFICE BUILDING - - AUBURN ST., 

AUBURNDALB. 



ESTABLISHED IS4-0. 



Isaac Locke & Company, 

Produce Commission Merchants, 



And Dealers in 



FOREIGN and DOMESTIC FRUITS 

97, 99 and 101 Faneuil Hall Market, and Basement 18 Sontli Side, 

BOSTON - - - MASS. 

Telephone Connection. 



IOO 



La sell Leaves. 



^WEBER'S* 

25, 27 TEMPLE PLACE - - - BOSTON, 

AJNTD 33 "WEST STREET, 

Ladies' and Gents' Restaurant, 

Oysters and Salads a Specialty. 

OPEN AFTER THEATRES. 

Caterer for Wedding Breakfasts, Lunches, Dinner and Evening Parties 

and Receptions. Also, Club Suppers at Short Notice 

and Reasonable Prices. 



S. "W. BAILEY, 

DEALER IN 

WATCHES, JEWELRY, SILVERWARE, ETC. 

353 Washington St., Boston. (Up One Flight,) 

J ewelry Neatly Repaired. Also, Monograms on Coin Pieces. Personal 
Attention given to Repairing Fine Watches. 

ESTABLISHED 1847- 



AARON K. GAY & CO. 

]STo. 122 State Street, Boston, 

STATIONERS 

— AND 

BLANK BOOK MANUFACTURERS, 



First-Class Account Books of any desired 
pattern made to order. 

S. S. GAY. EDWIN W. GAY 

JUST WHAT HAS BEEN WANTED. 

A LADIES' LUNCH ROOM 

HAS BEEN OI'ENED AT 

23 AVON STREET, BOSTON. 

A quiet, neat place, where a nice Lunch can be had at a very reason- 
able price. All the ladies say, " Isn't it nice ? " 

T. D. COOK, Caterer. 

ALSO, 

Wedcling and other Parties 

Served with the Choicest Viands, and by Competent Waiters. 

SUPERIOR ICE- CREAM 

DELIVERED AT REASONABLE PRICES. 



youNG 



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EUROPEAN PLAN. 



OPPOSITE THE HEAD OF STATE STREET, BOSTON. 

Ladies' entrance, Court Street, near Washington Street. 

J. R. WHIPPLE, PROPRIETOR. 

J. N. LINDSAY & CO., 

STERLING SILVER^ REED & BARTON'S PLATED WARE, 

Also, Plating, Gilding and Repairing. 

421 WASHINGTON ST., BOSTON. 



GEO. H. WH1TFORD. 



HENRY T. HARTWELL. 



FURS. 



IMPORTANT SUGGESTION. 



Furs to be altered and repaired 
will receive prompt and careful 
attention, with less expense, before 
cold weather crowds our furriers 
"with work. Seals to be re-dyed 
should be sent to us at once. 

We are now receiving orders for 
our well-known superior seal gar- 
ments made to measure. 

Our Sealskins this season de- 
serve special mention for quality 
and richness, never before sur- 
passed. Patrons who place their 
orders with us early will appre- 
ciate this suggestion. 

Jos. .A. Jaxxksojnt, 

412 WASHINGTON ST., BOSTON. 
Established 1S25. 

NATHAN NEAT & GO. 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

—•■■^n^^- ZETTlsriE « > ' :x >e-i~- 







BASKET TRUNKS AND STEAMER CHAIRS. 
Stateroom and Light-Weight Trunks for European Travel. 



SEND FOR ILLUSTRATED CATALOGUE. 



566 WASHINGTON ST., BOSTON, MASS. 

De Wolfe, Fiske & Co., 

BOOKSELLERS, 
361 and 365 WASHINGTON STREET. 



NpIV ^ImPP Wrt C \(\\ I All the New IPopular and Standard Books at 



Archway, No. 365. 



i j> 



lowest prices, Gift Books, Bibles, Albums, etc. 



Bargains in cheap editions, Second-hand and 
paper-covered books, Juveniles, etc., etc. 



THE MOST COMPLETE BOOK-STORE IN BOSTON. 



Lasell Leaves. 



101 



Shreve Crump & Low Co. 

432 WASHINGTON ST. 

BOSTON. 

\!(/ atches, ^T) i amends, 
(l ewelr ij, 

f inest C^ottei 



U 



Designs furnished for Class Rings, Pins, Etc. 

A Fine Assortment of Choicest Stationery. 
Invitations, Cards and Programmes. 



W. H. FRENCH & CO. 

PLUMBERS, GAS FITTERS, 

AND 

SANITARY ENGINEERS. 

JUDSON'S BUILDING, 0PP. RAILROAD STATION, 

WEST NEWTON. 



All Work Promptly Attended to and Warranted Satisfactory. 

I. W. C0NR0Y & SON, 

flOUSE^SIGN PAINTERS, 

WEST NEWTON, MASS, 

Chestnut St., near Depot. 

Residence, cor. Cherry and Derby Sts. 
glazier work a. specialty. 



THE "PEERLESS" FOUNTAIN PEN 




IS THE PERFECTION OF FOUNTAIN PENS. 

Is a hard rubber holder fitted with a 16 k. gold pen of the best manufacture, and will never wear out. It will write ten thousand words with one 
filling of ink, and for taking lectures, etc., it is indispensable. There is no loss of time in dipping ink as with the ordinary pen, as the " Peerless '.' 
has a perfect, even and uninterrupted flow of ink, and is the best fountain pen manufactured. Price, $2.00. 

The Cross Stylographic Pen, Stylographic Ink. All styles of Stylographic, Fountain, and Gold Pens repaired. 



THE CROSS PEN CO., 306 Washington St. 



BOSTON, MASS. 



1TE22T X>CO:K. TO OLD SOTTTH CHTJEOH:. 



G- ZED O. IE. 

12 Winter Street 



ALLEN" 
■ - - - Boston. 



BUTTONS, LACES, YARNS, CORSETS, 

AND FANCY GOODS. 



IT. H. HUNT, 

CARPENTER AND BUILDER, 

WEST NEWTON, MASS. 
Shop near R, R, Crossing. P. 0. Box 235. 



NI. K. FORD'S 

ladies' Boot andiohoe Jjarlor, 

Room 59, Phillips Building, 
120 Tremont St, (Cor. Hamilton Place), Boston, Mass. 

Particular attention given to fitting tender and lame feet. 

Hand and Machine Sewed work at Reasonable Prices. 
Formerly with Ford &* McQuade, } 

40 Temple Place. \ TAKE ELEVATOR. 

Boots to measure from $5.50 upwards. 



CONRAD'S 

Cloaks, Furs and Trimmings, 

Laces, Gloves, Small Wares, Buttons and Braids, 



35 Winter Street - 

Mail orders promptly attended to. 



Boston, Mass. 

Established 1852. 



102 



Lasell Leaves. 



C. H. CODMAN & CO. 

Photographic Material, 

PICTURE and FRAME DEALERS' 

<A SUPPLIES > 
Wholesale and Retail Framing 

AMATEUR PHOTOGRAPHIC APPARATUS, 

34 BROMFIELD STREET, 
BOSTON ... MASS. 

LIVERY, HACK, 



•AJNTD- 



BOARDING STABLE. 



ESTABLISHED 1861. 



S. F. CATE, WEST NEWTON, 



Barge " City of Newton." 

Boat Sleigh "Snow Bird." 

HILL cSc GO-WE1T, 
(Successors to A. A. Kendall,) 

COMMISSION MERCHANTS and Dealers in 

FOREIGN AND DOMESTIC FRUITS AND PRODUCE, 

a. b. hill. Nos. 13 and 15 Merchants Row, BOSTON, c. s. gowen. 
HENRY MAIS, 

LADIES' HAIR DRESSER. 

Ladies' Hair Cut, Curled, and Shampooed in the most 

Artistic Manner. 

58 TEMPLE PLACE - - - BOSTON. 

FANCY GROCERIES A SPECIALTY- 



H. E. WOODBERRY, 

DEALER IN FINE GROCERIES, 

Cor. of Washington and Chestnut Sts., West Newton, Mass. 

BRANCH AT AUBURNDALE. 



HRLL & COLE, 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 

FRUITSIIOEGETABLES, 

190 and 102 Faneui! Hall Market, Boston. 



C. J. LITTLEFIELD, 

DEALER IN 

Fruits knd Produce, 

terms cash. No. 24 NORTH MARKET ST., BOSTON. 
D. M. OLIVER & CO., 

DEALERS IN 

PORK, LARD, HAMS, BACON, 

Sausages, Tripe, Dried Beef, Beef Tongues, Bolognas, etc. 
26 Faneuil Hall, or Quincy Market - - BOSTON. 

HARRISON SWAN. STEPHEN J. MOULTON. 

HARRISON SWAN & CO., 

DEALERS IN 

poultry apd U/ild ()a/r\e. 

1 Faneuil Hall Market, 

BOSTON. 

TELEPHONE CONNECTION. 

MILLS &. PEERING, 



RECEIVERS AND DEALERS IN 



BUTTER, CHEESE # EGGS, 

STALL 22, QUINCY MARKET, BOSTON. 
W. C. MILLS. E. F. DEERING. 

JOHN <P. SQUIRE & CO., 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

ABSOLUTELY PURE LARD. 

21, 23, and 25 Faneuil Hall Market, Boston, Mass. 

J". KNOWLBS <to SONS, 
Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 

Fresh, Smoked and Pickled Fish, Oysters and Clams, 

Stalls 121 and 123 FANEUIL HALL MARKET. 



J. KNOWLES. 



R. H. KNOWLES. 



J. A. KNOWLES. 



GEORGE E. RICHARDSON & CO., 

DEALERS IN 

Foreign and Domestic Fruits, Produce, Nuts, 

Cigars, Tobacco, Etc. California Fruit a Specialty, 
No. 1 FANEUIL HALL SQUARE 
(Opposite South side of Faneuil Hall). 
Geo. E. Richardson. Frank E. Richardson. 

SLAYTON &, BOYNTON, 
COMMISSION MERCHANTS 

FOR THESALEOFGENERAL PRODUCE 

19 BLACKSTONE STREET, BOSTON. 



J. C. F. SLAYTON. 



TELEPHONE NO. 1761. 



W. W. BOYNTON. 



SPECTACLES 

MADE TO 
ORDER AND 
REPAIRED. 

L. J. Mc INTIRE, OPTICIAN, 
NO. 357 WASHINGTON ST., BOSTON* 




Lasell Leaves. 




MRQ I DMflTRV fl «>>»« p l»»<>(Sr»phe<irromlIf9Witb»io "ECLIPSE." »£- Out 
1T1IVU. I_rUXU 1 I\ I of bw MotntM will bo %ina aa a aoumnir with iMh Outfit. 

Amateur Photograpliy. Just the Thing for Country or Seaside. 

HORSMAN'S No, 3 ECLIPSE OUTFIT. 

■ PRICE $10.00 

Camera makes a 
Full Sire CABI- 
NET PHOTO- 
GRAPH orview, 
Biz* i% by 6Jf in., 
and is provided 
with an attachmen t 
for making verti- 
cal or horizontal 
pictures. It con- 
sists of Polished 
Hardwood Camera 
with Folding Bed, 
Double Plate 
Holder, Fine Brass 
Mounted Lens 
with set of 8top8, 
Folding Tripod, 
Car rying Case, 
Printing Frame, 
and Complete 
Chemical Outfit. 

1 Specimen Pho- 
tograph made with 
No. S Outfit by 
mail on receipt